2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157903
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Promoting Safety in Long-Term Care: A Review of Long-Term Care Facility Deaths
Abstract:
Promoting Safety in Long-Term Care: A Review of Long-Term Care Facility Deaths
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2009
Author:Baker, Margaret W., PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Washington School of Nursing, Biobehavioral Nursing
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:1959 NE Pacific Street, Box 357266, Seattle, WA, 98195-7266, USA
Contact Telephone:206-616-5345
Co-Authors:Richard Harruff, MD, PhD, Chief Medical Examiner; Dylan Mart, Research Assistant
Background/Significance: At any given time in the U.S., there are approximately 1.6 million people in nursing homes (NHs) and one million people in community-based long-term care (LTC). The prevalence of elder mistreatment (EM) in institutional settings is unknown, but thought to be widespread and serious. Abuse or neglect may be missed when suspicious circumstances and/or reportable conditions are not reported to the medical examiner (ME) or coroner as required by law. Many healthcare and criminal justice professionals have concerns that the contribution of EM to LTC facility deaths is being missed. Unidentified EM has implications not only for seeking redress for the decedent and their loved ones, but for safety and quality of care for the living. Purpose and Specific Aims: The purpose of this study is to describe and analyze medicolegal characteristics and contextual factors of LTC facility deaths in King County (KC) WA in 2005. Specific aims are to 1) describe resident and facility characteristics and reporting circumstances of LTC facility deaths, 2) identify potential forensic markers of EM associated with these deaths, and 3) examine relationships between potential forensic markers and resident, facility, and reporting characteristics. Conceptual Framework: The study is conducted using a risk and vulnerability conceptual framework, wherein risk includes potentially stressful factors in the environment and vulnerability represents individual factors that predict or explain a person?s ability to adapt to environmental stressors. In this study, risk will be evaluated through analysis of facility characteristics and (death) reporting circumstances. Vulnerability will be evaluated through analysis of resident characteristics. Methods: The study design is non-experimental and involves a retrospective record review. The sample consists of approximately 1,844 eligible cases of LTC deaths of residents age 65-and-over reported to the KCME in 2005. Of that sample, the ME assumed jurisdiction in 74 cases. Data sources include a limited data set from the KCMEO, file records for cases in which the ME assumed jurisdiction, and publicly available federal and state nursing home and hospice survey data. Results will be presented. Contribution to nursing theory and practice: This study contributes to nursing theory by adding to an emerging portfolio of EM studies using a "risk and vulnerability" framework. The study contributes to nursing practice by increasing knowledge, awareness, and skills in EM primary prevention; improving secondary prevention through enhanced recognition, reporting, and medicolegal investigation; and, enhancing tertiary prevention by informing changes in practice guidelines, regulatory responses, and public policy.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePromoting Safety in Long-Term Care: A Review of Long-Term Care Facility Deathsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157903-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Promoting Safety in Long-Term Care: A Review of Long-Term Care Facility Deaths</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Baker, Margaret W., PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Washington School of Nursing, Biobehavioral Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">1959 NE Pacific Street, Box 357266, Seattle, WA, 98195-7266, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">206-616-5345</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">mwbaker@u.washington.edu, mwbaker@ihmail.com</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Richard Harruff, MD, PhD, Chief Medical Examiner; Dylan Mart, Research Assistant</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Background/Significance: At any given time in the U.S., there are approximately 1.6 million people in nursing homes (NHs) and one million people in community-based long-term care (LTC). The prevalence of elder mistreatment (EM) in institutional settings is unknown, but thought to be widespread and serious. Abuse or neglect may be missed when suspicious circumstances and/or reportable conditions are not reported to the medical examiner (ME) or coroner as required by law. Many healthcare and criminal justice professionals have concerns that the contribution of EM to LTC facility deaths is being missed. Unidentified EM has implications not only for seeking redress for the decedent and their loved ones, but for safety and quality of care for the living. Purpose and Specific Aims: The purpose of this study is to describe and analyze medicolegal characteristics and contextual factors of LTC facility deaths in King County (KC) WA in 2005. Specific aims are to 1) describe resident and facility characteristics and reporting circumstances of LTC facility deaths, 2) identify potential forensic markers of EM associated with these deaths, and 3) examine relationships between potential forensic markers and resident, facility, and reporting characteristics. Conceptual Framework: The study is conducted using a risk and vulnerability conceptual framework, wherein risk includes potentially stressful factors in the environment and vulnerability represents individual factors that predict or explain a person?s ability to adapt to environmental stressors. In this study, risk will be evaluated through analysis of facility characteristics and (death) reporting circumstances. Vulnerability will be evaluated through analysis of resident characteristics. Methods: The study design is non-experimental and involves a retrospective record review. The sample consists of approximately 1,844 eligible cases of LTC deaths of residents age 65-and-over reported to the KCME in 2005. Of that sample, the ME assumed jurisdiction in 74 cases. Data sources include a limited data set from the KCMEO, file records for cases in which the ME assumed jurisdiction, and publicly available federal and state nursing home and hospice survey data. Results will be presented. Contribution to nursing theory and practice: This study contributes to nursing theory by adding to an emerging portfolio of EM studies using a &quot;risk and vulnerability&quot; framework. The study contributes to nursing practice by increasing knowledge, awareness, and skills in EM primary prevention; improving secondary prevention through enhanced recognition, reporting, and medicolegal investigation; and, enhancing tertiary prevention by informing changes in practice guidelines, regulatory responses, and public policy.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:18:58Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:18:58Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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