2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157893
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Integrating Human Patient Simulation Into Nursing Curriculum
Abstract:
Integrating Human Patient Simulation Into Nursing Curriculum
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2009
Author:Adamson, Katie A., MN, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Washington State University Spokane, Nursing
Title:Graduate Teaching Assistant
Contact Address:Nursing Building Room 414E, P O Box 1495, Spokane, WA, 99210-1495, USA
Contact Telephone:360-320-0929
Purpose: 1) To describe the current human patient simulation (HPS) resources at community and technical colleges in. 2) To describe experiences, facilitators, barriers and incentives identified by nursing faculty at community and technical colleges related to the use of HPS. Background: Human patient simulation continues to gain importance in nursing education and nursing programs across the country are investing resources in equipment and training for human patient simulation. Experiences, successes and challenges should be measured, analyzed and shared to maximize the potential of this pedagogical approach. Methods: This study utilized 2 author-designed online surveys to explore the current HPS resources purchased by associate degree nursing programs in as well as the use of these resources by nursing faculty. Twenty-seven deans and directors of associate degree nursing programs in were contacted to ask if they would participate in the study and to get permission to contact the nursing faculty at their institution. Eleven participating deans/ directors or their designees were sent a survey about current resources, cost, faculty training and utilization of HPS resources at their institution. Seventy-six nursing faculty from participating institutions were sent a survey about their current use and knowledge of HPS, barriers or facilitators they identified related to integrating HPS into nursing courses, and opportunities they identified for improving the use of HPS at their institution and throughout nursing education. Results: Four deans/ directors of nursing or their designees responded to the survey about current resources, cost, faculty training and utilization of HPS at their institution and 24 nursing faculty responded to the survey about their current use and knowledge of HPS, barriers or facilitators related to integrating HPS into nursing courses, and opportunities for improving the use of HPS at their institution and throughout nursing education. The responses were analyzed and descriptive statistics were used to assess the baseline data from the surveys completed by the deans/ directors of nursing or their designees. The responses from the surveys completed by the nursing faculty were analyzed for themes. The survey responses indicated that nursing programs spent a disproportionately large amount of money on the initial investment in HPS equipment compared with the ongoing spending on maintenance and support for HPS. Nursing faculty identified barriers to integrating HPS into the courses they teach including lack of time, lack of support and lack of appropriate equipment. They identified facilitators to integrating HPS into the courses they teach including helpful and thorough training, individual initiative and support form colleagues and administrators. Finally, the faculty recommended incentives for improving the integration of HPS into the nursing curriculum including the provision of additional paid time for simulation, additional training, and additional support resources. Implications: Descriptions of the experiences of nursing faculty at community and technical colleges related to their use of HPS provided valuable data for beginning discussions about possible strategies for improving those experiences and maximizing investments made in HPS technology. Further research is needed to evaluate and optimize the integration of HPS into nursing curriculum. The surveys used in this study can now be revised and administered to a larger, more representative sample. This investigation will provide valuable data about what factors contribute to the success of HPS programs and will improve the future of nursing education and healthcare for our nation and world.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleIntegrating Human Patient Simulation Into Nursing Curriculumen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157893-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Integrating Human Patient Simulation Into Nursing Curriculum</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Adamson, Katie A., MN, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Washington State University Spokane, Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Graduate Teaching Assistant</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Nursing Building Room 414E, P O Box 1495, Spokane, WA, 99210-1495, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">360-320-0929</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">kaadamson@wsu.edu, kadamson@u.washington.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: 1) To describe the current human patient simulation (HPS) resources at community and technical colleges in. 2) To describe experiences, facilitators, barriers and incentives identified by nursing faculty at community and technical colleges related to the use of HPS. Background: Human patient simulation continues to gain importance in nursing education and nursing programs across the country are investing resources in equipment and training for human patient simulation. Experiences, successes and challenges should be measured, analyzed and shared to maximize the potential of this pedagogical approach. Methods: This study utilized 2 author-designed online surveys to explore the current HPS resources purchased by associate degree nursing programs in as well as the use of these resources by nursing faculty. Twenty-seven deans and directors of associate degree nursing programs in were contacted to ask if they would participate in the study and to get permission to contact the nursing faculty at their institution. Eleven participating deans/ directors or their designees were sent a survey about current resources, cost, faculty training and utilization of HPS resources at their institution. Seventy-six nursing faculty from participating institutions were sent a survey about their current use and knowledge of HPS, barriers or facilitators they identified related to integrating HPS into nursing courses, and opportunities they identified for improving the use of HPS at their institution and throughout nursing education. Results: Four deans/ directors of nursing or their designees responded to the survey about current resources, cost, faculty training and utilization of HPS at their institution and 24 nursing faculty responded to the survey about their current use and knowledge of HPS, barriers or facilitators related to integrating HPS into nursing courses, and opportunities for improving the use of HPS at their institution and throughout nursing education. The responses were analyzed and descriptive statistics were used to assess the baseline data from the surveys completed by the deans/ directors of nursing or their designees. The responses from the surveys completed by the nursing faculty were analyzed for themes. The survey responses indicated that nursing programs spent a disproportionately large amount of money on the initial investment in HPS equipment compared with the ongoing spending on maintenance and support for HPS. Nursing faculty identified barriers to integrating HPS into the courses they teach including lack of time, lack of support and lack of appropriate equipment. They identified facilitators to integrating HPS into the courses they teach including helpful and thorough training, individual initiative and support form colleagues and administrators. Finally, the faculty recommended incentives for improving the integration of HPS into the nursing curriculum including the provision of additional paid time for simulation, additional training, and additional support resources. Implications: Descriptions of the experiences of nursing faculty at community and technical colleges related to their use of HPS provided valuable data for beginning discussions about possible strategies for improving those experiences and maximizing investments made in HPS technology. Further research is needed to evaluate and optimize the integration of HPS into nursing curriculum. The surveys used in this study can now be revised and administered to a larger, more representative sample. This investigation will provide valuable data about what factors contribute to the success of HPS programs and will improve the future of nursing education and healthcare for our nation and world.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:18:23Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:18:23Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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