2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157890
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Member's Reported Satisfaction of a Psycho-Social Club: Tool Development
Abstract:
Member's Reported Satisfaction of a Psycho-Social Club: Tool Development
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2006
Author:Yurkovich, Eleanor, EdD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of North Dakota
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:College of Nursing, PO Box 9025, Grand Forks, ND, 58202, USA
Contact Telephone:701-777-4554
Co-Authors:Evelyn Labun, DNSc, RN and Izetta Lattergrass, BA
Background: In the 1960's, mental health services (MHS) became dependent on regional centres and community services. One such service model is the psychosocial club which has the potential to reduce the utilization of costly in-patient services. However, validation of the benefits a person with chronic mental illness experiences in attending a psychosocial club is needed. With this knowledge, providers can support maintenance of wellness. Purpose/Conceptual Framework: This study reports on the development of quantitative tools that measure membership benefits through and satisfaction with attending a club. These tools evolved from findings of a mixed methods research study conducted with club members. Grounded theory design and methodology including constant comparative analysis was utilized with simple descriptive statistics. The findings included the emergence of six healthy benefits/outcomes (belonging, learning how to live, feeling safe, helping others, having hope, and using resources to benefit self). The focus of this abstract are the quantitative tools developed in response to a club director's request and a fruitless search of the literature. Methods: Because the intended audience is the membership of a psycho-social club who are usually persons experiencing chronic mental illness, key issues given consideration during tool development were level of language; length of tool; and the complexity of items, questions, and method of determining outcomes (simple descriptive statistics). The completed tools have the following sections: members' demographics, attendance and accessing patterns, 18 items on outcomes; a satisfaction scale; and a three-question section on their knowledge of club's services, and club areas in need of improvement. Findings: Once human subject review was completed, data was gathered. After piloting the tools (n=24), two versions of the tool were tested by a research team member using 98 members from a Psychosocial Club. The alpha reliability coefficient for Tool 1 was .89 (split-half reliability of .86). The alpha reliability coefficient for Tool 2 was .93 (split-half reliability of .94). Correlations between satisfaction ratings and scores on the six subscales were significant except for "helping others." This latter finding correlated with written comments that indicate some members do not feel safe. Therefore, their ability to help others is hindered because of lack of trust and feeling insecure. Implications: These tools now provide a mechanism for club members and staff to do their own quality assurance projects. Findings can be effectively used to develop their programs and for grant applications. These tools provide data that contribute to evidence-based practice, because of questions indicating the outcome of their attendance (e.g. reduced hospital admissions). These measured outcomes further support the effectiveness of psychosocial clubs. Now nurses have research support for their recommendations to clients to actively engage in a community psycho-social club. Further testing of the tools in different settings and populations is in process. Funding: (no fund number) College of Nursing Research Office at University of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMember's Reported Satisfaction of a Psycho-Social Club: Tool Developmenten_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157890-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Member's Reported Satisfaction of a Psycho-Social Club: Tool Development</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Yurkovich, Eleanor, EdD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of North Dakota</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, PO Box 9025, Grand Forks, ND, 58202, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">701-777-4554</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">eleanoryurkovich@mail.und.nodak.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Evelyn Labun, DNSc, RN and Izetta Lattergrass, BA</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Background: In the 1960's, mental health services (MHS) became dependent on regional centres and community services. One such service model is the psychosocial club which has the potential to reduce the utilization of costly in-patient services. However, validation of the benefits a person with chronic mental illness experiences in attending a psychosocial club is needed. With this knowledge, providers can support maintenance of wellness. Purpose/Conceptual Framework: This study reports on the development of quantitative tools that measure membership benefits through and satisfaction with attending a club. These tools evolved from findings of a mixed methods research study conducted with club members. Grounded theory design and methodology including constant comparative analysis was utilized with simple descriptive statistics. The findings included the emergence of six healthy benefits/outcomes (belonging, learning how to live, feeling safe, helping others, having hope, and using resources to benefit self). The focus of this abstract are the quantitative tools developed in response to a club director's request and a fruitless search of the literature. Methods: Because the intended audience is the membership of a psycho-social club who are usually persons experiencing chronic mental illness, key issues given consideration during tool development were level of language; length of tool; and the complexity of items, questions, and method of determining outcomes (simple descriptive statistics). The completed tools have the following sections: members' demographics, attendance and accessing patterns, 18 items on outcomes; a satisfaction scale; and a three-question section on their knowledge of club's services, and club areas in need of improvement. Findings: Once human subject review was completed, data was gathered. After piloting the tools (n=24), two versions of the tool were tested by a research team member using 98 members from a Psychosocial Club. The alpha reliability coefficient for Tool 1 was .89 (split-half reliability of .86). The alpha reliability coefficient for Tool 2 was .93 (split-half reliability of .94). Correlations between satisfaction ratings and scores on the six subscales were significant except for &quot;helping others.&quot; This latter finding correlated with written comments that indicate some members do not feel safe. Therefore, their ability to help others is hindered because of lack of trust and feeling insecure. Implications: These tools now provide a mechanism for club members and staff to do their own quality assurance projects. Findings can be effectively used to develop their programs and for grant applications. These tools provide data that contribute to evidence-based practice, because of questions indicating the outcome of their attendance (e.g. reduced hospital admissions). These measured outcomes further support the effectiveness of psychosocial clubs. Now nurses have research support for their recommendations to clients to actively engage in a community psycho-social club. Further testing of the tools in different settings and populations is in process. Funding: (no fund number) College of Nursing Research Office at University of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:18:13Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:18:13Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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