2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157902
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Universalist Approach to Cross-Cultural Translation of Health Surveys
Abstract:
Universalist Approach to Cross-Cultural Translation of Health Surveys
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2009
Author:Baker, Dian L., PhD(c), APRN-BC, PNP
P.I. Institution Name:California State University, Sacramento, Nursing
Title:Lecturer
Contact Address:6000 J Street, Sacramento, CA, 95819-6096, USA
Contact Telephone:530-400-2866
Specific Aim: To develop a culturally-sensitive and linguistically-appropriate Hmong translation of the Searching for Hardships and Obstacles to Shots instrument using a community based participatory research approach (CBPR). Background: Immunization (IZ) remains one of the most effective methods for prevention of serious infectious diseases and prevention of liver and cervical cancer arising from persistent viral infections. The incidence of both these cancers can be significantly lowered through immunization. The Hmong in California face high rates of vaccine-preventable cervical and liver cancer. However, there is currently little or no information available to identify specific barriers to IZ in the Hmong community. The Searching for Hardships and Obstacles to Shots (SHOTS) instrument, developed in 2007 by Dr. Victoria Niederhauser, is a community-based psychometric tool that measures parental barriers to immunization. The SHOTS instrument is one tool the Hmong community may use to understand parental perceptions of barriers to obtaining immunizations for their children. Methods: Using a community-based participatory research approach, Herdman, Fox-Rushby, and Badia's universalist six-step process was used to ensure an effective and culturally sensitive translation process. Jones et al. adaptation of Brislin's translation method and cognitive interviewing were used for instrument translation. Two data sets were collected to test the Hmong version; a bilingual group divided into those taking the survey in English (BLE, n=72) and those taking the survey in Hmong (BLH, n=72), and a Hmong only group (H, n=58) to assess ease of administration. Results: Cronbach's alpha reliability coefficient demonstrated internal consistency for each group (BLE and BLH =.956 each data set; H = .914). Two-sample Kolmogorov-Smirnov test validated the appropriateness of the survey translation with no differences between bilingual respondents whether they took the survey in English or Hmong (two sample K-S D range from .084 to 1.171; p range (asym, 2-tailed) from .129 to 1.00). Implications: The translation process of the SHOTS instrument into Hmong used an integrated CBPR approach combining iterative communication in a community-based partnership with the Herdman et al. universalist approach to health survey translation. By using such approaches, the Hmong translation of the SHOTS instrument provides a strong and reliable tool that the Hmong community may use to plan for future interventions related to improving immunization rates that can potentially reduce the burden of serious infections and vaccine-preventable cancer.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleUniversalist Approach to Cross-Cultural Translation of Health Surveysen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157902-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Universalist Approach to Cross-Cultural Translation of Health Surveys</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Baker, Dian L., PhD(c), APRN-BC, PNP</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">California State University, Sacramento, Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Lecturer</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">6000 J Street, Sacramento, CA, 95819-6096, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">530-400-2866</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">dibaker@csus.edu, bakerdian@gmail.com</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Specific Aim: To develop a culturally-sensitive and linguistically-appropriate Hmong translation of the Searching for Hardships and Obstacles to Shots instrument using a community based participatory research approach (CBPR). Background: Immunization (IZ) remains one of the most effective methods for prevention of serious infectious diseases and prevention of liver and cervical cancer arising from persistent viral infections. The incidence of both these cancers can be significantly lowered through immunization. The Hmong in California face high rates of vaccine-preventable cervical and liver cancer. However, there is currently little or no information available to identify specific barriers to IZ in the Hmong community. The Searching for Hardships and Obstacles to Shots (SHOTS) instrument, developed in 2007 by Dr. Victoria Niederhauser, is a community-based psychometric tool that measures parental barriers to immunization. The SHOTS instrument is one tool the Hmong community may use to understand parental perceptions of barriers to obtaining immunizations for their children. Methods: Using a community-based participatory research approach, Herdman, Fox-Rushby, and Badia's universalist six-step process was used to ensure an effective and culturally sensitive translation process. Jones et al. adaptation of Brislin's translation method and cognitive interviewing were used for instrument translation. Two data sets were collected to test the Hmong version; a bilingual group divided into those taking the survey in English (BLE, n=72) and those taking the survey in Hmong (BLH, n=72), and a Hmong only group (H, n=58) to assess ease of administration. Results: Cronbach's alpha reliability coefficient demonstrated internal consistency for each group (BLE and BLH =.956 each data set; H = .914). Two-sample Kolmogorov-Smirnov test validated the appropriateness of the survey translation with no differences between bilingual respondents whether they took the survey in English or Hmong (two sample K-S D range from .084 to 1.171; p range (asym, 2-tailed) from .129 to 1.00). Implications: The translation process of the SHOTS instrument into Hmong used an integrated CBPR approach combining iterative communication in a community-based partnership with the Herdman et al. universalist approach to health survey translation. By using such approaches, the Hmong translation of the SHOTS instrument provides a strong and reliable tool that the Hmong community may use to plan for future interventions related to improving immunization rates that can potentially reduce the burden of serious infections and vaccine-preventable cancer.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:18:54Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:18:54Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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