2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157912
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Transition, Education, Experience and Care at Home
Abstract:
Transition, Education, Experience and Care at Home
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2009
Author:Bisgaard, Robin, RN, MSN
P.I. Institution Name:UCSF School of Nursing, Department of Family Health Care
Title:Doctoral student
Contact Address:14 Pearce St, Petaluma, CA, 94952, USA
Contact Telephone:707 953 8791
Co-Authors:Roberta Rehm, RN, PhD, Associate Professor
Purpose: 1. Explore and analyze the meaning of the transition home for the first time for parents of infants with technology dependence or medical fragility. 2. Identify successes and challenges as parents prepare for home and once they are home 2. Describe strategies to improve the transition home from the NICU. Background and Significance: More infants than ever are surviving the neonatal period and are discharged home with complex conditions that require ongoing skilled care and monitoring. This care is most often provided by parents. Parents in the NICU experience many physical and emotional challenges and must become competent in providing the care needed at home. Subjects/Design: Parents of sixteen infants were interviewed prior to discharge home and again at home after 1-2 months. The NICU is a busy 51 bed tertiary teaching facility. The infants required ongoing care including technology and sophisticated monitoring of conditions at home. Methods: An ethnographic field study based on a Symbolic Interaction framework utilizes in-depth interviews and participant observation. Open-ended interviews were conducted with the parents in the NICU within 48 hours of discharge and again at home after 1-2 months. Analysis includes summaries, coding, development of categories and over-arching themes, and document analysis. Results: The Neonatal Intensive Care Nursery experience for parents is often a roller coaster ride of emotions and experiences across the continuum of the hospitalization. The fast paced, highly technical environment of the NICU provides life sustaining support of the infant yet as discharge approaches, the environment is also where the family is educated regarding the ongoing condition and special care required at home. Little consideration is given to the parent readiness to learn during the hospitalization. Parents experienced moments of panic when equipment and medications were not the same as those used in the hospital.   Regular visiting, providing hands on care and learning the individualized care their infant will need over a period of time versus in a rushed environment were identified as helpful strategies in the learning process and transition home. Implications: Increased awareness of the parent experience and learner readiness can help guide the timing and appropriateness of parent education and training regarding the care of the infant. The discharge process should include anticipation of the home environment, equipment, supplies and medication in the hospital education process. Anticipating the technology and real life experiences including travel are areas where nurses can educate parents for a smooth transition home. Parents also need anticipatory guidance regarding the normal aspects of the transition to home.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleTransition, Education, Experience and Care at Homeen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157912-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Transition, Education, Experience and Care at Home</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Bisgaard, Robin, RN, MSN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">UCSF School of Nursing, Department of Family Health Care</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Doctoral student</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">14 Pearce St, Petaluma, CA, 94952, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">707 953 8791</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">robinbisgaard@sbcglobal.net, robin.bisgaard@ucsfme</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Roberta Rehm, RN, PhD, Associate Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: 1. Explore and analyze the meaning of the transition home for the first time for parents of infants with technology dependence or medical fragility. 2. Identify successes and challenges as parents prepare for home and once they are home 2. Describe strategies to improve the transition home from the NICU. Background and Significance: More infants than ever are surviving the neonatal period and are discharged home with complex conditions that require ongoing skilled care and monitoring. This care is most often provided by parents. Parents in the NICU experience many physical and emotional challenges and must become competent in providing the care needed at home. Subjects/Design: Parents of sixteen infants were interviewed prior to discharge home and again at home after 1-2 months. The NICU is a busy 51 bed tertiary teaching facility. The infants required ongoing care including technology and sophisticated monitoring of conditions at home. Methods: An ethnographic field study based on a Symbolic Interaction framework utilizes in-depth interviews and participant observation. Open-ended interviews were conducted with the parents in the NICU within 48 hours of discharge and again at home after 1-2 months. Analysis includes summaries, coding, development of categories and over-arching themes, and document analysis. Results: The Neonatal Intensive Care Nursery experience for parents is often a roller coaster ride of emotions and experiences across the continuum of the hospitalization. The fast paced, highly technical environment of the NICU provides life sustaining support of the infant yet as discharge approaches, the environment is also where the family is educated regarding the ongoing condition and special care required at home. Little consideration is given to the parent readiness to learn during the hospitalization. Parents experienced moments of panic when equipment and medications were not the same as those used in the hospital.&nbsp; &nbsp;Regular visiting, providing hands on care and learning the individualized care their infant will need over a period of time versus in a rushed environment were identified as helpful strategies in the learning process and transition home. Implications: Increased awareness of the parent experience and learner readiness can help guide the timing and appropriateness of parent education and training regarding the care of the infant. The discharge process should include anticipation of the home environment, equipment, supplies and medication in the hospital education process. Anticipating the technology and real life experiences including travel are areas where nurses can educate parents for a smooth transition home. Parents also need anticipatory guidance regarding the normal aspects of the transition to home.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:19:29Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:19:29Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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