2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157931
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Comparing Expectations of Laboring Women and Care by Registered Nurses
Abstract:
Comparing Expectations of Laboring Women and Care by Registered Nurses
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2009
Author:Callister, Lynn C., RN, PhD, FAAN
P.I. Institution Name:Brigham Young University, College of Nursing
Title:Professor
Contact Address:136 SWKT, Provo, UT, 84602, USA
Contact Telephone:801-422-3227
Co-Authors:Troy Carlton, RN, PhDc, Instructor; Glenda J. Christiaens, PhD, RN, AHN-BC, Associate Teaching Professor; Dena Walker, RN, MS, CNM, Assistant Clinical Professor
Purpose/Aim: Matching patient expectations of care with actual care received is a major challenge for nursing and other health care clinicians. This major challenge can be observed in many hospitals, especially in Labor and Delivery units. Differences between informed laboring women and registered nurses can cause mismatched expectations and perceptions which can lead to dissatisfaction. Because women are the major power brokers when decisions are made related to future health care needs of their family, satisfaction of women is a major issue for hospitals and health care clinicians. Research has been completed on the perceptions of women during the birth experience and perceptions of nurses providing supportive care to laboring women, but there is a lack of research comparing and contrasting the difference and similarities between these two groups. The purpose of this qualitative descriptive study was to identify, compare, and understand differences in perceptions and expectations between laboring women and registered nurses who provide labor care. Background Information: Birth is a powerful, complex, and life changing event that leaves a lasting impact on childbearing women. This impact can be positive or negative depending on the women's perception of the birth experience. Today's childbearing women are more informed about options related to care and support during the labor process. Studies have reported a positive birth experience when women felt in control, when effective communication was used by clinicians, when power was shared related to decision making, and when women felt supported, valued and treated with respect by nurses and other clinicians. Conversely, women with a negative birth experience felt a lack of support and control, reporting lower satisfaction rates. Research has demonstrated the strongest predictor of patient satisfaction is the quality of care provided by nurses. Carlton, Callister, and Stoneman (2005) determined that adding to the complexity and difficulty of the laboring process is support or lack of support by nursing staff. Nurses bring to the laboring process knowledge, skill, past clinical experience, their own bias, and the nurses' own personal birth experience. Because of the expertise and experience nurse, numerous studies have indicated that decision making control is sometimes shifted from patient to clinician. Methods: A purposive, convenience sample of two distinct groups - twenty (20) women who recently had a birth experience in three birthing units in the western United States and seventeen (17) Labor and Delivery nurses from five (5) hospitals were interviewed. Interviews were audio-taped and transcriptions analyzed for common themes. Results: Indications of a successful and positive birth experience were identified along with key differences in providing labor support were identified between childbearing women and nurses. Unrealistic birth expectations by patients and unrecognized actions by nurses create a gap between expectations and actual care received. Environmental challenges along with other barriers to providing supportive care were identified by nursing staff. Issues of control, predictability, confidence, efficiency, and calculability were identified in both childbearing women and nurses. Implications: Nurse must provide a higher level of support and patient must be better prepared if birth is to be perceived as a positive experience. Barriers, biases, and differences must be addressed to maximize support during birth. In addition, issues of control, predictability confidence, efficiency, and calculability must be further explored to understand issues of satisfaction and provide a positive birth experience.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleComparing Expectations of Laboring Women and Care by Registered Nursesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157931-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Comparing Expectations of Laboring Women and Care by Registered Nurses</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Callister, Lynn C., RN, PhD, FAAN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Brigham Young University, College of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">136 SWKT, Provo, UT, 84602, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">801-422-3227</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">lynn_callister@byu.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Troy Carlton, RN, PhDc, Instructor; Glenda J. Christiaens, PhD, RN, AHN-BC, Associate Teaching Professor; Dena Walker, RN, MS, CNM, Assistant Clinical Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose/Aim: Matching patient expectations of care with actual care received is a major challenge for nursing and other health care clinicians. This major challenge can be observed in many hospitals, especially in Labor and Delivery units. Differences between informed laboring women and registered nurses can cause mismatched expectations and perceptions which can lead to dissatisfaction. Because women are the major power brokers when decisions are made related to future health care needs of their family, satisfaction of women is a major issue for hospitals and health care clinicians. Research has been completed on the perceptions of women during the birth experience and perceptions of nurses providing supportive care to laboring women, but there is a lack of research comparing and contrasting the difference and similarities between these two groups. The purpose of this qualitative descriptive study was to identify, compare, and understand differences in perceptions and expectations between laboring women and registered nurses who provide labor care. Background Information: Birth is a powerful, complex, and life changing event that leaves a lasting impact on childbearing women. This impact can be positive or negative depending on the women's perception of the birth experience. Today's childbearing women are more informed about options related to care and support during the labor process. Studies have reported a positive birth experience when women felt in control, when effective communication was used by clinicians, when power was shared related to decision making, and when women felt supported, valued and treated with respect by nurses and other clinicians. Conversely, women with a negative birth experience felt a lack of support and control, reporting lower satisfaction rates. Research has demonstrated the strongest predictor of patient satisfaction is the quality of care provided by nurses. Carlton, Callister, and Stoneman (2005) determined that adding to the complexity and difficulty of the laboring process is support or lack of support by nursing staff. Nurses bring to the laboring process knowledge, skill, past clinical experience, their own bias, and the nurses' own personal birth experience. Because of the expertise and experience nurse, numerous studies have indicated that decision making control is sometimes shifted from patient to clinician. Methods: A purposive, convenience sample of two distinct groups - twenty (20) women who recently had a birth experience in three birthing units in the western United States and seventeen (17) Labor and Delivery nurses from five (5) hospitals were interviewed. Interviews were audio-taped and transcriptions analyzed for common themes. Results: Indications of a successful and positive birth experience were identified along with key differences in providing labor support were identified between childbearing women and nurses. Unrealistic birth expectations by patients and unrecognized actions by nurses create a gap between expectations and actual care received. Environmental challenges along with other barriers to providing supportive care were identified by nursing staff. Issues of control, predictability, confidence, efficiency, and calculability were identified in both childbearing women and nurses. Implications: Nurse must provide a higher level of support and patient must be better prepared if birth is to be perceived as a positive experience. Barriers, biases, and differences must be addressed to maximize support during birth. In addition, issues of control, predictability confidence, efficiency, and calculability must be further explored to understand issues of satisfaction and provide a positive birth experience.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:20:36Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:20:36Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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