2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157933
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Motivaters and Barriers to Returning to School for Advanced Nursing Degrees
Abstract:
Motivaters and Barriers to Returning to School for Advanced Nursing Degrees
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2009
Author:Candela, Lori L., EdD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Nevada, Las Vegas, Psychosocial Nursing
Title:Associate Professor and Chair: Psychosocial Nursing
Contact Address:4505 S. Maryland Parkway, Las Vegas, NV, 89154-3018, USA
Contact Telephone:702-895-2443
Co-Authors:Cheryl Bowles, Professor
Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine factors that promote or prevent registered nurses from returning to school to obtain advanced degrees. Background: There is no question that more nurses are needed to meet the diverse health care needs of Americans. In fact, nursing will continue to be the highest demand occupation through at least 2012. But the area in which the greatest nursing shortage exists is at the master?s and doctoral level. Advance practice nurses increasingly fill gaps in primary and acute care and provide leadership at unit and organizational levels. Doctorally prepared nurse scientists are essential in producing and disseminating new knowledge and theories to improve health and advance the profession. Yet a 2004 nationwide nursing survey conducted by the Health Resources and Services Administration revealed that a meager 13% of the profession held degrees at the masters or doctoral level. In the state of Nevada, the picture is much worse. In 2005, a survey of licensed registered nurses in Nevada revealed that only 8.3% held masters degrees and a mere 0.8% held doctoral degrees. Methods: A descriptive survey design was employed. A survey composed of 14 demographic and 17 Likert-type questions was developed by the researchers for online access. A survey invitation postcard was mailed to 2,500 randomly selected Nevada registered nurses. A reminder postcard was sent three weeks later. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and content analysis for written participant comments to determine themes. Results: One hundred and thirty four completed responses were obtained. Thirty percent of respondents had 5 to 15 years of work experience and 54% had over 15 years. Eighty two percent were currently working as RN?s and 85% were working full time and not attending school for advanced degrees.  Respondents reported personal enrichment, salary and job promotion as the most common motivators, while family obligations and work schedules were the most common barriers to returning to school.  Seventy four respondents also provided written comments regarding motivators and barriers to returning to school. Themes included the need to have an in-state DNP, more program flexibility to accommodate home and work schedules, the need for a fast track RN to MSN program and considering BS to MSN and PhD options. Conclusions: The small n of this sample precludes the ability to generalize any findings. Yet it is clear that nurses desire a return to nursing school to obtain an advanced degree. However, family obligations and work schedules appear to be major barriers. The need for an in-state DNP program within the state university system is important. A working committee composed of nursing faculty from 2 Nevada Schools of Nursing has been established to develop this education program for Nevada nurses.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMotivaters and Barriers to Returning to School for Advanced Nursing Degreesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157933-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Motivaters and Barriers to Returning to School for Advanced Nursing Degrees</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Candela, Lori L., EdD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Nevada, Las Vegas, Psychosocial Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor and Chair: Psychosocial Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">4505 S. Maryland Parkway, Las Vegas, NV, 89154-3018, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">702-895-2443</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">lori.candela@unlv.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Cheryl Bowles, Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine factors that promote or prevent registered nurses from returning to school to obtain advanced degrees. Background: There is no question that more nurses are needed to meet the diverse health care needs of Americans. In fact, nursing will continue to be the highest demand occupation through at least 2012. But the area in which the greatest nursing shortage exists is at the master?s and doctoral level. Advance practice nurses increasingly fill gaps in primary and acute care and provide leadership at unit and organizational levels. Doctorally prepared nurse scientists are essential in producing and disseminating new knowledge and theories to improve health and advance the profession. Yet a 2004 nationwide nursing survey conducted by the Health Resources and Services Administration revealed that a meager 13% of the profession held degrees at the masters or doctoral level. In the state of Nevada, the picture is much worse. In 2005, a survey of licensed registered nurses in Nevada revealed that only 8.3% held masters degrees and a mere 0.8% held doctoral degrees. Methods: A descriptive survey design was employed. A survey composed of 14 demographic and 17 Likert-type questions was developed by the researchers for online access. A survey invitation postcard was mailed to 2,500 randomly selected Nevada registered nurses. A reminder postcard was sent three weeks later. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and content analysis for written participant comments to determine themes. Results: One hundred and thirty four completed responses were obtained. Thirty percent of respondents had 5 to 15 years of work experience and 54% had over 15 years. Eighty two percent were currently working as RN?s and 85% were working full time and not attending school for advanced degrees.&nbsp; Respondents reported personal enrichment, salary and job promotion as the most common motivators, while family obligations and work schedules were the most common barriers to returning to school.&nbsp; Seventy four respondents also provided written comments regarding motivators and barriers to returning to school. Themes included the need to have an in-state DNP, more program flexibility to accommodate home and work schedules, the need for a fast track RN to MSN program and considering BS to MSN and PhD options. Conclusions: The small n of this sample precludes the ability to generalize any findings. Yet it is clear that nurses desire a return to nursing school to obtain an advanced degree. However, family obligations and work schedules appear to be major barriers. The need for an in-state DNP program within the state university system is important. A working committee composed of nursing faculty from 2 Nevada Schools of Nursing has been established to develop this education program for Nevada nurses.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:20:42Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:20:42Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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