2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157930
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Women's Empowerment: The Bani Hamida Weaving Project
Abstract:
Women's Empowerment: The Bani Hamida Weaving Project
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2009
Author:Callister, Lynn Clark, RN, PhD, FAAN
P.I. Institution Name:Brigham Young University, College of Nursing
Title:Professor
Contact Address:136 SWKT, Brigham Young University, Provo, UT, 84602, USA
Contact Telephone:801-422-3227
Co-Authors:Dalal Bashir Moh'd, MSc, Doctoral Student; A. Elaine Bond, CCRN, DNSc, Director Doctoral Program
Purpose: The purpose of this presentation is to describe the Bani Hamida Women's Weaving Project in Jordan and its role in empowering women. This program is an exemplary initiative which demonstrates ways in which United Nations Millennium Development Goals #1 and #3 can be met. Background: Women's empowerment has emerged as a pressing global issue. The eradication of poverty, promoting gender equality, enhancing the education of women, and the improvement of the health and well being of women and their families are highlighted as important outcomes of Millennium Development Goals #1 (the alleviation of poverty and malnutrition), #2 (the promotion of education), and #3 (the reduction of gender inequities). Micro-credit programs can assist women to generate resources for sustainable income and serve as powerful strategic models to empower women. Description of the Project: The Bani Hamida Women's Weaving Project was established in 1985 and is now part of Her Majesty Queen Rania's Jordan River Foundation. Bani Hamida is a quasi-settled Bedouin tribe located along the Dead Sea in the Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan's desolate and arid mountains. Makawir, the largest village, is 30 kilometers (18 miles) away from its nearest neighbor and is extremely rural. The weaving project has provided income of over $1.5 million for the women of the tribe and has been financially stable since the late 1980s. Women run all local production operations and have gained skills in accounting, production, leadership, and other business skills. One positive outcome is that many of the women have learned to read and are now promoting education for their children. The field officer director of the foundation has noted that ?We are liberating women. We are enabling women to solve their problems.? Conclusion: Innovative programs such as the Bani Hamida Women's Weaving Project which are developed within socio-cultural context of women's lives have many demonstrated benefits and long term positive outcomes. Micro-credit initiatives foster the empowerment of women, serving to enhance the health and well being of women and their families.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleWomen's Empowerment: The Bani Hamida Weaving Projecten_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157930-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Women's Empowerment: The Bani Hamida Weaving Project</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Callister, Lynn Clark, RN, PhD, FAAN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Brigham Young University, College of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">136 SWKT, Brigham Young University, Provo, UT, 84602, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">801-422-3227</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">lynn_callister@byu.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Dalal Bashir Moh'd, MSc, Doctoral Student; A. Elaine Bond, CCRN, DNSc, Director Doctoral Program</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: The purpose of this presentation is to describe the Bani Hamida Women's Weaving Project in Jordan and its role in empowering women. This program is an exemplary initiative which demonstrates ways in which United Nations Millennium Development Goals #1 and #3 can be met. Background: Women's empowerment has emerged as a pressing global issue. The eradication of poverty, promoting gender equality, enhancing the education of women, and the improvement of the health and well being of women and their families are highlighted as important outcomes of Millennium Development Goals #1 (the alleviation of poverty and malnutrition), #2 (the promotion of education), and #3 (the reduction of gender inequities). Micro-credit programs can assist women to generate resources for sustainable income and serve as powerful strategic models to empower women.&nbsp;Description of the Project: The Bani Hamida Women's Weaving Project was established in 1985 and is now part of Her Majesty Queen Rania's Jordan River Foundation. Bani Hamida is a quasi-settled Bedouin tribe located along the Dead Sea in the Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan's desolate and arid mountains. Makawir, the largest village, is 30 kilometers (18 miles) away from its nearest neighbor and is extremely rural. The weaving project has provided income of over $1.5 million for the women of the tribe and has been financially stable since the late 1980s. Women run all local production operations and have gained skills in accounting, production, leadership, and other business skills. One positive outcome is that many of the women have learned to read and are now promoting education for their children. The field officer director of the foundation has noted that ?We are liberating women. We are enabling women to solve their problems.? Conclusion: Innovative programs such as the Bani Hamida Women's Weaving Project which are developed within socio-cultural context of women's lives have many demonstrated benefits and long term positive outcomes. Micro-credit initiatives foster the empowerment of women, serving to enhance the health and well being of women and their families.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:20:32Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:20:32Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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