2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157891
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Maternal Report of Fetal Distress During Labor More Common in Induced Labors
Abstract:
Maternal Report of Fetal Distress During Labor More Common in Induced Labors
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2009
Author:Aaronson, Amanda C., RN, MSN
P.I. Institution Name:University of California, San Francisco, School of Nursing
Title:Doctoral Student
Contact Address:2 Koret Way, Dept. of Family Hlth Care Nursing, #N-411Y, Box 0606, San Francisco, CA, 94143-0602, USA
Contact Telephone:650-270-0252
Co-Authors:Caryl Gay, PhD; Kathryn Lee, RN, PhD, FAAN
Purpose: The purpose of this study is to describe the maternal perception of fetal distress with labor induction. Rationale: Little literature is available exploring labor inductions from the mother's perspective. Labor induction involves external chemical or physical measures to begin a non-spontaneous labor. Studies comparing and contrasting induction methods can be found, with risk for fetal distress as a commonly accepted outcome. Fetal distress is defined by an abnormal fetal heart rate on external monitoring. With fetal distress, however, there is also an increased likelihood of operative delivery, physical and emotional trauma, and postpartum depression. These maternal outcomes have not been adequately addressed in the literature. Methods: As part of a randomized clinical trial, data were collected among a sample of 152 primiparas. Information regarding labor and delivery experience was collected via phone interview, using a demographic information script. Responses were collected verbatim and transcribed into an SPSS data set and coded. Data about induction, cesarean delivery, labor and neonatal complications were all obtained by maternal report. Results: The sample was 148 moderately well educated women, with low-to-moderate income level, between 18-42 years of age, and 57% indicated that labors were induced. Of those inductions, methods used included artificial rupture of membranes, balloon catheter cervical dilation, prostaglandin insertion behind the cervix, or pitocin, IV drip. Of those inductions, fetal distress occurred in 24% of labors, whereas only 10% of spontaneous labors exhibited fetal distress (Chi Square=4.9, p=.027). Implications: These findings suggest that fetal distress in induced labor, as understood by the mother, occurs more frequently than in spontaneous labors. As there is a subsequent increased risk secondary to fetal distress of operative delivery, physical and emotional trauma, and post partum depression, new mothers who undergo induced labors should receive careful postpartum physical and emotional assessment. Funding: NIH Training grant (2 T32 NR007088-11, K. Lee, PI).
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMaternal Report of Fetal Distress During Labor More Common in Induced Laborsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157891-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Maternal Report of Fetal Distress During Labor More Common in Induced Labors</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Aaronson, Amanda C., RN, MSN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of California, San Francisco, School of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Doctoral Student</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">2 Koret Way, Dept. of Family Hlth Care Nursing, #N-411Y, Box 0606, San Francisco, CA, 94143-0602, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">650-270-0252</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">amanda.aaronson@ucsf.edu, amanda@hinkty.com</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Caryl Gay, PhD; Kathryn Lee, RN, PhD, FAAN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: The purpose of this study is to describe the maternal perception of fetal distress with labor induction. Rationale: Little literature is available exploring labor inductions from the mother's perspective. Labor induction involves external chemical or physical measures to begin a non-spontaneous labor. Studies comparing and contrasting induction methods can be found, with risk for fetal distress as a commonly accepted outcome. Fetal distress is defined by an abnormal fetal heart rate on external monitoring. With fetal distress, however, there is also an increased likelihood of operative delivery, physical and emotional trauma, and postpartum depression. These maternal outcomes have not been adequately addressed in the literature. Methods: As part of a randomized clinical trial, data were collected among a sample of 152 primiparas. Information regarding labor and delivery experience was collected via phone interview, using a demographic information script. Responses were collected verbatim and transcribed into an SPSS data set and coded. Data about induction, cesarean delivery, labor and neonatal complications were all obtained by maternal report. Results: The sample was 148 moderately well educated women, with low-to-moderate income level, between 18-42 years of age, and 57% indicated that labors were induced. Of those inductions, methods used included artificial rupture of membranes, balloon catheter cervical dilation, prostaglandin insertion behind the cervix, or pitocin, IV drip. Of those inductions, fetal distress occurred in 24% of labors, whereas only 10% of spontaneous labors exhibited fetal distress (Chi Square=4.9, p=.027). Implications: These findings suggest that fetal distress in induced labor, as understood by the mother, occurs more frequently than in spontaneous labors. As there is a subsequent increased risk secondary to fetal distress of operative delivery, physical and emotional trauma, and post partum depression, new mothers who undergo induced labors should receive careful postpartum physical and emotional assessment. Funding: NIH Training grant (2 T32 NR007088-11, K. Lee, PI).</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:18:16Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:18:16Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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