2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157921
Type:
Presentation
Title:
End of Life Care Practices and Quality of Life: An Integrative Review
Abstract:
End of Life Care Practices and Quality of Life: An Integrative Review
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2009
Author:Bond, A. Elaine, DNSc, APRN, CCRN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Jordan, Faculty of Nursing
Title:Director, PhD Program
Contact Address:, Amman, 11942, Jordan
Contact Telephone:96279-638-3782
Co-Authors:Khaldoun Hamdan, MSC, PhD Student
Purposes/ Aims: The aim of this review was to determine End of Life Care (EOLC) practices for terminally ill patients in relation to the quality of their lives. Rational/ Conceptual Basis/ Background: Caring for patients has changed dramatically over the last decades; trends shifted from the abstract meaning of providing medical care toward humane and sensitive nursing approaches in applying desired treatments. EOLC is one of the emerging modalities that focuses on the care of patients with non-curative diseases. Special care and knowledge are needed to improve the quality of their lives, ensuring peaceful and comforting moments at the end of life for the patients and their families. Methods: Research articles from peer- reviewed journals, published in English, between 2002 and 2007, were identified, using MedLine, Science Direct, and EBESCO data bases. The keywords: EOLC, satisfaction with treatment and hospital care. Results: The six reviewed articles showed that many end-of-life patients continued to receive life sustaining treatments, such as blood tests, antibiotics, and artificial nutrition. Many patients did not receive adequate pain medications, thus they experienced impaired performance status and consequently significant lower levels of quality of care. Patients with Do Not Resuscitate (DNR) orders rated the quality of care and satisfaction with treatment less favorably than patients without DNR orders. They also gave lower ratings for the quality of their interpersonal interactions with their health care providers. Implications: It is important for nurses to understand the meanings of EOLC and DNR, which do not mean failure to treat the patient. Rather, they require nurses to redirect nursing efforts toward purposeful and realistic actions, such as providing comfort measures and pain relief. More awareness is needed for the embodiment of the DNR concept, which may mean medical treatment withdrawal for patients at the end of life, while changing into cultural and statutory concerns to improve patients' quality of life in the last phases of their lives.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEnd of Life Care Practices and Quality of Life: An Integrative Reviewen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157921-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">End of Life Care Practices and Quality of Life: An Integrative Review</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Bond, A. Elaine, DNSc, APRN, CCRN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Jordan, Faculty of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Director, PhD Program</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">, Amman, 11942, Jordan</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">96279-638-3782</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">Elaine_Bond@BYU.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Khaldoun Hamdan, MSC, PhD Student</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purposes/ Aims: The aim of this review was to determine End of Life Care (EOLC) practices for terminally ill patients in relation to the quality of their lives. Rational/ Conceptual Basis/ Background: Caring for patients has changed dramatically over the last decades; trends shifted from the abstract meaning of providing medical care toward humane and sensitive nursing approaches in applying desired treatments. EOLC is one of the emerging modalities that focuses on the care of patients with non-curative diseases. Special care and knowledge are needed to improve the quality of their lives, ensuring peaceful and comforting moments at the end of life for the patients and their families. Methods: Research articles from peer- reviewed journals, published in English, between 2002 and 2007, were identified, using MedLine, Science Direct, and EBESCO data bases. The keywords: EOLC, satisfaction with treatment and hospital care. Results: The six reviewed articles showed that many end-of-life patients continued to receive life sustaining treatments, such as blood tests, antibiotics, and artificial nutrition. Many patients did not receive adequate pain medications, thus they experienced impaired performance status and consequently significant lower levels of quality of care. Patients with Do Not Resuscitate (DNR) orders rated the quality of care and satisfaction with treatment less favorably than patients without DNR orders. They also gave lower ratings for the quality of their interpersonal interactions with their health care providers. Implications: It is important for nurses to understand the meanings of EOLC and DNR, which do not mean failure to treat the patient. Rather, they require nurses to redirect nursing efforts toward purposeful and realistic actions, such as providing comfort measures and pain relief. More awareness is needed for the embodiment of the DNR concept, which may mean medical treatment withdrawal for patients at the end of life, while changing into cultural and statutory concerns to improve patients' quality of life in the last phases of their lives.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:20:00Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:20:00Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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