2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157896
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Recruitment Strategies for Video-Recorded Studies
Abstract:
Recruitment Strategies for Video-Recorded Studies
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2009
Author:Anderson, Laura M., BS
P.I. Institution Name:University of Utah, College of Nursing
Title:Research Assistant
Contact Address:10 South 2000 East, Salt Lake City, UT, 84108, USA
Contact Telephone:801-585-4285
Co-Authors:Margaret F. Clayton, PhD, APRN, Assistant Professor; Hannah P. Davidson, BS, Research Assistant
Purpose: The purpose of this project was to identify effective recruitment methods to enhance willingness of participants to be video-taped in a Family Practice setting. Rationale/Background: A comprehensive review of research that used video recording as the primary means of data collection reveals that detailed reporting of methods used for recruitment is lacking.  Further, the average non-participation rate reported in video-recorded studies was 19%. Patient reasons for refusal included patient time constraints, visits for emotional or gynecological problems, and embarrassment about being watched. Methods: This project was part of a larger research study conducted at two Family Practice Clinics, serving University employees as well as local underserved patients. Rapport with clinic personnel was initially achieved by visiting both clinics to explain the purpose of the research study and to discover staff ideas about how to minimize the impact of this study on clinic operations. Two nursing undergraduate research assistants recruited patients and providers for one month at each clinic. At the beginning of each day, a research assistant obtained written consent from the provider assigned to a camera ready examination room. If a provider refused participation, the research assistant worked with the medical assistants and nurse manager to consent a different provider. Next, the research assistant spoke to the providers - scheduled patients prior to their visit, explaining the study and obtaining written consent for videotaping. Outcomes: All but one eligible provider agreed to participate in the study (95%). Of 253 eligible patients approached, 18% refused to participate in the study. Of those that declined participation 47% did so because of the sensitive nature of their visit, 20% were uncomfortable being filmed, 10% did not meet study criteria (i.e. they were non English speaking, or under age 18), 10% reported time constraints, 10% gave no reason, and 22% gave miscellaneous reasons (such as fear that the insurance company may gain access to records, anger at the clinic, fear of becoming a ?statistic?). In addition, patients who waited longer than an hour in the waiting room were less willing to participate. Conclusion: Patient barriers to recruitment included visits of a sensitive nature (emotional and gynecological issues), and patient time constraints. We recruited patient participants with a patient centered, "opt-in" approach, emphasizing the value of their participation. Rapport with the clinic staff was a key component to successful recruitment of both patients and providers. At the end of the study a pizza lunch was provided for each clinic as a "thank you" and to promote future goodwill. Further, clinic managers were honored at a large local nursing honors banquet as a way of providing professional recognition for their contribution to this study. Future recommendations include achieving clinic personnel buy-in by being respectful of clinic patient flow and taking care not to disrupt clinic operations. An unexpected benefit of developing a relationship with clinic staff was that two Medical Assistants accepted an invitation to join a student nursing group and have since been admitted into an undergraduate nursing program. In summary, this study found that collaboration between clinic and research personnel enhanced patient and provider recruitment, paved the way for future collaboration, and even encouraged two people to adopt nursing as a career.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleRecruitment Strategies for Video-Recorded Studiesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157896-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Recruitment Strategies for Video-Recorded Studies</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Anderson, Laura M., BS</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Utah, College of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Research Assistant</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">10 South 2000 East, Salt Lake City, UT, 84108, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">801-585-4285</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">McGraw7767@yahoo.com</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Margaret F. Clayton, PhD, APRN, Assistant Professor; Hannah P. Davidson, BS, Research Assistant</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: The purpose of this project was to identify effective recruitment methods to enhance willingness of participants to be video-taped in a Family Practice setting. Rationale/Background: A comprehensive review of research that used video recording as the primary means of data collection reveals that detailed reporting of methods used for recruitment is lacking.&nbsp; Further, the average non-participation rate reported in video-recorded studies was 19%. Patient reasons for refusal included patient time constraints, visits for emotional or gynecological problems, and embarrassment about being watched. Methods: This project was part of a larger research study conducted at two Family Practice Clinics, serving University employees as well as local underserved patients. Rapport with clinic personnel was initially achieved by visiting both clinics to explain the purpose of the research study and to discover staff ideas about how to minimize the impact of this study on clinic operations. Two nursing undergraduate research assistants recruited patients and providers for one month at each clinic. At the beginning of each day, a research assistant obtained written consent from the provider assigned to a camera ready examination room. If a provider refused participation, the research assistant worked with the medical assistants and nurse manager to consent a different provider. Next, the research assistant spoke to the providers - scheduled patients prior to their visit, explaining the study and obtaining written consent for videotaping. Outcomes: All but one eligible provider agreed to participate in the study (95%). Of 253 eligible patients approached, 18% refused to participate in the study. Of those that declined participation 47% did so because of the sensitive nature of their visit, 20% were uncomfortable being filmed, 10% did not meet study criteria (i.e. they were non English speaking, or under age 18), 10% reported time constraints, 10% gave no reason, and 22% gave miscellaneous reasons (such as fear that the insurance company may gain access to records, anger at the clinic, fear of becoming a ?statistic?). In addition, patients who waited longer than an hour in the waiting room were less willing to participate. Conclusion: Patient barriers to recruitment included visits of a sensitive nature (emotional and gynecological issues), and patient time constraints. We recruited patient participants with a patient centered, &quot;opt-in&quot; approach, emphasizing the value of their participation. Rapport with the clinic staff was a key component to successful recruitment of both patients and providers. At the end of the study a pizza lunch was provided for each clinic as a &quot;thank you&quot; and to promote future goodwill. Further, clinic managers were honored at a large local nursing honors banquet as a way of providing professional recognition for their contribution to this study. Future recommendations include achieving clinic personnel buy-in by being respectful of clinic patient flow and taking care not to disrupt clinic operations. An unexpected benefit of developing a relationship with clinic staff was that two Medical Assistants accepted an invitation to join a student nursing group and have since been admitted into an undergraduate nursing program. In summary, this study found that collaboration between clinic and research personnel enhanced patient and provider recruitment, paved the way for future collaboration, and even encouraged two people to adopt nursing as a career.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:18:34Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:18:34Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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