2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157925
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Psychosocial Work Factors and Shoulder Pain in Hotel Room Cleaners
Abstract:
Psychosocial Work Factors and Shoulder Pain in Hotel Room Cleaners
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2009
Author:Burgel, Barbara J., RN, ANP, PhD, FAAN
P.I. Institution Name:UCSF School of Nursing, Dept of Community Health Systems
Title:Clinical Professor
Contact Address:2 Koret Way, N505Y, San Francisco, CA, 94143-0608, USA
Contact Telephone:415-476-4953
Co-Authors:Marion Gillen, RN, MPH, PhD, Associate Professor; Niklas Krause, MD, PhD, MPH, Associate Professor of Medicine; Mary White RN, MPH, PhD, Professor
Aims: To determine, among hotel room cleaners, if there was a relationship between psychosocial work factors [job strain, iso-strain, and effort-reward imbalance (ERI)] and severe shoulder pain, after controlling for selected socio-demographic, behavioral, anthropometric, biomechanical, and hotel factors. Background: Hotel room cleaners have physically demanding jobs that place them at high risk for work-related shoulder pain (WRSP). Biomechanical factors have been associated with a high prevalence of WRSP.  Psychosocial work factors, such as job strain (high psychological demand in combination with low decision latitude) iso-strain (job strain with low coworker and supervisor support), and ERI (high effort with low rewards), may also play a role in WRSP. Little is known about psychosocial work factors and WRSP in this primarily female, immigrant, low wage group of cleaners. Methods:  941 of 1,276 (74%) eligible hotel room cleaners from 5 unionized hotels in Las Vegas completed a questionnaire survey in 2002.  Of this sample, 493 with complete data for the shoulder pain outcome, the 3 key psychosocial independent variables (job strain, iso-strain and ERI), and 17 covariates were included in logistic analyses using Stata, Version 9.2. Results: Fifty-six percent (n=274) reported severe shoulder pain in the prior 4-weeks. The sample was primarily female (98%), Latina (78%), married/partnered (69%), born outside of the USA (85%), with an average age of 41.18 (SD 9.67). On average, participants had worked as a room cleaner 7.74 (SD 5.41) years, 40.26 hours (SD 11.00) per week, and made 19.35 beds/day (SD 6.72).  In fully adjusted models, job strain and iso-strain were not associated with severe shoulder pain. ERI was significantly associated with severe shoulder pain: Those with an ERI score greater than 1.0 had 3 times the odds of reporting severe shoulder pain, after adjusting for age, years of education, care giving at home, current smoking and alcohol, height, number of years worked as a room cleaner, number of hours worked/week, number of beds made/day, physical workload, and work intensification and ergonomic indices (adjusted odds ratio 2.98, 95% CI 1.93-4.59, p=0.000). Implications for the discipline of nursing: These findings will aid occupational health professionals in developing "healthy work" policies to prevent WRSP. Creative job design and an enhanced reward system for hotel room cleaners may help to achieve a better balance between effort and rewards of work.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePsychosocial Work Factors and Shoulder Pain in Hotel Room Cleanersen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157925-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Psychosocial Work Factors and Shoulder Pain in Hotel Room Cleaners</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Burgel, Barbara J., RN, ANP, PhD, FAAN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">UCSF School of Nursing, Dept of Community Health Systems</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Clinical Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">2 Koret Way, N505Y, San Francisco, CA, 94143-0608, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">415-476-4953</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">BARBARA.BURGEL@NURSING.UCSF.EDU</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Marion Gillen, RN, MPH, PhD, Associate Professor; Niklas Krause, MD, PhD, MPH, Associate Professor of Medicine; Mary White RN, MPH, PhD, Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Aims: To determine, among hotel room cleaners, if there was a relationship between psychosocial work factors [job strain, iso-strain, and effort-reward imbalance (ERI)] and severe shoulder pain, after controlling for selected socio-demographic, behavioral, anthropometric, biomechanical, and hotel factors. Background: Hotel room cleaners have physically demanding jobs that place them at high risk for work-related shoulder pain (WRSP). Biomechanical factors have been associated with a high prevalence of WRSP.&nbsp; Psychosocial work factors, such as job strain (high psychological demand in combination with low decision latitude) iso-strain (job strain with low coworker and supervisor support), and ERI (high effort with low rewards), may also play a role in WRSP. Little is known about psychosocial work factors and WRSP in this primarily female, immigrant, low wage group of cleaners. Methods:&nbsp;&nbsp;941 of 1,276 (74%) eligible hotel room cleaners from 5 unionized hotels in Las Vegas completed a questionnaire survey in 2002.&nbsp; Of this sample, 493 with complete data for the shoulder pain outcome, the 3 key psychosocial independent variables (job strain, iso-strain and ERI), and 17 covariates were included in logistic analyses using Stata, Version 9.2. Results:&nbsp;Fifty-six percent (n=274) reported severe shoulder pain in the prior 4-weeks. The sample was primarily female (98%), Latina (78%), married/partnered (69%), born outside of the USA (85%), with an average age of 41.18 (SD 9.67). On average, participants had worked as a room cleaner 7.74 (SD 5.41) years, 40.26 hours (SD 11.00) per week, and made 19.35 beds/day (SD 6.72).&nbsp; In fully adjusted models, job strain and iso-strain were not associated with severe shoulder pain. ERI was significantly associated with severe shoulder pain: Those with an ERI score greater than 1.0 had 3 times the odds of reporting severe shoulder pain, after adjusting for age, years of education, care giving at home, current smoking and alcohol, height, number of years worked as a room cleaner, number of hours worked/week, number of beds made/day, physical workload, and work intensification and ergonomic indices (adjusted odds ratio 2.98, 95% CI 1.93-4.59, p=0.000).&nbsp;Implications for the discipline of nursing:&nbsp;These findings will aid occupational health professionals in developing &quot;healthy work&quot; policies to prevent WRSP. Creative job design and an enhanced reward system for hotel room cleaners may help to achieve a better balance between effort and rewards of work.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:20:14Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:20:14Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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