2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157892
Type:
Presentation
Title:
CPR Simulations: Results From a Pilot Study
Abstract:
CPR Simulations: Results From a Pilot Study
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2009
Author:Adamson, Katie A., MN, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Washington State University, Nursing
Title:Graduate Teaching Assistant
Contact Address:Nursing Building Room 414E, 412 E. Spokane Falls Blvd, Spokane, WA, 99202-2131, USA
Contact Telephone:360-320-0929
Co-Authors:Suzan Kardong-Edgren, Assistant Professor
Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate a group of second semester nursing students' retention of Basic Life Support skills and their ability to provide effective cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) in a simulated scenario. Background: Early high-quality CPR and defibrillation are associated with improved survival rates from cardiac arrest. Nurses are frequently the first to witness and respond to in-hospital cardiac arrests and therefore play an essential role in improving patient outcomes from cardiac arrest. However, research examining nurses' competence in performing high quality CPR has consistently shown deficits in this skill area. Methods: This pilot study was part of a larger study to evaluate learning outcomes between varying fidelity levels of human patient simulation. In the pilot study, groups of second semester nursing students participated in an acute coronary syndrome (ACS) simulation as part of their Nursing Practice in Acute and Chronic Illness course. All students had completed BLS for Healthcare Providers prior to entering the nursing program the previous semester. After the ACS lecture, 8 groups of 4 students participated in an ACS simulation with human patient simulators. The simulation culminated in the patient requiring CPR. The administrator of the scenario prompted the students by saying, "at this point the patient has stopped breathing." The scenarios were video taped and the tapes were used to collect data related to the students' performance of specific CPR and defibrillation skills. Results: None of the groups performed effective CPR as defined by the American Heart Association. One quarter of the groups correctly initiated the chain of survival by calling a code. None of the students correctly performed any of the key components of effective CPR: shake and shout the victim, give two breaths that enter the lungs, and provide chest compressions in the 30:2 ratio with correct hand placement. All of the groups correctly placed the AED pads on the patient and operated the AED correctly. Implications: Great emphasis is placed on ensuring that all nursing students are "card carrying" BLS providers; however there is mounting evidence that nursing students are not proficient in providing effective CPR. This could have tragic implications for patients who need CPR in the hospital. Therefore, improvements are needed in teaching and reinforcing CPR and resuscitation skills for nursing students. Further research is needed to determine what the best approach is to ensure acquisition and retention of CPR skills.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCPR Simulations: Results From a Pilot Studyen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157892-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">CPR Simulations: Results From a Pilot Study</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Adamson, Katie A., MN, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Washington State University, Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Graduate Teaching Assistant</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Nursing Building Room 414E, 412 E. Spokane Falls Blvd, Spokane, WA, 99202-2131, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">360-320-0929</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">kaadamson@wsu.edu, kadamson@u.washington.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Suzan Kardong-Edgren, Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate a group of second semester nursing students' retention of Basic Life Support skills and their ability to provide effective cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) in a simulated scenario. Background: Early high-quality CPR and defibrillation are associated with improved survival rates from cardiac arrest. Nurses are frequently the first to witness and respond to in-hospital cardiac arrests and therefore play an essential role in improving patient outcomes from cardiac arrest. However, research examining nurses' competence in performing high quality CPR has consistently shown deficits in this skill area. Methods: This pilot study was part of a larger study to evaluate learning outcomes between varying fidelity levels of human patient simulation. In the pilot study, groups of second semester nursing students participated in an acute coronary syndrome (ACS) simulation as part of their Nursing Practice in Acute and Chronic Illness course. All students had completed BLS for Healthcare Providers prior to entering the nursing program the previous semester. After the ACS lecture, 8 groups of 4 students participated in an ACS simulation with human patient simulators. The simulation culminated in the patient requiring CPR. The administrator of the scenario prompted the students by saying, &quot;at this point the patient has stopped breathing.&quot; The scenarios were video taped and the tapes were used to collect data related to the students' performance of specific CPR and defibrillation skills. Results: None of the groups performed effective CPR as defined by the American Heart Association. One quarter of the groups correctly initiated the chain of survival by calling a code. None of the students correctly performed any of the key components of effective CPR: shake and shout the victim, give two breaths that enter the lungs, and provide chest compressions in the 30:2 ratio with correct hand placement. All of the groups correctly placed the AED pads on the patient and operated the AED correctly. Implications: Great emphasis is placed on ensuring that all nursing students are &quot;card carrying&quot; BLS providers; however there is mounting evidence that nursing students are not proficient in providing effective CPR. This could have tragic implications for patients who need CPR in the hospital. Therefore, improvements are needed in teaching and reinforcing CPR and resuscitation skills for nursing students. Further research is needed to determine what the best approach is to ensure acquisition and retention of CPR skills.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:18:20Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:18:20Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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