Sleep Disturbance in Patients With Head and Neck Cancer Receiving Radiation Therapy

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157941
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Sleep Disturbance in Patients With Head and Neck Cancer Receiving Radiation Therapy
Abstract:
Sleep Disturbance in Patients With Head and Neck Cancer Receiving Radiation Therapy
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2009
Author:Cho, Maria, RN, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of California San Francisco, Physiological Nursing
Title:Assistant Adjunct Professor
Contact Address:2 Koret Way, Box 0610, San Francisco, CA, 94143, USA
Contact Telephone:415-476-6975
Co-Authors:Marylin Dodd, Professor; Kathryn Lee, Professor
Purpose/Aims: To assess sleep disturbance and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms in injured Service Members with extremity trauma sustained during service in Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF) or Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF). Aims were to determine the prevalence and characteristics of sleep disturbance in these injured Service Members, and to compare the differences in sleep quality between those with PTSD symptoms and those without PTSD symptoms. Background: As of 2006, more than 8,500 troops have been wounded in action and not able to return to duty as a result of OEF/OIF. While a much greater percentage are surviving, new challenges face these individuals and the medical personnel caring for them. Those injured face the prospect of repeated surgeries, long recoveries, multiple complications, and psychological challenges associated with making sense of their service and injury. This study examines factors that may affect recovery using Adaptation Model as a conceptual framework. Methods: This prospective descriptive study examined baseline data for 85 Service Members who are part of a longitudinal study. Service Members were recruited as they were discharged from inpatient hospital care. The General Sleep Disturbance Scale (GSDS) was used to measure sleep quality and the PTSD Check List - Military Version (PCL-M).was used to assess PTSD symptoms. Descriptive analyses were used to characterize the prevalence and characteristics of sleep and PTSD symptoms. Independent t-tests were used evaluate group differences in sleep and PTSD. All but one are male (n=84, 99%). Ages ranged from 19 to 47 (mean = 26.5, +/- 5.6). Most are active component (n = 76, 89%), injured in (n = 74, 87%) and Army (n = 70, 82%) or Marines (n = 11, 13%). Forty-five (53%) had primarily orthopedic injures (including 30 who had undergone one or multiple amputations), 36 (42%) had primarily burn injuries, and 4 (5%) had a combination of both orthopedic and burn injuries. Findings: Sleep disturbance for 3 or more nights/week were reported by 66% (n = 57); the most frequent sleep disturbance characteristics were decreased quality of sleep (95%, n = 53) and awakenings in mid-sleep (95%, n = 53). Other characteristics included trouble initiating sleep (89%, n = 50), early awakenings (86%, n = 48), and decreased quantity of sleep (71%, n = 40). Significant PTSD symptoms (PCL-M scores cubed 44) were found in 22 of the injured Service Members (26%). As compared to Service Members without PTSD symptoms, those Service Members with symptoms reported significantly poorer sleep quality (p = 0.00), more difficulty initiating sleep (p = 0.02), daytime sleepiness (p = 0.00). Implications: This initial assessment of these data found that over half of these injured Service Members report sleep disturbance for 3 or more nights per week. The description of specific characteristics is valuable to begin to understand and treat sleep disturbance. Future studies should focus on in-depth analyses of the relationship between sleep characteristics and PTSD symptoms in order to determine pathways and targets for effective interventions to improve the long term health for our injured Service Members.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSleep Disturbance in Patients With Head and Neck Cancer Receiving Radiation Therapyen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157941-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Sleep Disturbance in Patients With Head and Neck Cancer Receiving Radiation Therapy</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Cho, Maria, RN, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of California San Francisco, Physiological Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Adjunct Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">2 Koret Way, Box 0610, San Francisco, CA, 94143, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">415-476-6975</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">maria.cho@nursing.ucsf.edu, joshlizmykids@yahoo.co</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Marylin Dodd, Professor; Kathryn Lee, Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose/Aims: To assess sleep disturbance and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms in injured Service Members with extremity trauma sustained during service in Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF) or Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF). Aims were to determine the prevalence and characteristics of sleep disturbance in these injured Service Members, and to compare the differences in sleep quality between those with PTSD symptoms and those without PTSD symptoms. Background: As of 2006, more than 8,500 troops have been wounded in action and not able to return to duty as a result of OEF/OIF. While a much greater percentage are surviving, new challenges face these individuals and the medical personnel caring for them. Those injured face the prospect of repeated surgeries, long recoveries, multiple complications, and psychological challenges associated with making sense of their service and injury. This study examines factors that may affect recovery using Adaptation Model as a conceptual framework. Methods: This prospective descriptive study examined baseline data for 85 Service Members who are part of a longitudinal study. Service Members were recruited as they were discharged from inpatient hospital care. The General Sleep Disturbance Scale (GSDS) was used to measure sleep quality and the PTSD Check List - Military Version (PCL-M).was used to assess PTSD symptoms. Descriptive analyses were used to characterize the prevalence and characteristics of sleep and PTSD symptoms. Independent t-tests were used evaluate group differences in sleep and PTSD. All but one are male (n=84, 99%). Ages ranged from 19 to 47 (mean = 26.5, +/- 5.6). Most are active component (n = 76, 89%), injured in (n = 74, 87%) and Army (n = 70, 82%) or Marines (n = 11, 13%). Forty-five (53%) had primarily orthopedic injures (including 30 who had undergone one or multiple amputations), 36 (42%) had primarily burn injuries, and 4 (5%) had a combination of both orthopedic and burn injuries. Findings: Sleep disturbance for 3 or more nights/week were reported by 66% (n = 57); the most frequent sleep disturbance characteristics were decreased quality of sleep (95%, n = 53) and awakenings in mid-sleep (95%, n = 53). Other characteristics included trouble initiating sleep (89%, n = 50), early awakenings (86%, n = 48), and decreased quantity of sleep (71%, n = 40). Significant PTSD symptoms (PCL-M scores cubed 44) were found in 22 of the injured Service Members (26%). As compared to Service Members without PTSD symptoms, those Service Members with symptoms reported significantly poorer sleep quality (p = 0.00), more difficulty initiating sleep (p = 0.02), daytime sleepiness (p = 0.00). Implications: This initial assessment of these data found that over half of these injured Service Members report sleep disturbance for 3 or more nights per week. The description of specific characteristics is valuable to begin to understand and treat sleep disturbance. Future studies should focus on in-depth analyses of the relationship between sleep characteristics and PTSD symptoms in order to determine pathways and targets for effective interventions to improve the long term health for our injured Service Members.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:21:10Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:21:10Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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