Strengths and Resources in Vulnerable Populations: Teens Mothers: Psychological Strengths, Behavioral Intentions, Sexual Risk

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157944
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Strengths and Resources in Vulnerable Populations: Teens Mothers: Psychological Strengths, Behavioral Intentions, Sexual Risk
Abstract:
Strengths and Resources in Vulnerable Populations: Teens Mothers: Psychological Strengths, Behavioral Intentions, Sexual Risk
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2005
Author:Koniak-Griffin, Deborah, EdD, RNC, FAAN
P.I. Institution Name:University of California Los Angeles School of Nursing
Title:Professor and Director
Co-Authors:Judith A. Stein
Purpose: This paper examines (a) whether an HIV prevention program for adolescent mothers based on concepts from Social Cognitive Theory (SCT) and the Theory of Reasoned Action (TRA) generates positive changes in measures of related theoretical constructs (self-efficacy, outcome expectancies, subjective norms and perceived behavioral control); and (b) the effects of these theoretical constructs, as well as past sexual behaviors, on adolescent mothers' intentions to use condoms, and on their sexual risk behaviors (unprotected sex, multiple sex partners) following the intervention. The theoretical measures in this study are believed to reflect adolescent mothers' psychological strengths. Theoretical Framework: SCT proposes two important influences as primary determinants that underlie the initiation and persistence of an adaptive behavior such as use of condoms to prevent HIV/AIDS. First, individuals must hold a strong belief in their own capability to perform a behavior (self-efficacy) and second, they must possess positive outcome expectancies or beliefs that a given behavior is likely to lead to a positive outcome. According to TRA, performance of a behavior is determined by the strength of a person's intention to perform that behavior, which, in turn, is influenced by attitudes and subjective norms. Methods: The data were collected as part of a community-based longitudinal study examining the effects of Project CHARM, an HIV prevention program for young mothers. The sample of participants (N=496) was composed predominantly of poor Latinas (78%) and African Americans (18%) with a mean age of 16.67 years. Most were unmarried and pregnant (70%) at baseline. Participants in the experimental group attended the 4-session (6-hour) HIV prevention program, whereas those in the control group received a General Health Promotion program of comparable length. Structural equation modeling with latent variables was used to assess the influence of theoretical variables and treatment condition employing data from those participants who completed questionnaires at baseline, post-intervention and at 3- and 6-month follow-ups. Results: Substantial improvements on all theoretical variables were demonstrated by both groups between pretest and 3-month follow-up, with a slight advantage for the HIV prevention group. In the predictive model, the intervention group reported significantly fewer sex partners. Using intentions to use condoms as a mediator, greater self-efficacy and hedonistic beliefs, positive subjective norms, and less unprotected sex predicted intentions to use condoms, which, in turn, predicted less unprotected sex. Lower subjective norms modestly predicted multiple partners. Significant indirect paths mediated through intentions to use condoms were observed. Implications: These data support relationships among several constructs from SCT and the TRA, and subsequent sexual risk behaviors. Adolescent mothers with high self-efficacy and positive beliefs about the outcomes of their self-protective behaviors were more likely to protect themselves from HIV/AIDS by using condoms. HIV prevention programs should be designed based on theoretical constructs indicative of young mothers' psychological strengths as well as address the influence of past behaviors on future behaviors.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleStrengths and Resources in Vulnerable Populations: Teens Mothers: Psychological Strengths, Behavioral Intentions, Sexual Risken_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157944-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Strengths and Resources in Vulnerable Populations: Teens Mothers: Psychological Strengths, Behavioral Intentions, Sexual Risk</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Koniak-Griffin, Deborah, EdD, RNC, FAAN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of California Los Angeles School of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor and Director</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">dkoniak@sonnet.ucla.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Judith A. Stein</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: This paper examines (a) whether an HIV prevention program for adolescent mothers based on concepts from Social Cognitive Theory (SCT) and the Theory of Reasoned Action (TRA) generates positive changes in measures of related theoretical constructs (self-efficacy, outcome expectancies, subjective norms and perceived behavioral control); and (b) the effects of these theoretical constructs, as well as past sexual behaviors, on adolescent mothers' intentions to use condoms, and on their sexual risk behaviors (unprotected sex, multiple sex partners) following the intervention. The theoretical measures in this study are believed to reflect adolescent mothers' psychological strengths. Theoretical Framework: SCT proposes two important influences as primary determinants that underlie the initiation and persistence of an adaptive behavior such as use of condoms to prevent HIV/AIDS. First, individuals must hold a strong belief in their own capability to perform a behavior (self-efficacy) and second, they must possess positive outcome expectancies or beliefs that a given behavior is likely to lead to a positive outcome. According to TRA, performance of a behavior is determined by the strength of a person's intention to perform that behavior, which, in turn, is influenced by attitudes and subjective norms. Methods: The data were collected as part of a community-based longitudinal study examining the effects of Project CHARM, an HIV prevention program for young mothers. The sample of participants (N=496) was composed predominantly of poor Latinas (78%) and African Americans (18%) with a mean age of 16.67 years. Most were unmarried and pregnant (70%) at baseline. Participants in the experimental group attended the 4-session (6-hour) HIV prevention program, whereas those in the control group received a General Health Promotion program of comparable length. Structural equation modeling with latent variables was used to assess the influence of theoretical variables and treatment condition employing data from those participants who completed questionnaires at baseline, post-intervention and at 3- and 6-month follow-ups. Results: Substantial improvements on all theoretical variables were demonstrated by both groups between pretest and 3-month follow-up, with a slight advantage for the HIV prevention group. In the predictive model, the intervention group reported significantly fewer sex partners. Using intentions to use condoms as a mediator, greater self-efficacy and hedonistic beliefs, positive subjective norms, and less unprotected sex predicted intentions to use condoms, which, in turn, predicted less unprotected sex. Lower subjective norms modestly predicted multiple partners. Significant indirect paths mediated through intentions to use condoms were observed. Implications: These data support relationships among several constructs from SCT and the TRA, and subsequent sexual risk behaviors. Adolescent mothers with high self-efficacy and positive beliefs about the outcomes of their self-protective behaviors were more likely to protect themselves from HIV/AIDS by using condoms. HIV prevention programs should be designed based on theoretical constructs indicative of young mothers' psychological strengths as well as address the influence of past behaviors on future behaviors.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:21:21Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:21:21Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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