2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157904
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Assessing Mentoring Experiences and Expectations Among Nurse Practitioners
Abstract:
Assessing Mentoring Experiences and Expectations Among Nurse Practitioners
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2009
Author:Balk, Julie P., DNP, FNP-BC
P.I. Institution Name:Westminster College, School of Nursing and Health Sciences
Title:Assistant Professor/Family Nurse Practitioner
Contact Address:6611 South Benecia Drive, Salt Lake City, UT, 84121, USA
Contact Telephone:801-913-7882
Purpose: The purpose of this project was to complete a needs assessment focused on exploring, identifying and understanding Utah Nurse Practitioners (UNP) members? mentoring needs, experiences, and expectations. Background: As nurse practitioners (NPs) graduate and transition from the academic setting to independent clinical practice, a tumultuous role transition takes place. The role of the nurse practitioner is multi-faceted, complex and extends well beyond the role of the registered nurse creating multiple role transitions and professional challenges. Little information exists in the literature regarding mentoring needs, experiences, and expectations of NPs across the range of years of experience. Methods: A convenience sample was utilized of nurse practitioners who are current members of Utah Nurse Practitioners, Inc., with recruitment through current UNP email list. The study design was a cross sectional, descriptive research design, predominantly quantitative, with a qualitative adjunct. The needs assessment questionnaire was completed in September 2008 through SurveyMonkey, online, to address the mentoring experiences and expectations among nurse practitioners in. Data analysis is descriptive, including both quantitative and qualitative analysis. Results: Overall the majority of mentee (87.2%) and mentor (80.4%) experiences were reported as positive. Positive experiences identified by mentees included support, encouragement, patient and practice management, and development of the professional role. Negative experiences as a mentee were reported by 19.1% of respondents and included mentors who were not supportive or did not understand the NP role. Positive experiences as a mentor were reported (80.4%) and included personal satisfaction and the ability to teach patient management and give professional advice. Negative mentoring experiences were reported by 40.4% of respondents and focused on the time requirements of mentoring as well as mentor/mentee relationship issues. Many respondents reported difficulty with role transition and cited lack of preparation, confidence and support as contributing to this challenge. Two respondents (4.8%) reported feeling confident to assume the new role of nurse practitioner. Forty of respondents (85.1%) felt that a mentoring program for NPs would be helpful and the majority would be willing to act as a mentor. Implications: As NP's continue to provide primary care services for an increasing number of Americans, support for post graduate mentoring programs will be necessary. In 2003, 25% of the NP graduates had less than 5 years experience and less than 10% of graduates reported feeling well prepared to assume the role of the NP. Assessing and identifying mentoring needs is important, as funding is sought to facilitate development of new mentoring programs.  Understanding the needs of newer NP graduates as well as the experiences of the more seasoned NP will help foster creation of valuable mentoring programs. These programs can facilitate successful role transition and contribute to the addition of necessary human resources to address the shortage of primary care providers in the today.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAssessing Mentoring Experiences and Expectations Among Nurse Practitionersen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157904-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Assessing Mentoring Experiences and Expectations Among Nurse Practitioners</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Balk, Julie P., DNP, FNP-BC</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Westminster College, School of Nursing and Health Sciences</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor/Family Nurse Practitioner</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">6611 South Benecia Drive, Salt Lake City, UT, 84121, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">801-913-7882</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">jbalk@westminstercollege.edu, jpbslc@gmail.com</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: The purpose of this project was to complete a needs assessment focused on exploring, identifying and understanding Utah Nurse Practitioners (UNP) members? mentoring needs, experiences, and expectations. Background: As nurse practitioners (NPs) graduate and transition from the academic setting to independent clinical practice, a tumultuous role transition takes place. The role of the nurse practitioner is multi-faceted, complex and extends well beyond the role of the registered nurse creating multiple role transitions and professional challenges. Little information exists in the literature regarding mentoring needs, experiences, and expectations of NPs across the range of years of experience. Methods: A convenience sample was utilized of nurse practitioners who are current members of Utah Nurse Practitioners, Inc., with recruitment through current UNP email list. The study design was a cross sectional, descriptive research design, predominantly quantitative, with a qualitative adjunct. The needs assessment questionnaire was completed in September 2008 through SurveyMonkey, online, to address the mentoring experiences and expectations among nurse practitioners in. Data analysis is descriptive, including both quantitative and qualitative analysis. Results: Overall the majority of mentee (87.2%) and mentor (80.4%) experiences were reported as positive. Positive experiences identified by mentees included support, encouragement, patient and practice management, and development of the professional role. Negative experiences as a mentee were reported by 19.1% of respondents and included mentors who were not supportive or did not understand the NP role. Positive experiences as a mentor were reported (80.4%) and included personal satisfaction and the ability to teach patient management and give professional advice. Negative mentoring experiences were reported by 40.4% of respondents and focused on the time requirements of mentoring as well as mentor/mentee relationship issues. Many respondents reported difficulty with role transition and cited lack of preparation, confidence and support as contributing to this challenge. Two respondents (4.8%) reported feeling confident to assume the new role of nurse practitioner. Forty of respondents (85.1%) felt that a mentoring program for NPs would be helpful and the majority would be willing to act as a mentor. Implications: As NP's continue to provide primary care services for an increasing number of Americans, support for post graduate mentoring programs will be necessary. In 2003, 25% of the NP graduates had less than 5 years experience and less than 10% of graduates reported feeling well prepared to assume the role of the NP. Assessing and identifying mentoring needs is important, as funding is sought to facilitate development of new mentoring programs.&nbsp; Understanding the needs of newer NP graduates as well as the experiences of the more seasoned NP will help foster creation of valuable mentoring programs. These programs can facilitate successful role transition and contribute to the addition of necessary human resources to address the shortage of primary care providers in the today.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:19:01Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:19:01Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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