2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157910
Type:
Presentation
Title:
How Caregivers Deal With Pain and Distress in Second Stage Labor
Abstract:
How Caregivers Deal With Pain and Distress in Second Stage Labor
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2009
Author:Bergstrom, Linda, CNM, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Utah, College of Nursing
Title:Associate Professor (Clinical)
Contact Address:10 South 2000 East, Salt Lake City, UT, 84112, USA
Contact Telephone:801-585-9622
Co-Authors:Janice Morse, RN, PhD, FAAN, Professor; Lori Richards, BS, Research Assistant; Joyce E. Roberts, CNM, PhD, FAAN, FACNM, Professor
Purpose/ aims: To describe how laboring women and their caregivers interacted and negotiated care when pain or distress existed in second stage labor. Pain occurred during labor contractions, and distress (an emotional response to pain) manifested primarily between contractions. Background: Morse's praxis theory of comfort was used as the theoretical framework. During trauma and urgent care, providing comfort is depicted as a cyclical process, which is always patient-led and initiated when the caregiver recognizes the patient's comfort need. The caregiver responds with comfort strategies , evaluates the resulting care and modifies it as needed. Method: Secondary qualitative analysis of video data using conversational and observational methods. Results: Four patterns of women's behavior were identified: 1) no pain or distress, 2) low-level pain and/or distress, 3) focused working, and 4) severe pain and/or distress. Several patterned sequences of distress were described. Successful care was identified as enabling the woman to maintain herself in any state other than severe pain and/or distress. Particular modes of speech used by the caregiver (i.e., ordinary birth talk), enabled the attainment of successful care when the woman was not in severe pain or distress. When problem states existed, innovative care giving transitioned the woman to another state. Successful intervention strategies included 1) giving innovative directions and 2) "talking down." Implications: In the presence of high levels of pain or distress, the repertoire of ordinary birth talk, used primarily during contractions with a focus upon maternal bearing down, was inadequate to help move a woman from a problematic state to a goal state. Women needed additional help to get themselves back into control. A large repertoire of possible techniques is necessary for caregivers to be effective with a wide variety of laboring styles, and especially for women who have moved into severe pain and/or distress states.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleHow Caregivers Deal With Pain and Distress in Second Stage Laboren_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157910-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">How Caregivers Deal With Pain and Distress in Second Stage Labor</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Bergstrom, Linda, CNM, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Utah, College of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor (Clinical)</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">10 South 2000 East, Salt Lake City, UT, 84112, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">801-585-9622</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">linda.bergstrom@nurs.utah.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Janice Morse, RN, PhD, FAAN, Professor; Lori Richards, BS, Research Assistant; Joyce E. Roberts, CNM, PhD, FAAN, FACNM, Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose/ aims: To describe how laboring women and their caregivers interacted and negotiated care when pain or distress existed in second stage labor. Pain occurred during labor contractions, and distress (an emotional response to pain) manifested primarily between contractions. Background: Morse's praxis theory of comfort was used as the theoretical framework. During trauma and urgent care, providing comfort is depicted as a cyclical process, which is always patient-led and initiated when the caregiver recognizes the patient's comfort need. The caregiver responds with comfort strategies , evaluates the resulting care and modifies it as needed. Method: Secondary qualitative analysis of video data using conversational and observational methods. Results: Four patterns of women's behavior were identified: 1) no pain or distress, 2) low-level pain and/or distress, 3) focused working, and 4) severe pain and/or distress. Several patterned sequences of distress were described. Successful care was identified as enabling the woman to maintain herself in any state other than severe pain and/or distress. Particular modes of speech used by the caregiver (i.e., ordinary birth talk), enabled the attainment of successful care when the woman was not in severe pain or distress. When problem states existed, innovative care giving transitioned the woman to another state. Successful intervention strategies included 1) giving innovative directions and 2) &quot;talking down.&quot; Implications: In the presence of high levels of pain or distress, the repertoire of ordinary birth talk, used primarily during contractions with a focus upon maternal bearing down, was inadequate to help move a woman from a problematic state to a goal state. Women needed additional help to get themselves back into control. A large repertoire of possible techniques is necessary for caregivers to be effective with a wide variety of laboring styles, and especially for women who have moved into severe pain and/or distress states.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:19:22Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:19:22Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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