2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157929
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Becoming Mothers and Fathers
Abstract:
Becoming Mothers and Fathers
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2009
Author:Callister, Lynn Clark, RN, PhD, FAAN
P.I. Institution Name:Brigham Young University, College of Nursing
Title:Professor
Contact Address:136 SWKT, Brigham Young University, Provo, UT, 84602, USA
Contact Telephone:801-422-3227
Co-Authors:Lindsay Hickock, RN, BSN; Tawny Thomas, Student Nurse; Katri Vehvilainen-Julkunen, CNM, PhD, Professor
Purpose: The purpose of this descriptive study was to describe the perceptions of American childbearing couples about their birth experience, the provision of health care, and making the transition to parenthood. The study is part of a global comparative study. Background: There is currently literature documenting maternal perceptions of childbirth, and a growing body of knowledge of paternal perspectives. However, no international comparative studies of maternal/paternal perspectives on becoming parents were found in the literature or study of childbearing couples' perceptions of the provision of health care. It has been recommended that cross cultural comparisons of childbearing couples should be made, and the need identified for further inquiry. Method: A convenience sample of 94 couples 18-45 years of age who had given birth to their first child during the past twelve months completed maternal and paternal surveys developed by a Finnish nurse researcher who is the principal investigator. In addition, couples answered open-ended questions. Data were analyzed as appropriate for qualitative inquiry. Qualitative findings will be reported in this presentation. Findings: Themes emerging from the data include: (a) giving birth as a transcendent life event; (b) feeling positive about birth when health care providers demonstrated respect and provided individualized supportive care; (c) facilitating paternal involvement; and (d) needing more parental education across the childbearing year. One mother said, "Care providers need to assure women they can do anything and that their bodies were made to give birth. Laboring women need lots of support. If a woman is able to birth in the way she wants, she feels empowered and strong." One father said, "Being at my son's birth was one of the greatest days of my life." Some couples found that making the transition to parenthood was more challenging than they expected and expressed the need for more anticipatory guidance and education. These findings will be compared to the perspectives of childbearing families in Europe, the Middle East, Scandinavia, the Peoples Republic of China, and the United Kingdom. Conclusions and Recommendations: Identifying and comparing the needs of childbearing families around the globe is essential in order to promote positive outcomes in childbearing families and enhance the delivery of family centered care.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleBecoming Mothers and Fathersen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157929-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Becoming Mothers and Fathers</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Callister, Lynn Clark, RN, PhD, FAAN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Brigham Young University, College of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">136 SWKT, Brigham Young University, Provo, UT, 84602, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">801-422-3227</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">lynn_callister@byu.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Lindsay Hickock, RN, BSN; Tawny Thomas, Student Nurse; Katri Vehvilainen-Julkunen, CNM, PhD, Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: The purpose of this descriptive study was to describe the perceptions of American childbearing couples about their birth experience, the provision of health care, and making the transition to parenthood. The study is part of a global comparative study. Background: There is currently literature documenting maternal perceptions of childbirth, and a growing body of knowledge of paternal perspectives. However, no international comparative studies of maternal/paternal perspectives on becoming parents were found in the literature or study of childbearing couples' perceptions of the provision of health care. It has been recommended that cross cultural comparisons of childbearing couples should be made, and the need identified for further inquiry. Method: A convenience sample of 94 couples 18-45 years of age who had given birth to their first child during the past twelve months completed maternal and paternal surveys developed by a Finnish nurse researcher who is the principal investigator. In addition, couples answered open-ended questions. Data were analyzed as appropriate for qualitative inquiry. Qualitative findings will be reported in this presentation. Findings: Themes emerging from the data include: (a) giving birth as a transcendent life event; (b) feeling positive about birth when health care providers demonstrated respect and provided individualized supportive care; (c) facilitating paternal involvement; and (d) needing more parental education across the childbearing year. One mother said, &quot;Care providers need to assure women they can do anything and that their bodies were made to give birth. Laboring women need lots of support. If a woman is able to birth in the way she wants, she feels empowered and strong.&quot; One father said, &quot;Being at my son's birth was one of the greatest days of my life.&quot; Some couples found that making the transition to parenthood was more challenging than they expected and expressed the need for more anticipatory guidance and education. These findings will be compared to the perspectives of childbearing families in Europe, the Middle East, Scandinavia, the Peoples Republic of China, and the United Kingdom. Conclusions and Recommendations: Identifying and comparing the needs of childbearing families around the globe is essential in order to promote positive outcomes in childbearing families and enhance the delivery of family centered care.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:20:29Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:20:29Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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