2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157932
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Evidence of Maternal Health Disparities in Survey Findings
Abstract:
Evidence of Maternal Health Disparities in Survey Findings
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2009
Author:Camillo, Patricia a., PHD, RNC, WHNP/GNP, BC
P.I. Institution Name:Minnesota State University, School of Nursing
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:360 WISSINK HALL, Mankato, MN, 56001, USA
Contact Telephone:917-756-5386
Co-Authors:Barbara Frohnert, MPH, Epidemiologist, Prams Coordinator
Background: Every year in the United States one thousand women die from pregnancy related complications, a rank of forty-one among developed countries. African American women are four times more likely to die than their Caucasian counterparts. Racial disparities in the United States present a particular challenge due to the complexity of interacting social forces. The purpose of this project was to look for evidence of health disparities among Black and White women as evidenced in data from The Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System (PRAMS). PRAMS is a surveillance project of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and state health departments that collects state-specific, population-based data on maternal attitudes and experiences before, during and shortly after pregnancy. Description: This poster presents data collected in Minnesota, a state with relatively little diversity, which demonstrates statistically significant disparities between Black and White women who were residents in the state and experienced a pregnancy between 2004-2006. These data were analyzed in preparing a proposal to address obstetric morbidity among African American women. Outcomes: Although there are several questions on the survey that address and demonstrate significant and not surprising structural barriers to health care, there are others that are more personal and less likely to be addressed in the current system of care. They were grouped into four major categories of stressors that included traumatic, financial, emotional and partner related. In every category, except emotional, Black women indicated significantly more stressors than White women. Additional questions in the survey were analyzed which addressed evidence for social support. Among Black women respondents every option, including husband/partner, mother/father/in-laws, friends, other family members, someone else, all resulted in statistically significant lower levels of support than White women. Conclusions: In synthesizing these data, the possibility emerged that the stressors were so significant for this population that they likely represent at least one reason why disparities in maternal outcomes continue to exist. This is especially interesting when noting that the leading cause of maternal death in Minnesota is largely cardiac related. Although the numbers of women dying each year in Minnesota from pregnancy related causes are relatively small, the disparity between Blacks and Whites persist. The loss of even one woman is a devastating event with long standing implications for not only her immediate family but also her community. This poster presentation will focus on evidence for these disparities evident in the Minnesota PRAMS survey. These findings can illuminate nursing practice in women's health as well as support continuing research into the causes for these disparities.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEvidence of Maternal Health Disparities in Survey Findingsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157932-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Evidence of Maternal Health Disparities in Survey Findings</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Camillo, Patricia a., PHD, RNC, WHNP/GNP, BC</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Minnesota State University, School of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">360 WISSINK HALL, Mankato, MN, 56001, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">917-756-5386</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">PAT.CAMILLO@GMAIL.COM, PATRICIA.CAMILLO@MNSU.EDU</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Barbara Frohnert, MPH, Epidemiologist, Prams Coordinator</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Background: Every year in the United States one thousand women die from pregnancy related complications, a rank of forty-one among developed countries. African American women are four times more likely to die than their Caucasian counterparts. Racial disparities in the United States present a particular challenge due to the complexity of interacting social forces. The purpose of this project was to look for evidence of health disparities among Black and White women as evidenced in data from The Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System (PRAMS). PRAMS is a surveillance project of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and state health departments that collects state-specific, population-based data on maternal attitudes and experiences before, during and shortly after pregnancy. Description: This poster presents data collected in Minnesota, a state with relatively little diversity, which demonstrates statistically significant disparities between Black and White women who were residents in the state and experienced a pregnancy between 2004-2006. These data were analyzed in preparing a proposal to address obstetric morbidity among African American women. Outcomes: Although there are several questions on the survey that address and demonstrate significant and not surprising structural barriers to health care, there are others that are more personal and less likely to be addressed in the current system of care. They were grouped into four major categories of stressors that included traumatic, financial, emotional and partner related. In every category, except emotional, Black women indicated significantly more stressors than White women. Additional questions in the survey were analyzed which addressed evidence for social support. Among Black women respondents every option, including husband/partner, mother/father/in-laws, friends, other family members, someone else, all resulted in statistically significant lower levels of support than White women. Conclusions: In synthesizing these data, the possibility emerged that the stressors were so significant for this population that they likely represent at least one reason why disparities in maternal outcomes continue to exist. This is especially interesting when noting that the leading cause of maternal death in Minnesota is largely cardiac related. Although the numbers of women dying each year in Minnesota from pregnancy related causes are relatively small, the disparity between Blacks and Whites persist. The loss of even one woman is a devastating event with long standing implications for not only her immediate family but also her community. This poster presentation will focus on evidence for these disparities evident in the Minnesota PRAMS survey. These findings can illuminate nursing practice in women's health as well as support continuing research into the causes for these disparities.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:20:39Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:20:39Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.