Study Recruitment of Elders in the Hospital Setting: Possibilities and Pitfalls

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157936
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Study Recruitment of Elders in the Hospital Setting: Possibilities and Pitfalls
Abstract:
Study Recruitment of Elders in the Hospital Setting: Possibilities and Pitfalls
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2009
Author:Casey, Colleen M., MS, RN, CNS, CCRN
P.I. Institution Name:Oregon Health & Sciences University, School of Nursing
Title:PhD Candidate
Contact Address:4921 NE 30th Avenue, Portland, OR, 97211, USA
Contact Telephone:503-281-8974
Data collection and recruitment in the hospital environment presents both opportunities and challenges. Researchers must balance issues affecting the integrity of the study with the realities and complexities inherent in any acute care system. This presentation discusses the methodological issues that arose during the author's study, particularly related to recruiting research subjects. This instrument feasibility study examined whether two types of accelerometers were sensitive enough to detect typical clinical care activities (such as turning in bed) in an inpatient setting. Subjects 65 years and older were recruited through a peri-anesthesia, pre-admission testing clinic prior to hospitalization. The initiation of an electronic medical record system at the beginning of recruitment and data collection created both delays in recruitment as well as new screening opportunities. Additionally, initial recruitment protocols had to be modified based on shifting job responsibilities, competing clinical demands, and limited experience with the new electronic system. The study employed various recruitment strategies, including passive strategies such as brochures and tear flyers, as well as active efforts, such as the use of nurse coordinators within specific surgical clinics. Issues related to recruitment by surgical clinic staff included the inability to systematically identify eligible patients, willingness to participate in nursing research, identification of suitable clinic recruiter, and time constraints of the clinical environment. Inconsistent protocols among various surgical services presented another challenge to subject recruitment. Variations included the utilization of the pre-admission clinic, service patterns, and duration of clinic appointments. Ultimately, the selection and training of specific, paid advanced practice nurse clinicians within the pre-admission environment resulted in successful recruitment of the sample. Subject factors that affected recruitment efforts included patient age, the severity of illness requiring a surgical procedure, co-morbidities, travel distance, and scheduling constraints related to multiple appointments on a single day. Successful recruitment strategies involved screening potential subjects far in advance of their scheduled appointments, advance contact by the recruiter, and follow-up and enrollment by telephone prior to their appointments. Essential to the success of study recruitment and data collection efforts were the clinical contacts of the primary investigator, with flexibility, patience, and creativity exercised when necessary. A positive clinic culture in support of nursing research developed around the project, promoted by the non-research clinic staff who participated in the study and learned more about various aspects of the research process.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleStudy Recruitment of Elders in the Hospital Setting: Possibilities and Pitfallsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157936-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Study Recruitment of Elders in the Hospital Setting: Possibilities and Pitfalls</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Casey, Colleen M., MS, RN, CNS, CCRN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Oregon Health &amp; Sciences University, School of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">PhD Candidate</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">4921 NE 30th Avenue, Portland, OR, 97211, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">503-281-8974</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">caseyc@ohsu.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Data collection and recruitment in the hospital environment presents both opportunities and challenges. Researchers must balance issues affecting the integrity of the study with the realities and complexities inherent in any acute care system. This presentation discusses the methodological issues that arose during the author's study, particularly related to recruiting research subjects. This instrument feasibility study examined whether two types of accelerometers were sensitive enough to detect typical clinical care activities (such as turning in bed) in an inpatient setting. Subjects 65 years and older were recruited through a peri-anesthesia, pre-admission testing clinic prior to hospitalization. The initiation of an electronic medical record system at the beginning of recruitment and data collection created both delays in recruitment as well as new screening opportunities. Additionally, initial recruitment protocols had to be modified based on shifting job responsibilities, competing clinical demands, and limited experience with the new electronic system. The study employed various recruitment strategies, including passive strategies such as brochures and tear flyers, as well as active efforts, such as the use of nurse coordinators within specific surgical clinics. Issues related to recruitment by surgical clinic staff included the inability to systematically identify eligible patients, willingness to participate in nursing research, identification of suitable clinic recruiter, and time constraints of the clinical environment. Inconsistent protocols among various surgical services presented another challenge to subject recruitment. Variations included the utilization of the pre-admission clinic, service patterns, and duration of clinic appointments. Ultimately, the selection and training of specific, paid advanced practice nurse clinicians within the pre-admission environment resulted in successful recruitment of the sample. Subject factors that affected recruitment efforts included patient age, the severity of illness requiring a surgical procedure, co-morbidities, travel distance, and scheduling constraints related to multiple appointments on a single day. Successful recruitment strategies involved screening potential subjects far in advance of their scheduled appointments, advance contact by the recruiter, and follow-up and enrollment by telephone prior to their appointments. Essential to the success of study recruitment and data collection efforts were the clinical contacts of the primary investigator, with flexibility, patience, and creativity exercised when necessary. A positive clinic culture in support of nursing research developed around the project, promoted by the non-research clinic staff who participated in the study and learned more about various aspects of the research process.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:20:53Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:20:53Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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