Lived Experience of Advance Care Planning for Women With Cancer: A Transcultural Study

11.00
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157898
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Lived Experience of Advance Care Planning for Women With Cancer: A Transcultural Study
Abstract:
Lived Experience of Advance Care Planning for Women With Cancer: A Transcultural Study
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2009
Author:Asakura, Yuki, RN, MS, CNS, PhDc
P.I. Institution Name:University of Colorado, College of Nursing
Title:PhD candidate
Contact Address:1255 19th Street #906, Denver, CO, 80202, USA
Contact Telephone:720-217-9819
Background and Purpose: Cancer is a leading cause of death in Japan and the second in the US. Despite of the WHO's recommendation of introducing palliative care (PC) at the time of cancer diagnosis, palliative care is not utilized early enough in the US or Japan. Research on palliative care is frequently limited to end of life care. Advance care planning (ACP) is a tailored discussion on how a patient would like to be treated in case he/she is unable to express his/her wishes. As a person's wishes are not static, ACP needs to be revised as a patient's wishes change. Yet, in reality, failure to develop ACP is commonly caused by late referral to PC. Thus, introducing ACP at the early stages of cancer is vital. Cultural perspectives are essential to understanding PC; nevertheless current knowledge of cultural aspects of practice are limited. Further, exhaustive descriptions of patients' perspectives and experiences with ACP are lacking. The purpose of this study is to describe lived experience of rural and urban-dwelling cancer patients in the US and Japan toward ACP and PC to enhance cultural consideration and to identify universal themes. Method: This study utilizes ethnography informed by phenomenology. As cultural perspectives are essential to develop tailored care plans for the patients, utilizing ethnography facilitates discovery of cultural perspectives. The design of this study is ethnography informed by phenomenology to gain a cross-cultural understanding of lived experience of cancer patients. Recruitment: Participants are recruited from four different settings: Denver metro area, rural Colorado, Tokyo (urban) and Kochi & Yamagata (rural), Japan. Total sample size is up to 24 adults ranging in age from 21 to 65 years with a variety of new cancer diagnoses. Data Collection and Analysis: Following informed consent, two audiotaped interviews are conducted with participants for up to one hour each. Observations and field notes will be recorded during and after the interviews. If a participant is interested in, additional thoughts can be emailed to the researcher. Audio-recorded data will be transcribed, and identifiable data will be changed to pseudonyms. A qualitative software Atlas ti is used for data management. Cultural themes and universal themes are identified in the data and organized to produce a rich description of the lived experience of ACP and PC for Japanese and American adults with cancer. To ensure the credibility, experts in PC and cancer care will be consulted and several sources of data will further insure trustworthy findings. Significance of Proposed Study: To promote early introduction of PC, understanding of patients' perception and acceptance of ACP is necessary. Knowledge of patients' comfort level to discuss their critical situation will be identified and urban and rural differences noted. Profound understanding of lived experience and cultural implications are crucial to development of quality nursing care with this population. Lived experience is wholly respected in PC and transcultural aspects are not known. This knowledge obtained from this study will inform the direction of PC and ACP for people in the early stages of cancer.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleLived Experience of Advance Care Planning for Women With Cancer: A Transcultural Studyen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157898-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Lived Experience of Advance Care Planning for Women With Cancer: A Transcultural Study</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Asakura, Yuki, RN, MS, CNS, PhDc</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Colorado, College of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">PhD candidate</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">1255 19th Street #906, Denver, CO, 80202, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">720-217-9819</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">Yuki.Asakura@uchsc.edu, ayuki56@yahoo.com</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Background and Purpose: Cancer is a leading cause of death in Japan and the second in the US. Despite of the WHO's recommendation of introducing palliative care (PC) at the time of cancer diagnosis, palliative care is not utilized early enough in the US or Japan. Research on palliative care is frequently limited to end of life care. Advance care planning (ACP) is a tailored discussion on how a patient would like to be treated in case he/she is unable to express his/her wishes. As a person's wishes are not static, ACP needs to be revised as a patient's wishes change. Yet, in reality, failure to develop ACP is commonly caused by late referral to PC. Thus, introducing ACP at the early stages of cancer is vital. Cultural perspectives are essential to understanding PC; nevertheless current knowledge of cultural aspects of practice are limited. Further, exhaustive descriptions of patients' perspectives and experiences with ACP are lacking. The purpose of this study is to describe lived experience of rural and urban-dwelling cancer patients in the US and Japan toward ACP and PC to enhance cultural consideration and to identify universal themes. Method: This study utilizes ethnography informed by phenomenology. As cultural perspectives are essential to develop tailored care plans for the patients, utilizing ethnography facilitates discovery of cultural perspectives. The design of this study is ethnography informed by phenomenology to gain a cross-cultural understanding of lived experience of cancer patients. Recruitment: Participants are recruited from four different settings: Denver metro area, rural Colorado, Tokyo (urban) and Kochi &amp; Yamagata (rural), Japan. Total sample size is up to 24 adults ranging in age from 21 to 65 years with a variety of new cancer diagnoses. Data Collection and Analysis: Following informed consent, two audiotaped interviews are conducted with participants for up to one hour each. Observations and field notes will be recorded during and after the interviews. If a participant is interested in, additional thoughts can be emailed to the researcher. Audio-recorded data will be transcribed, and identifiable data will be changed to pseudonyms. A qualitative software Atlas ti is used for data management. Cultural themes and universal themes are identified in the data and organized to produce a rich description of the lived experience of ACP and PC for Japanese and American adults with cancer. To ensure the credibility, experts in PC and cancer care will be consulted and several sources of data will further insure trustworthy findings. Significance of Proposed Study: To promote early introduction of PC, understanding of patients' perception and acceptance of ACP is necessary. Knowledge of patients' comfort level to discuss their critical situation will be identified and urban and rural differences noted. Profound understanding of lived experience and cultural implications are crucial to development of quality nursing care with this population. Lived experience is wholly respected in PC and transcultural aspects are not known. This knowledge obtained from this study will inform the direction of PC and ACP for people in the early stages of cancer.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:18:40Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:18:40Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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