2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157927
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Symposium Overview Abstract: Session 1071
Abstract:
Symposium Overview Abstract: Session 1071
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2009
Author:Butterfield, Patricia G., PhD, RN, FAAN
P.I. Institution Name:InterCollegiate College of Nursing
Title:Dean & Professor
Contact Address:2917 W Fort George Wright D, Spokane, WA, 99224, USA
Contact Telephone:509-324-7332
Co-Authors:Laura S. Larsson, PhD, MPH, BS, Assistant Professor
Differential environmental exposures are experienced by families, particularly poor and minority families, in the places they live, work, and play. Rural communities are a differential community of concern, as they experience higher levels of exposure (both in frequency and magnitude) to many environmental stressors and have fewer resources to manage these exposures than their urban counterparts. Relative risk and health status may further amplify exposure suggesting the importance of a combination of compositional and contextual factors in environmental health (EH) outcomes. One fundamental focus of environmental health nursing is to promote indoor risk reduction, yet nursing research with the aim of assessing the efficacy of nursing interventions to reduce EH risk was without a well-fitting theoretical framework. In response to this gap in nursing theory, the Translational Environmental Risk Reduction in Rural Areas (TERRA) model was developed. One aim of this symposium is to describe the unique theoretical contributions of the TERRA model including that the authors: (1) specifically applied a vulnerable populations interrelationship model to rural families combining important elements of rural and health disparities theories; (2) included both compositional and contextual macro determinants of EH, which reflects the importance of place in rural intervention research; and (3) expanded traditional socioeconomic determinants in their conceptualization of inequities. The second aim of this symposium is to present findings from the Environmental Risk Reduction through Nursing Interventions and Education (ERRNIE) project as they relate to the TERRA model. The ERRNIE project is a randomized controlled trial with the primary aim to evaluate the effectiveness of a public health nurse delivered intervention designed to improve household environmental risk reduction behaviors. Study sites exist in Gallatin County Montana and Whatcom County Washington. Dr. Butterfield will provide a brief history of the ERRNIE study and describe the factors that led her team to develop the TERRA conceptual framework. Dr. Larsson will report on cross-sectional research on sociodemographic and mental model variables important for predicting radon risk reduction behavior. Dr. Hill will discuss risk perception as a salient variable in public health messaging as well as share empirical risk perception findings from the ERRNIE study. Dr. Postma will discuss the nursing intervention element of the TERRA model with findings from public health nurses regarding their readiness, acceptance, and confidence level to deliver risk reduction strategies to rural, low-income families during visits to their homes.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSymposium Overview Abstract: Session 1071en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157927-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Symposium Overview Abstract: Session 1071</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Butterfield, Patricia G., PhD, RN, FAAN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">InterCollegiate College of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Dean &amp; Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">2917 W Fort George Wright D, Spokane, WA, 99224, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">509-324-7332</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">pbutter@ad.wsu.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Laura S. Larsson, PhD, MPH, BS, Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Differential environmental exposures are experienced by families, particularly poor and minority families, in the places they live, work, and play. Rural communities are a differential community of concern, as they experience higher levels of exposure (both in frequency and magnitude) to many environmental stressors and have fewer resources to manage these exposures than their urban counterparts. Relative risk and health status may further amplify exposure suggesting the importance of a combination of compositional and contextual factors in environmental health (EH) outcomes. One fundamental focus of environmental health nursing is to promote indoor risk reduction, yet nursing research with the aim of assessing the efficacy of nursing interventions to reduce EH risk was without a well-fitting theoretical framework. In response to this gap in nursing theory, the Translational Environmental Risk Reduction in Rural Areas (TERRA) model was developed. One aim of this symposium is to describe the unique theoretical contributions of the TERRA model including that the authors: (1) specifically applied a vulnerable populations interrelationship model to rural families combining important elements of rural and health disparities theories; (2) included both compositional and contextual macro determinants of EH, which reflects the importance of place in rural intervention research; and (3) expanded traditional socioeconomic determinants in their conceptualization of inequities. The second aim of this symposium is to present findings from the Environmental Risk Reduction through Nursing Interventions and Education (ERRNIE) project as they relate to the TERRA model. The ERRNIE project is a randomized controlled trial with the primary aim to evaluate the effectiveness of a public health nurse delivered intervention designed to improve household environmental risk reduction behaviors. Study sites exist in Gallatin County Montana and Whatcom County Washington. Dr. Butterfield will provide a brief history of the ERRNIE study and describe the factors that led her team to develop the TERRA conceptual framework. Dr. Larsson will report on cross-sectional research on sociodemographic and mental model variables important for predicting radon risk reduction behavior. Dr. Hill will discuss risk perception as a salient variable in public health messaging as well as share empirical risk perception findings from the ERRNIE study. Dr. Postma will discuss the nursing intervention element of the TERRA model with findings from public health nurses regarding their readiness, acceptance, and confidence level to deliver risk reduction strategies to rural, low-income families during visits to their homes.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:20:21Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:20:21Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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