2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157920
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Experiencing an Acute Myocardial Infarction
Abstract:
Experiencing an Acute Myocardial Infarction
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2009
Author:Bond, A. Eaine, DNSc, APRN, CCRN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Jordan, Faculty of Nursing
Title:Director, PhD Program
Contact Address:, Amman, 11942, Jordan
Contact Telephone:962-79-638-3782
Co-Authors:Nidal Farid Eshah, MSc, PhDc, RN
Purposes/Aims: This Qualitative Literature Review aimed to explore patients' perspectives related to their experience after an Acute Myocardial Infarction (AMI). Rationale/Conceptual Basis/Background: Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the number one killer in many countries. For instance, it accounts for 34% of female mortality, and 43% of male mortality in Jordan. AMI is one of the manifestations of CVD that affects large sectors of people. Improved care in recent years has left many patients with residual affects. Understanding the meaning and responses of experiencing AMI, is a vital requirement for designing educational sessions for preventing a second AMI, as well as for developing rehabilitation programs. Methods: The authors performed a review of the following electronic databases: CINAHL, MEDLINE, Blackwell Synergy, and PsycINFO. Inclusion criteria included Qualitative articles from peer-reviewed journals, published in English, between 2002 and 2007. Key words were: Acute Myocardial Infarction, lifestyle changes, lived experience, meaning of myocardial infarction, patient's needs, and qualitative research. Thirteen articles met the criteria, and were approved by both authors. Data were analyzed according to the Miles and Huberman (1994) technique. Results: Six key themes were identified: expectation about causes of the disease; behaviors related to the event; moving toward changing lifestyles; professional and social support; views about the future; and expressing needs. Findings also revealed a great misunderstanding about causes, treatments, and long-term consequences of an AMI among the study participants. Additionally, participants identified major defects in educating, preparing, and supporting AMI victims. Implications: Survivors of AMI continue to suffer from its consequences after they return home. Such suffering is exacerbated by a lack of knowledge, poor preparation, lack of productive communication with health care workers, plus lack of follow-up and professional support. Health promotion programs, health education programs, discharge planning, professional follow-up, and supporting systems need to be re-examined, redesigned, and employed more effectively.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleExperiencing an Acute Myocardial Infarctionen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157920-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Experiencing an Acute Myocardial Infarction</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Bond, A. Eaine, DNSc, APRN, CCRN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Jordan, Faculty of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Director, PhD Program</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">, Amman, 11942, Jordan</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">962-79-638-3782</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">Elaine_Bond@BYU.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Nidal Farid Eshah, MSc, PhDc, RN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purposes/Aims: This Qualitative Literature Review aimed to explore patients' perspectives related to their experience after an Acute Myocardial Infarction (AMI). Rationale/Conceptual Basis/Background: Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the number one killer in many countries. For instance, it accounts for 34% of female mortality, and 43% of male mortality in Jordan. AMI is one of the manifestations of CVD that affects large sectors of people. Improved care in recent years has left many patients with residual affects. Understanding the meaning and responses of experiencing AMI, is a vital requirement for designing educational sessions for preventing a second AMI, as well as for developing rehabilitation programs. Methods: The authors performed a review of the following electronic databases: CINAHL, MEDLINE, Blackwell Synergy, and PsycINFO. Inclusion criteria included Qualitative articles from peer-reviewed journals, published in English, between 2002 and 2007. Key words were: Acute Myocardial Infarction, lifestyle changes, lived experience, meaning of myocardial infarction, patient's needs, and qualitative research. Thirteen articles met the criteria, and were approved by both authors. Data were analyzed according to the Miles and Huberman (1994) technique. Results: Six key themes were identified: expectation about causes of the disease; behaviors related to the event; moving toward changing lifestyles; professional and social support; views about the future; and expressing needs. Findings also revealed a great misunderstanding about causes, treatments, and long-term consequences of an AMI among the study participants. Additionally, participants identified major defects in educating, preparing, and supporting AMI victims. Implications: Survivors of AMI continue to suffer from its consequences after they return home. Such suffering is exacerbated by a lack of knowledge, poor preparation, lack of productive communication with health care workers, plus lack of follow-up and professional support. Health promotion programs, health education programs, discharge planning, professional follow-up, and supporting systems need to be re-examined, redesigned, and employed more effectively.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:19:56Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:19:56Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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