Health Professions Disparity in Nursing: Underrepresentation of Minority Students

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157937
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Health Professions Disparity in Nursing: Underrepresentation of Minority Students
Abstract:
Health Professions Disparity in Nursing: Underrepresentation of Minority Students
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2009
Author:Catolico, Olivia, Ph.D., RN, BC
P.I. Institution Name:Dominican University of California, Department of Nursing
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:50 Acacia Avenue, San Rafael, CA, 94901, USA
Contact Telephone:415-257-0156
Co-Authors:Luanne Linnard-Palmer, EdD, RN, CPON, Chair and Professor
Purpose: This presentation highlights strategies to recruit and retain underrepresented minorities to the nursing profession at a 4-year private university. Project goals relevant to this presentation were to: (a) increase admissions efforts to recruit minority nursing students, and (b) implement efforts to encourage graduating students to seek out professional employment in underserved areas. Background: Less than 9% of the 2.2 million nurses employed in nursing are African American, Hispanic American, and American Indian (Sullivan Commission, 2004). Persistent socio-cultural, economic, and institutional barriers steer underrepresented minority group members away from nursing (Sullivan Commission, 2004). In California, the overall Hispanic population is 34.8%, yet only 5.6% of the RN workforce is Hispanic. Similarly, the overall African American population comprises 6% in California and the RN African American workforce is less than 4.0% (Center for Health Professions, 2008). In attempts to address the health professions disparity gap in nursing, the nursing student body at Dominican University of California reflects successful recruitment of students of color. In Fall 2006, 56% of the undergraduate nursing majors, and 37% of the graduate nursing students were students from African American, Hispanic, Asian, and Native American groups (Institutional Research, 2006). Forty five (45%) of BSN degrees were awarded to students from underrepresented minority groups (Institutional Research, 2006). Nonetheless, issues related to admissions, attrition, and academic progression of underrepresented minority students require closer attention and scrutiny. Method: A focus group consisting of graduate and undergraduate faculty, admissions staff, and undergraduate students of underrepresented minority groups, and a nursing executive of a large county hospital met together to participate in group dialogue. All participants gave permission to be tape-recorded. Participants were informed that personal identities will remain anonymous, and shared information would be used to guide the principal investigators in identifying future actions to address the project goals. The group was led by one of the faculty who set an informal tone at the beginning of the meeting. This allowed students to speak freely, and encouraged inquiry and comment from non-students. A semi-structured interview guide with open ended questions was used to facilitate dialogue.  Students were invited to address the following major issues: (a) the single most decisive factor that brought them to the university, (b) the single most difficult hurdle they faced, (c) whether or not they felt supported, (d) whether or not they were getting help and assistance from the nursing faculty to be successful in the program, (e) intent to work in underserved communities after graduation, and (f) intent to pursue advanced education. Outcomes: Students identified rapid and timely responses from admissions in their decision to attend this university. Financial aid concerns were a commonality to these students. Nonetheless, they perceived the attainment of their educational goal as the single positive motivational factor to continue in the program. All of the students indicated they felt supported academically and identified traits, characteristics, and actions of specific faculty who were especially supportive of them. Students also shared common experiences and interactions with faculty who promulgated discrimination, stereotypes, and prejudices about certain ethnic minority groups. The students in this focus group expressed intent to "give back" to their communities. Conclusions: The findings of this project have implications for ongoing faculty development and integrated curriculum development in the area of diversity and cultural sensitivity. These findings also have implications for supporting students of underrepresented minority groups, both academically as well as holistically. This project was funded by a 2-year grant from the California Office of Statewide Health Planning and Development.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleHealth Professions Disparity in Nursing: Underrepresentation of Minority Studentsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157937-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Health Professions Disparity in Nursing: Underrepresentation of Minority Students</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Catolico, Olivia, Ph.D., RN, BC</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Dominican University of California, Department of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">50 Acacia Avenue, San Rafael, CA, 94901, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">415-257-0156</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">olivia.catolico@dominican.edu, ocatolic@aol.com</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Luanne Linnard-Palmer, EdD, RN, CPON, Chair and Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: This presentation highlights strategies to recruit and retain underrepresented minorities to the nursing profession at a 4-year private university. Project goals relevant to this presentation were to: (a) increase admissions efforts to recruit minority nursing students, and (b) implement efforts to encourage graduating students to seek out professional employment in underserved areas. Background: Less than 9% of the 2.2 million nurses employed in nursing are African American, Hispanic American, and American Indian (Sullivan Commission, 2004). Persistent socio-cultural, economic, and institutional barriers steer underrepresented minority group members away from nursing (Sullivan Commission, 2004). In California, the overall Hispanic population is 34.8%, yet only 5.6% of the RN workforce is Hispanic. Similarly, the overall African American population comprises 6% in California and the RN African American workforce is less than 4.0% (Center for Health Professions, 2008). In attempts to address the health professions disparity gap in nursing, the nursing student body at Dominican University of California reflects successful recruitment of students of color. In Fall 2006, 56% of the undergraduate nursing majors, and 37% of the graduate nursing students were students from African American, Hispanic, Asian, and Native American groups (Institutional Research, 2006). Forty five (45%) of BSN degrees were awarded to students from underrepresented minority groups (Institutional Research, 2006). Nonetheless, issues related to admissions, attrition, and academic progression of underrepresented minority students require closer attention and scrutiny. Method: A focus group consisting of graduate and undergraduate faculty, admissions staff, and undergraduate students of underrepresented minority groups, and a nursing executive of a large county hospital met together to participate in group dialogue. All participants gave permission to be tape-recorded. Participants were informed that personal identities will remain anonymous, and shared information would be used to guide the principal investigators in identifying future actions to address the project goals. The group was led by one of the faculty who set an informal tone at the beginning of the meeting. This allowed students to speak freely, and encouraged inquiry and comment from non-students. A semi-structured interview guide with open ended questions was used to facilitate dialogue.  Students were invited to address the following major issues: (a) the single most decisive factor that brought them to the university, (b) the single most difficult hurdle they faced, (c) whether or not they felt supported, (d) whether or not they were getting help and assistance from the nursing faculty to be successful in the program, (e) intent to work in underserved communities after graduation, and (f) intent to pursue advanced education. Outcomes: Students identified rapid and timely responses from admissions in their decision to attend this university. Financial aid concerns were a commonality to these students. Nonetheless, they perceived the attainment of their educational goal as the single positive motivational factor to continue in the program. All of the students indicated they felt supported academically and identified traits, characteristics, and actions of specific faculty who were especially supportive of them. Students also shared common experiences and interactions with faculty who promulgated discrimination, stereotypes, and prejudices about certain ethnic minority groups. The students in this focus group expressed intent to "give back" to their communities. Conclusions: The findings of this project have implications for ongoing faculty development and integrated curriculum development in the area of diversity and cultural sensitivity. These findings also have implications for supporting students of underrepresented minority groups, both academically as well as holistically. This project was funded by a 2-year grant from the California Office of Statewide Health Planning and Development.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:20:56Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:20:56Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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