2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157905
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Effective Translation of Barcode Medication Administration into Practice
Abstract:
Effective Translation of Barcode Medication Administration into Practice
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2009
Author:Barker, Kerry, RN, BS
P.I. Institution Name:Timpanogos Regional Hospital, Education
Title:Clinical Educator/eMAR Coordinator
Contact Address:750 West 800 North, Orem, UT, 84057, USA
Contact Telephone:801-714-6023
Co-Authors:Tron Carlton, RN, PhDc, Instructor; RuthAnn Jarvis, RN, MSN/ED, Director of Education
Purpose/Aim: Since the release of the Institute of Medicine report in 2000, hospitals have focused on creating systems that improve quality patient care and reduce the incidence of medication errors. Barcoded medication administration (BCMA) systems have been introduced in hospitals throughout the country which support and improve quality, patient safety, and have been shown to reduce medication errors. However, encouraging nursing staff to embrace this innovative technology and change nursing practice related to medication administration has been challenging for many hospitals. The purpose of this study is to discuss the process of implementing BCMA at a community hospital, identify changes in nursing practice and behaviors with compliance surveillance, and report outcomes after successful implementation. Background: Research has indicated on average, a hospitalized patient is subject to an error in medication administration each day with at least 25% of all medication errors deemed preventable (of, 2004). Exploring ways to reduce medication errors and other adverse drug events has become a national priority. Administration of medication is a complex process involving physicians, pharmacists, and nurses with the administration of medication process focused on the nurse. Over a third of all medication errors occur during medication administration to patients by nursing staff. Barcoded medication administration (BCMA) systems have helped to alleviate such errors by creating systems of double and cross checking of the entire medication administration process. However, these systems are only effective with successful implementation and adherence to protocols and policies governing the process and use of BCMA systems by nursing staff. Effective translation of BCMA into nursing practice based upon evidence includes creation and understanding of support system, staff education, implementation, and follow up for compliance monitoring. Methods: Using evidence based in implementation science, a community hospital established new policies, protocols, and practice standards to govern this change. Staff education helped to establish new practice expectations. Data was collected pre and post implementation to measure effectiveness of intervention related to outcomes in medication administration. Compliance to new expectations continues to be measured and communicated to nursing staff. Results: Significant differences and improvement have been noted between pre and post implementation and compliance with BCMA system resulted in reduced medication errors, reduced adverse drug events, and increased patient safety with medication administration process. Continued education of newly hired nurses and monitoring feedback helps to strengthen and reinforce this process. Implications: BCMA can be successfully implemented if evidence is used to assist in implementation process. Medication administration can continue to become a safe practice if attention is focused on continued follow-up and compliance feedback to nursing staff.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEffective Translation of Barcode Medication Administration into Practiceen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157905-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Effective Translation of Barcode Medication Administration into Practice</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Barker, Kerry, RN, BS</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Timpanogos Regional Hospital, Education</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Clinical Educator/eMAR Coordinator</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">750 West 800 North, Orem, UT, 84057, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">801-714-6023</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">Kerry.Barker@Mountainstarhealth.com</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Tron Carlton, RN, PhDc, Instructor; RuthAnn Jarvis, RN, MSN/ED, Director of Education</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose/Aim: Since the release of the Institute of Medicine report in 2000, hospitals have focused on creating systems that improve quality patient care and reduce the incidence of medication errors. Barcoded medication administration (BCMA) systems have been introduced in hospitals throughout the country which support and improve quality, patient safety, and have been shown to reduce medication errors. However, encouraging nursing staff to embrace this innovative technology and change nursing practice related to medication administration has been challenging for many hospitals. The purpose of this study is to discuss the process of implementing BCMA at a community hospital, identify changes in nursing practice and behaviors with compliance surveillance, and report outcomes after successful implementation. Background: Research has indicated on average, a hospitalized patient is subject to an error in medication administration each day with at least 25% of all medication errors deemed preventable (of, 2004). Exploring ways to reduce medication errors and other adverse drug events has become a national priority. Administration of medication is a complex process involving physicians, pharmacists, and nurses with the administration of medication process focused on the nurse. Over a third of all medication errors occur during medication administration to patients by nursing staff. Barcoded medication administration (BCMA) systems have helped to alleviate such errors by creating systems of double and cross checking of the entire medication administration process. However, these systems are only effective with successful implementation and adherence to protocols and policies governing the process and use of BCMA systems by nursing staff. Effective translation of BCMA into nursing practice based upon evidence includes creation and understanding of support system, staff education, implementation, and follow up for compliance monitoring.&nbsp;Methods: Using evidence based in implementation science, a community hospital established new policies, protocols, and practice standards to govern this change. Staff education helped to establish new practice expectations. Data was collected pre and post implementation to measure effectiveness of intervention related to outcomes in medication administration. Compliance to new expectations continues to be measured and communicated to nursing staff. Results: Significant differences and improvement have been noted between pre and post implementation and compliance with BCMA system resulted in reduced medication errors, reduced adverse drug events, and increased patient safety with medication administration process. Continued education of newly hired nurses and monitoring feedback helps to strengthen and reinforce this process. Implications: BCMA can be successfully implemented if evidence is used to assist in implementation process. Medication administration can continue to become a safe practice if attention is focused on continued follow-up and compliance feedback to nursing staff.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:19:05Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:19:05Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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