2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157938
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Health Promotion Behavior of Korean Sojourner Mothers
Abstract:
Health Promotion Behavior of Korean Sojourner Mothers
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2009
Author:Cha, Chiyoung, RN, MS
P.I. Institution Name:University of Washington, School of Nursing
Title:Pre-doctoral student
Contact Address:6278 NE Radford Drive, #3114, Seattle, WA, 98115, USA
Contact Telephone:206-369-6002
Purpose: The purpose of this study is to develop a theory on health promotion behavior of Korean sojourner mothers to understand how they promote health. Background: In the early 1990s, some families started to live apart for the education of their children, with mothers living in the United States with their children, and fathers living in Korea as breadwinners of the families. The numbers of families who left Korea are inferred as 29,511 in 2006 which is thirteen times more than those in 1995 (KEDI, 2007). The increase of this new form of family showed a steep slope, thus drawing public attention in Korea. Yet, concerns addressed were focused on the burden of the fathers left, maladjustment of the children, and the outflow of foreign currency. Very little has been done to look at the health of the mothers in this unique form of family. Methods: Mixed methodologies will be used: (1) surveys to describe the health promoting lifestyle of Korean sojourner mothers, and (2) a grounded theory methodology to generate a theory on their health promotion behavior. Flyers and snowballing techniques will be used for recruitment. Twenty participants or more will be asked for in-person interviews after completing the survey (theoretical sampling) until the saturation is reached. Questions such as: "How do you describe your way of promoting health?" or "What efforts do you make to promote your health?" will be asked. Constant comparative analysis will be adopted to analyze the actions and shared meanings of Korean sojourner mothers. Result: Based on symbolic interactionism, a theory of health promotion behavior will be developed through the direct examination of participants' empirical social world. The mothers might have unique strategies to promote their health while they go through hug transitions to adjust themselves in a foreign country with little social support. Their status as temporary residents, changed responsibilities as heads of the separated families, and language difficulty might have influence on their health promotion behavior. Implications: Although the health of sojourner population is compromised during their stay in foreign countries, there has not been much attention from the nurse researchers. This study will bridge a gap between what is known and not known about sojourner health. In a broader point of view, with the number of internationally/intranationally separated families growing rapidly every year, the result of the study can suggest some answers to the increasing need to understand how the members of separated families promote their health.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleHealth Promotion Behavior of Korean Sojourner Mothersen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157938-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Health Promotion Behavior of Korean Sojourner Mothers</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Cha, Chiyoung, RN, MS</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Washington, School of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Pre-doctoral student</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">6278 NE Radford Drive, #3114, Seattle, WA, 98115, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">206-369-6002</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">chiyoung@u.washington.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: The purpose of this study is to develop a theory on health promotion behavior of Korean sojourner mothers to understand how they promote health. Background: In the early 1990s, some families started to live apart for the education of their children, with mothers living in the United States with their children, and fathers living in Korea as breadwinners of the families. The numbers of families who left Korea are inferred as 29,511 in 2006 which is thirteen times more than those in 1995 (KEDI, 2007). The increase of this new form of family showed a steep slope, thus drawing public attention in Korea. Yet, concerns addressed were focused on the burden of the fathers left, maladjustment of the children, and the outflow of foreign currency. Very little has been done to look at the health of the mothers in this unique form of family. Methods: Mixed methodologies will be used: (1) surveys to describe the health promoting lifestyle of Korean sojourner mothers, and (2) a grounded theory methodology to generate a theory on their health promotion behavior. Flyers and snowballing techniques will be used for recruitment. Twenty participants or more will be asked for in-person interviews after completing the survey (theoretical sampling) until the saturation is reached. Questions such as: &quot;How do you describe your way of promoting health?&quot; or &quot;What efforts do you make to promote your health?&quot; will be asked. Constant comparative analysis will be adopted to analyze the actions and shared meanings of Korean sojourner mothers. Result: Based on symbolic interactionism, a theory of health promotion behavior will be developed through the direct examination of participants' empirical social world. The mothers might have unique strategies to promote their health while they go through hug transitions to adjust themselves in a foreign country with little social support. Their status as temporary residents, changed responsibilities as heads of the separated families, and language difficulty might have influence on their health promotion behavior. Implications: Although the health of sojourner population is compromised during their stay in foreign countries, there has not been much attention from the nurse researchers. This study will bridge a gap between what is known and not known about sojourner health. In a broader point of view, with the number of internationally/intranationally separated families growing rapidly every year, the result of the study can suggest some answers to the increasing need to understand how the members of separated families promote their health.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:21:00Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:21:00Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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