2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157916
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Safety Culture Multidisciplinary Teamwork and Communication Interventions
Abstract:
Safety Culture Multidisciplinary Teamwork and Communication Interventions
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2009
Author:Blegen, Mary A., RN, PhD, FAAN
P.I. Institution Name:University of California San Francisco, Community Health Systems
Title:Professor
Contact Address:2 Koret #0608, San Francisco, CA, 94143, USA
Contact Telephone:415-476-2599
Co-Authors:Brian Alldredge, PharmD, Professor; Susan Gearhart, Doctoral Student; Niraj Sehgal, MD, MPH, Assistant Professor; Robert Wachter, MD, Professor
Purpose/Aim: This purpose of this project was to determine whether a multidisciplinary intervention could improve perceptions of patient safety culture on medical units in three hospitals. Background:  Following the Institute of Medicine reports on the safety and quality of healthcare, descriptions of patient safety culture, its importance in protecting patients, and the role it plays in potentially improving patient care emerged. Failure in two aspects of safety culture, teamwork and communication, is a widely reported cause of patient harm. Our hypothesis is that if providers practiced more effective teamwork and communication, safety culture would improve and errors would decrease. Methods: This project was designed, implemented, and evaluated by a multidisciplinary leadership team (nursing, pharmacy, medicine) assisted by champions from each discipline in each hospital. Team training sessions and a unit based safety team were implemented. Evaluation for the project included measuring safety culture before the intervention and then one year later. We used the Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture (HSOPC) from AHRQ for this purpose. Results: The HSOPC survey was administered to 454 healthcare staff in 3 hospitals before and after the multidisciplinary interventions. Respondents included nurses, physicians, pharmacists, and other hospital staff members. The increases in scores from pre to post intervention were statistically significant (p<.05) for 10 dimensions: Teamwork within units, Supervisor/manager expectation, Hospital management support, Organizational learning, Overall perceptions of safety, Error feedback and communication, Communication openness, Teamwork across units, Hospital handoffs and transitions, and Non-punitive response to error. Implications: The need to change the patient safety culture in healthcare is widely accepted. However, there is still skepticism about the potential for culture change; and, methods for bringing this about are debated. The interventions in this project systematically ensured that all training activities were multidisciplinary, that they addressed the concerns that these providers had on their units, and that they were maintained over time. This approach did have an impact on Safety Climate.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSafety Culture Multidisciplinary Teamwork and Communication Interventionsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157916-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Safety Culture Multidisciplinary Teamwork and Communication Interventions</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Blegen, Mary A., RN, PhD, FAAN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of California San Francisco, Community Health Systems</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">2 Koret #0608, San Francisco, CA, 94143, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">415-476-2599</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">Mary.Blegen@nursing.ucsf.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Brian Alldredge, PharmD, Professor; Susan Gearhart, Doctoral Student; Niraj Sehgal, MD, MPH, Assistant Professor; Robert Wachter, MD, Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose/Aim: This purpose of this project was to determine whether a multidisciplinary intervention could improve perceptions of patient safety culture on medical units in three hospitals. Background:&nbsp; Following the Institute of Medicine reports on the safety and quality of healthcare, descriptions of patient safety culture, its importance in protecting patients, and the role it plays in potentially improving patient care emerged. Failure in two aspects of safety culture, teamwork and communication, is a widely reported cause of patient harm. Our hypothesis is that if providers practiced more effective teamwork and communication, safety culture would improve and errors would decrease. Methods: This project was designed, implemented, and evaluated by a multidisciplinary leadership team (nursing, pharmacy, medicine) assisted by champions from each discipline in each hospital. Team training sessions and a unit based safety team were implemented. Evaluation for the project included measuring safety culture before the intervention and then one year later. We used the Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture (HSOPC) from AHRQ for this purpose. Results: The HSOPC survey was administered to 454 healthcare staff in 3 hospitals before and after the multidisciplinary interventions. Respondents included nurses, physicians, pharmacists, and other hospital staff members. The increases in scores from pre to post intervention were statistically significant (p&lt;.05) for 10 dimensions: Teamwork within units, Supervisor/manager expectation, Hospital management support, Organizational learning, Overall perceptions of safety, Error feedback and communication, Communication openness, Teamwork across units, Hospital handoffs and transitions, and Non-punitive response to error. Implications: The need to change the patient safety culture in healthcare is widely accepted. However, there is still skepticism about the potential for culture change; and, methods for bringing this about are debated. The interventions in this project systematically ensured that all training activities were multidisciplinary, that they addressed the concerns that these providers had on their units, and that they were maintained over time. This approach did have an impact on Safety Climate.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:19:42Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:19:42Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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