2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157887
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Research Use & Access: Interviews with Practicing Rural Nurses in Montana
Abstract:
Research Use & Access: Interviews with Practicing Rural Nurses in Montana
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2006
Author:Winters, Charlene, PhD, APRN, BC
P.I. Institution Name:Montana State University-Bozeman
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:College of Nursing, 32 Campus Drive #7416, Missoula, MT, 59812-7416, United States
Contact Telephone:406-243-4608
Co-Authors:Jamie Besel, BSN, RN; John E. Dea III, BSN, RN, CEN, CFRN; Kathy Palm Jorgensen, BS, APRN; and Helen J. Lee, PhD, RN
Purpose: The purpose of this presentation is to provide qualitative findings from interviews with rural Montana nurses that explored their perceptions of the availability, use, and usefulness of research in their practice. Significance: Nursing research is critical for evidence-based practice. Reported barriers to using research include nurses' poor knowledge and attitude toward research and the manner that research is presented. Organizational barriers cited in the literature from urban settings include: lack of time or staff; access to research information; support from managers; and independence within the organization. This study adds to the body of nursing knowledge by exploring rural nurses' access and use of research. Design/Methods: Graduate nursing students supervised by faculty used ethnographic methods to explore the availability, use and usefulness of research for rural nurses. Students collected community data from existing databases. Twenty-nine rural nurses agreed to participate in semi-structured interviews. Verbatim transcripts and extensive field notes recorded by the student researchers were analyzed for common themes. Findings: Rural nurses equated research with gathering information. The Internet, colleagues, work-place journals, books, in-services, and conferences were identified as primary sources of information. The nurses' preferred means of obtaining information was asking a colleague. Supportive supervisors and research reported in general nursing journals that were easy to read, practical, and directly related to rural patient care were identified as helpful. Managers and supervisors had more access to research than staff nurses. Lack of time and knowledge of research methods, limited Internet access, diminishing financial support, and distance to conferences were seen as barriers to accessing research. Implications: The results provided content validation during the construction of the cross-border survey described in the next paper of the symposium. Overall nursing implications from the qualitative interviews include the need for education amongst rural nurses regarding ways of knowing and the types and strength of evidence; linkages with larger health care centers/colleges of nursing for on-site and teleconference in-services; increased access and proximity of the Internet to nursing units; and increased support and role modeling by supervisors of evidence-based practice. Funding: Montana State University-Bozeman College of Nursing Block Grant.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleResearch Use & Access: Interviews with Practicing Rural Nurses in Montanaen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157887-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Research Use &amp; Access: Interviews with Practicing Rural Nurses in Montana</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Winters, Charlene, PhD, APRN, BC</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Montana State University-Bozeman</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, 32 Campus Drive #7416, Missoula, MT, 59812-7416, United States</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">406-243-4608</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">winters@montana.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Jamie Besel, BSN, RN; John E. Dea III, BSN, RN, CEN, CFRN; Kathy Palm Jorgensen, BS, APRN; and Helen J. Lee, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: The purpose of this presentation is to provide qualitative findings from interviews with rural Montana nurses that explored their perceptions of the availability, use, and usefulness of research in their practice. Significance: Nursing research is critical for evidence-based practice. Reported barriers to using research include nurses' poor knowledge and attitude toward research and the manner that research is presented. Organizational barriers cited in the literature from urban settings include: lack of time or staff; access to research information; support from managers; and independence within the organization. This study adds to the body of nursing knowledge by exploring rural nurses' access and use of research. Design/Methods: Graduate nursing students supervised by faculty used ethnographic methods to explore the availability, use and usefulness of research for rural nurses. Students collected community data from existing databases. Twenty-nine rural nurses agreed to participate in semi-structured interviews. Verbatim transcripts and extensive field notes recorded by the student researchers were analyzed for common themes. Findings: Rural nurses equated research with gathering information. The Internet, colleagues, work-place journals, books, in-services, and conferences were identified as primary sources of information. The nurses' preferred means of obtaining information was asking a colleague. Supportive supervisors and research reported in general nursing journals that were easy to read, practical, and directly related to rural patient care were identified as helpful. Managers and supervisors had more access to research than staff nurses. Lack of time and knowledge of research methods, limited Internet access, diminishing financial support, and distance to conferences were seen as barriers to accessing research. Implications: The results provided content validation during the construction of the cross-border survey described in the next paper of the symposium. Overall nursing implications from the qualitative interviews include the need for education amongst rural nurses regarding ways of knowing and the types and strength of evidence; linkages with larger health care centers/colleges of nursing for on-site and teleconference in-services; increased access and proximity of the Internet to nursing units; and increased support and role modeling by supervisors of evidence-based practice. Funding: Montana State University-Bozeman College of Nursing Block Grant.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:18:02Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:18:02Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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