2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157889
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Physiological Effects of Gambling in Women
Abstract:
Physiological Effects of Gambling in Women
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2006
Author:Yucha, Carolyn, RN, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Nevada, Las Vegas
Title:Professor and Dean
Contact Address:School of Nursing, Box 453018, 4505 Maryland Parkway, Las Vegas, NV, 89154-3018, USA
Contact Telephone:702-895-5307
Co-Authors:Bo Bernhard, PhD, Assistant Professor and Catherine Prato, RN, BS
Purpose: The purpose of this pilot/feasibility study was to describe the physiological responses occurring during slot gambling in females without gambling addiction and to develop procedures for a larger study. Background: Despite the fact that gambling now enjoys widespread popularity, little is known about the effects that gambling has on the human body. At the same time, evidence is accumulating that gambling behavior can directly affect physiological, emotional and mental states. A small number of studies in men have shown that heart rate is increased by gambling at blackjack, poker machines, and slot machines. Fewer studies have been done on female gamblers, but the physiological effects are similar. Heart rate was higher during and after play for those who won, compared to those who only lost; and such increases in heart rate correlate positively with the magnitude of the stakes. Methods: Twelve healthy females, aged 26-66, volunteered to participate in this study while they were gambling with their own money in a Las Vegas casino. None of the volunteers were regular gamblers. The Biograph Infiniti data acquisition system was used to continuously measure and store skin temperature, skin conductance, heart rate, muscle activity, and respiration. Blood pressure (BP) was measured every 2 minutes using a Dynamap Pro 100. Physiological parameters were collected continuously for 5 minutes prior to start of gambling (baseline), 10 minutes while playing "Black Rhino" (stress), and 5 minutes post-gambling (recovery). Data were analyzed using repeated measures ANOVA. Results: Temperature rose 2oF along time (p<.01); respiration increased 3 breaths per minute during gambling (p<.05) and fell during recovery. Other non-significant trends were also found: systolic BP rose 3 mmHg during gambling and fell during recovery; diastolic BP rose 2 mmHg during gambling and fell during recovery; skin conductance rose 2 mhos during gambling and fell during recovery; and heart rate rose 4 bpm during gambling and fell during recovery. Implications: The observed effects suggest that non-gambling females find slot play to be stressful because changes were consistent with a stress response. The effects were small, but some participants did not understand "Black Rhino" and most gambled only small amounts. The maximum loss was $14.35 and the maximum win was $12.10 (one outlier won $135). If these small effects can be seen in this small study on non-gambling women, we hypothesize that larger effects would be observed in those with problematic or pathological gambling patterns. This information may help us to better understand the physiological basis of addictive behaviors.
This study was funded by a grant from the UNLV School of Nursing Center of Excellence in Women's Health, U.S. Department of Education. The contents of this abstract do not necessarily represent the policy of the Department of Education, and you should not assume endorsement by the Federal Government.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePhysiological Effects of Gambling in Womenen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157889-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Physiological Effects of Gambling in Women</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Yucha, Carolyn, RN, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Nevada, Las Vegas</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor and Dean</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, Box 453018, 4505 Maryland Parkway, Las Vegas, NV, 89154-3018, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">702-895-5307</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">carolyn.yucha@ccmail.nevada.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Bo Bernhard, PhD, Assistant Professor and Catherine Prato, RN, BS</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: The purpose of this pilot/feasibility study was to describe the physiological responses occurring during slot gambling in females without gambling addiction and to develop procedures for a larger study. Background: Despite the fact that gambling now enjoys widespread popularity, little is known about the effects that gambling has on the human body. At the same time, evidence is accumulating that gambling behavior can directly affect physiological, emotional and mental states. A small number of studies in men have shown that heart rate is increased by gambling at blackjack, poker machines, and slot machines. Fewer studies have been done on female gamblers, but the physiological effects are similar. Heart rate was higher during and after play for those who won, compared to those who only lost; and such increases in heart rate correlate positively with the magnitude of the stakes. Methods: Twelve healthy females, aged 26-66, volunteered to participate in this study while they were gambling with their own money in a Las Vegas casino. None of the volunteers were regular gamblers. The Biograph Infiniti data acquisition system was used to continuously measure and store skin temperature, skin conductance, heart rate, muscle activity, and respiration. Blood pressure (BP) was measured every 2 minutes using a Dynamap Pro 100. Physiological parameters were collected continuously for 5 minutes prior to start of gambling (baseline), 10 minutes while playing &quot;Black Rhino&quot; (stress), and 5 minutes post-gambling (recovery). Data were analyzed using repeated measures ANOVA. Results: Temperature rose 2oF along time (p&lt;.01); respiration increased 3 breaths per minute during gambling (p&lt;.05) and fell during recovery. Other non-significant trends were also found: systolic BP rose 3 mmHg during gambling and fell during recovery; diastolic BP rose 2 mmHg during gambling and fell during recovery; skin conductance rose 2 mhos during gambling and fell during recovery; and heart rate rose 4 bpm during gambling and fell during recovery. Implications: The observed effects suggest that non-gambling females find slot play to be stressful because changes were consistent with a stress response. The effects were small, but some participants did not understand &quot;Black Rhino&quot; and most gambled only small amounts. The maximum loss was $14.35 and the maximum win was $12.10 (one outlier won $135). If these small effects can be seen in this small study on non-gambling women, we hypothesize that larger effects would be observed in those with problematic or pathological gambling patterns. This information may help us to better understand the physiological basis of addictive behaviors. <br/>This study was funded by a grant from the UNLV School of Nursing Center of Excellence in Women's Health, U.S. Department of Education. The contents of this abstract do not necessarily represent the policy of the Department of Education, and you should not assume endorsement by the Federal Government.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:18:09Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:18:09Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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