2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157899
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Of Sage, Mesquite and Vast Horizons: Answers to Unasked Questions
Abstract:
Of Sage, Mesquite and Vast Horizons: Answers to Unasked Questions
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2009
Author:Averill, Jennifer B., PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:The University of New Mexico, College of Nursing
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:MSC09 5350, 2502 Marble, NE, Albuquerque, NM, 87131-0001, USA
Contact Telephone:505-272-0859
Purposes/Aims: The aims of a recent rural health study were to analyze indicators of health disparities for multicultural rural elders in the southwestern US, and to construct preliminary explanatory models based on elders' definitions of health and their perceptions of resilience, hardiness, and vitality in a harsh environment. Overall study findings are addressed elsewhere in the literature. The purpose of this paper is to focus on explanatory models arising from the elders themselves. Rationale/Conceptual Basis/Background: Growing numbers of multicultural elders living near the US-Mexican border suffer health disparities related to geography, economics, cultural/historical patterns, and social isolation. Integrating these contexts, the study was conceptually based on Stringer's Look-Think-Act partnership model, aiming to establish consensus on priorities for future action. In the course of the work, alongside responses to research questions, elders' life stories directed attention to unasked questions about promoting their health, autonomy and well-being. The elders' tales represent a critical voice in planning potential interventions. Design and Methods: Combining critical ethnography and community-based partnership research (CBPR), methods included ethnographic interviews with 64 informants in three rural counties, participant observation, archival data review, photography, dialectic/negotiation, and consensus-building. Data were analyzed using sequential coding, thematic analysis, narrative analysis, and matrix analysis. During the interactions, rich chronicles of rural life in early-mid 20th century New Mexico yielded insights valuable not only to particular family legacies, but also to health care providers and researchers. Results/Findings: Themes derived from analysis of elders' accounts centered on crossing the international border for a better life; adherence to core values; and preserving connections to family and the land. These key explanatory components suggested the following unasked questions as: (1) What historical and cultural factors contribute to elders' values of autonomy, hardiness, diligence, persistence, and finding joy? (2) What advice should be given to younger family members and to today's health care providers and planners? Implications: In the current, uncertain contexts of economics and health care, CBPR models may reduce disparities by including local voices in the analysis and resolution of problems, potentially increasing the probability of success for interventions. Additionally, qualitative/ethnographic evidence enriches the knowledge base for healthy aging in rural communities, and for effective, culturally relevant EBP and outcomes research.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleOf Sage, Mesquite and Vast Horizons: Answers to Unasked Questionsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157899-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Of Sage, Mesquite and Vast Horizons: Answers to Unasked Questions</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Averill, Jennifer B., PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">The University of New Mexico, College of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">MSC09 5350, 2502 Marble, NE, Albuquerque, NM, 87131-0001, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">505-272-0859</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">javerill@salud.unm.edu, javerill@comcast.net</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purposes/Aims: The aims of a recent rural health study were to analyze indicators of health disparities for multicultural rural elders in the southwestern US, and to construct preliminary explanatory models based on elders' definitions of health and their perceptions of resilience, hardiness, and vitality in a harsh environment. Overall study findings are addressed elsewhere in the literature. The purpose of this paper is to focus on explanatory models arising from the elders themselves. Rationale/Conceptual Basis/Background: Growing numbers of multicultural elders living near the US-Mexican border suffer health disparities related to geography, economics, cultural/historical patterns, and social isolation. Integrating these contexts, the study was conceptually based on Stringer's Look-Think-Act partnership model, aiming to establish consensus on priorities for future action. In the course of the work, alongside responses to research questions, elders' life stories directed attention to unasked questions about promoting their health, autonomy and well-being. The elders' tales represent a critical voice in planning potential interventions. Design and Methods: Combining critical ethnography and community-based partnership research (CBPR), methods included ethnographic interviews with 64 informants in three rural counties, participant observation, archival data review, photography, dialectic/negotiation, and consensus-building. Data were analyzed using sequential coding, thematic analysis, narrative analysis, and matrix analysis. During the interactions, rich chronicles of rural life in early-mid 20th century New Mexico yielded insights valuable not only to particular family legacies, but also to health care providers and researchers. Results/Findings: Themes derived from analysis of elders' accounts centered on crossing the international border for a better life; adherence to core values; and preserving connections to family and the land. These key explanatory components suggested the following unasked questions as: (1) What historical and cultural factors contribute to elders' values of autonomy, hardiness, diligence, persistence, and finding joy? (2) What advice should be given to younger family members and to today's health care providers and planners? Implications: In the current, uncertain contexts of economics and health care, CBPR models may reduce disparities by including local voices in the analysis and resolution of problems, potentially increasing the probability of success for interventions. Additionally, qualitative/ethnographic evidence enriches the knowledge base for healthy aging in rural communities, and for effective, culturally relevant EBP and outcomes research.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:18:44Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:18:44Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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