2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157897
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Evaluation of Implementation Fidelity in an RN to BSN Program
Abstract:
Evaluation of Implementation Fidelity in an RN to BSN Program
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2009
Author:Anderson, Jocelyn, BSN, RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Washington Bothell, Nursing Program
Title:Master of Nursing Student
Contact Address:15739 6th Ave NE, Shoreline, WA, 98155, USA
Contact Telephone:206-365-3507
Background/Rationale: The University of Washington Bothell Nursing Program recently completed a complete curriculum revision of its RN to BSN program. As a large program offered on two sites, each core course is offered in multiple sections taught by different faculty.  Implementation fidelity is how accurately a program is delivered as it was intended. In evaluating the implementation fidelity of the new curriculum, it was important to assess how consistently the program and course objectives were being implemented across sections of the same core course taught by different instructors. A team of MN students in a graduate course on program planning, implementation and evaluation collaborated with faculty to accomplish this task Purpose: To evaluate the syllabi of the RN-BSN program for implementation fidelity of the new curriculum. Methods: The MN student evaluation team compared each syllabus with the specific core competencies that were to be addressed in that course. These competencies are based on the AACN Essentials for Baccalaureate Education for Professional Nursing Practice. The classes selected to be reviewed were new five credit core classes developed for the revised curriculum. Each course selected for review combined elements of more than one previously existing 3-credit core courses. The syllabi reviewed were from BNURS 350 (Critical Thinking in Nursing), BNURS 403 (Evidence Based Practice and Nursing Inquiry), BNURS 409 (Practicum with Populations in Community Health Settings), and BNURS 430 (Relational Leadership in Nursing). For each course, the team adapted and customized a worksheet that had been developed by RN-BSN faculty during their curriculum revision process. This worksheet cross-referenced the competencies in the AACN Essentials with their intended course location in the revised curriculum. The evaluation team compared if and how well the identified competencies were applied within the course objectives, assignments, readings, and class activities in each syllabus. Findings: After reviewing the syllabi, it was clear the instructors developed courses well aligned with the AACN competencies with only a few areas that need improvement. The limitation of the findings is that a review of a syllabus is by no means a conclusive review of a course. By reviewing a syllabus alone, there is no way to determine how each individual class conducts itself, how each assignment is presented in the class and the dynamics of each unique class and instructor. Conclusions/Implications: Assessing implementation fidelity in a program is an important step in outcome evaluation. Desired outcomes are linked to a program which is implemented true to its design. A more thorough evaluation of implementation fidelity could be pursued with a revision to the original worksheet used. In the future, using a Likert-type scale that address how strongly each essential is reflected in the syllabi with respect to class work, readings, assignments and other activities would allow for a more quantitative assessment of implementation fidelity.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEvaluation of Implementation Fidelity in an RN to BSN Programen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157897-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Evaluation of Implementation Fidelity in an RN to BSN Program</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Anderson, Jocelyn, BSN, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Washington Bothell, Nursing Program</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Master of Nursing Student</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">15739 6th Ave NE, Shoreline, WA, 98155, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">206-365-3507</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">gldngrrl@hotmail.com</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Background/Rationale: The University of Washington Bothell Nursing Program recently completed a complete curriculum revision of its RN to BSN program. As a large program offered on two sites, each core course is offered in multiple sections taught by different faculty.&nbsp; Implementation fidelity is how accurately a program is delivered as it was intended. In evaluating the implementation fidelity of the new curriculum, it was important to assess how consistently the program and course objectives were being implemented across sections of the same core course taught by different instructors. A team of MN students in a graduate course on program planning, implementation and evaluation collaborated with faculty to accomplish this task Purpose: To evaluate the syllabi of the RN-BSN program for implementation fidelity of the new curriculum. Methods: The MN student evaluation team compared each syllabus with the specific core competencies that were to be addressed in that course. These competencies are based on the AACN Essentials for Baccalaureate Education for Professional Nursing Practice. The classes selected to be reviewed were new five credit core classes developed for the revised curriculum. Each course selected for review combined elements of more than one previously existing 3-credit core courses. The syllabi reviewed were from BNURS 350 (Critical Thinking in Nursing), BNURS 403 (Evidence Based Practice and Nursing Inquiry), BNURS 409 (Practicum with Populations in Community Health Settings), and BNURS 430 (Relational Leadership in Nursing). For each course, the team adapted and customized a worksheet that had been developed by RN-BSN faculty during their curriculum revision process. This worksheet cross-referenced the competencies in the AACN Essentials with their intended course location in the revised curriculum. The evaluation team compared if and how well the identified competencies were applied within the course objectives, assignments, readings, and class activities in each syllabus. Findings: After reviewing the syllabi, it was clear the instructors developed courses well aligned with the AACN competencies with only a few areas that need improvement. The limitation of the findings is that a review of a syllabus is by no means a conclusive review of a course. By reviewing a syllabus alone, there is no way to determine how each individual class conducts itself, how each assignment is presented in the class and the dynamics of each unique class and instructor. Conclusions/Implications: Assessing implementation fidelity in a program is an important step in outcome evaluation. Desired outcomes are linked to a program which is implemented true to its design. A more thorough evaluation of implementation fidelity could be pursued with a revision to the original worksheet used. In the future, using a Likert-type scale that address how strongly each essential is reflected in the syllabi with respect to class work, readings, assignments and other activities would allow for a more quantitative assessment of implementation fidelity.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:18:37Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:18:37Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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