2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157940
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Effect of Breast Cancer Related Lymphedema on Arm Function
Abstract:
The Effect of Breast Cancer Related Lymphedema on Arm Function
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2009
Author:Cho, Maria, RN, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of California San Francisco, Department of Physiological Nursing
Title:Assistant Adjunct Professor
Contact Address:2 Koret Way # 631, San Francisco, CA, 94143, USA
Contact Telephone:415-476-0966
Co-Authors:Nancy Byl, PT, PhD, Professor; Marylin Dodd, RN, PhD, Professor; Betty J. Smoot, PT, DPTSc, Doctoral Student; Josephine Wong, MD, Research Associate
Purposes/Aims: Our aim is to explore the impact of BCRL on UE function. Rationale/Conceptual Basis/Background: Breast-cancer-related-lymphedema (BCRL) affects approximately equal to 25% of the 2 million breast cancer survivors in the US.  Its impact on upper extremity (UE) function has been understudied.  The Symptom Management Model, which includes dimensions of symptom experience, symptom management strategies, and outcomes, was used. Methods: As part of an ongoing cross-sectional study, results from 70 women (mean age 56.3, SD 9.5) post breast cancer treatment were used in this preliminary analysis. Symptom and UE function questionnaires were completed. UE measures included fine motor coordination, Semmes-Weinstein-monofilaments (SWM), vibration perception threshold (VPT), strength, and range of motion (ROM). Data were analyzed with descriptive statistics, t-tests, and repeated measures ANOVA to evaluate differences between unaffected and affected UEs in BCRL and non-BCRL groups. Results: 39 participants reported BCRL diagnosis. Of those, 53% reported breast pain, and 35% reported UE pain on the affected side, versus 29% and 16% respectively in the non-BCRL group. We found a significant main effect of side, with both groups demonstrating significant differences between unaffected and affected sides in shoulder abduction ROM (p<0.001), shoulder flexion ROM (p<0.005), wrist flexion ROM (p=0.024), and light touch at the medial upper arm (p=0.004); Strength was also found to be statistically, though not clinically significantly different in shoulder abduction, elbow flexion, and wrist flexion. We found a significant main effect of lymphedema. Women in the BCRL group averaged less shoulder abduction ROM (p=0.018), shoulder flexion ROM (p=0.030) and shoulder abduction strength (p=0.021) on both sides, compared to the non-BCRL group. Implications:  Many BC survivors experience pain and physical impairment following cancer treatment. Assessment should include pain report, and evaluation of bilateral UE ROM, strength, and sensation in BC survivors with and without BCRL. Both groups demonstrated differences between unaffected and affected sides. Additionally, there were bilateral limitations in shoulder strength and ROM in the BCRL group compared to the non-BCRL group. Early recognition and intervention can prevent or reduce physical impairment and subsequent limitation in activity, and therefore improve QOL.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Effect of Breast Cancer Related Lymphedema on Arm Functionen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157940-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Effect of Breast Cancer Related Lymphedema on Arm Function</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Cho, Maria, RN, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of California San Francisco, Department of Physiological Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Adjunct Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">2 Koret Way # 631, San Francisco, CA, 94143, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">415-476-0966</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">maria.cho@nursing.ucsf.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Nancy Byl, PT, PhD, Professor; Marylin Dodd, RN, PhD, Professor; Betty J. Smoot, PT, DPTSc, Doctoral Student; Josephine Wong, MD, Research Associate</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purposes/Aims: Our aim is to explore the impact of BCRL on UE function. Rationale/Conceptual Basis/Background: Breast-cancer-related-lymphedema (BCRL) affects approximately equal to 25% of the 2 million breast cancer survivors in the US.&nbsp; Its impact on upper extremity (UE) function has been understudied.&nbsp; The Symptom Management Model, which includes dimensions of symptom experience, symptom management strategies, and outcomes, was used. Methods: As part of an ongoing cross-sectional study, results from 70 women (mean age 56.3, SD 9.5) post breast cancer treatment were used in this preliminary analysis. Symptom and UE function questionnaires were completed. UE measures included fine motor coordination, Semmes-Weinstein-monofilaments (SWM), vibration perception threshold (VPT), strength, and range of motion (ROM). Data were analyzed with descriptive statistics, t-tests, and repeated measures ANOVA to evaluate differences between unaffected and affected UEs in BCRL and non-BCRL groups. Results: 39 participants reported BCRL diagnosis. Of those, 53% reported breast pain, and 35% reported UE pain on the affected side, versus 29% and 16% respectively in the non-BCRL group. We found a significant main effect of side, with both groups demonstrating significant differences between unaffected and affected sides in shoulder abduction ROM (p&lt;0.001), shoulder flexion ROM (p&lt;0.005), wrist flexion ROM (p=0.024), and light touch at the medial upper arm (p=0.004); Strength was also found to be statistically, though not clinically significantly different in shoulder abduction, elbow flexion, and wrist flexion. We found a significant main effect of lymphedema. Women in the BCRL group averaged less shoulder abduction ROM (p=0.018), shoulder flexion ROM (p=0.030) and shoulder abduction strength (p=0.021) on both sides, compared to the non-BCRL group. Implications: &nbsp;Many BC survivors experience pain and physical impairment following cancer treatment. Assessment should include pain report, and evaluation of bilateral UE ROM, strength, and sensation in BC survivors with and without BCRL. Both groups demonstrated differences between unaffected and affected sides. Additionally, there were bilateral limitations in shoulder strength and ROM in the BCRL group compared to the non-BCRL group. Early recognition and intervention can prevent or reduce physical impairment and subsequent limitation in activity, and therefore improve QOL.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:21:07Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:21:07Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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