2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157945
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Identifying Emotional Intelligence in Professional Practice
Abstract:
Identifying Emotional Intelligence in Professional Practice
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2005
Author:Kooker, Barbara, DrPH, MSN, RNC
P.I. Institution Name:University of Hawaii at Manoa School of Nursing & Dental Hygiene
Title:Professor
Co-Authors:Jan Shoultz
Purpose/Aims: The National Center for Health Workforce Analysis projects that the 6% shortfall of registered nurses in the United States in 2000 will double by 2010 and nearly triple to 20% by 2015 (HRSA, 2002). The recommendations of the Institute of Medicine (IOM, 2003) promote the improvement of the work environment for patient safety and highlight many issues that can lead to improved retention of the nursing workforce. Strategies to improve retention of nurses are more effective if based on realistic assessment of the practice environment. The purpose of this study was to use the conceptual framework of Emotional Intelligence to analyze nurses' stories about their practice. Rationale/Background/Conceptual Framework: The conceptual framework of Emotional Intelligence (EI) was hypothesized to be a potentially useful tool in identifying factors in stories of nursing practice that might lead to improved retention, outcomes, and productivity. Emotional Intelligence has been recognized as an influential factor in both individual and organizational performance. Goleman (2001) defined EI as "The ability to recognize and regulate emotions in self and others" and organized the EI competencies into four domains: Self Awareness, Self Management, Social Awareness, and Social/Relationship Management (Cherniss and Goleman, 2001). Methods: Sixteen stories written by nurses who had been asked to "Write a story from your lived experience where nursing knowledge made a difference" were analyzed. The stories reflect the diverse experience and settings of nursing practice. Content analysis (Downe-Wamboldt, 1992) was used to identify the competencies and domains of emotional intelligence embedded in the stories. Results reflect the micro, macro, and meta analysis of the sixteen stories. Results: All domains and competencies of EI were identified across the sixteen stories. Nurses consistently recognized their own emotions and assessed their strengths and limitations. They also had empathy and recognized client needs while expressing frustration over conflict between their individual knowledge/intuition and organizational/ system barriers. Through the stories, they demonstrated trustworthiness, adaptability and conscientiousness. They nurtured relationships, used personal influence, and were change agents. They were frustrated when their communications were disregarded or their attempts to create a shared vision and teamwork were ignored. Implications: The use of Emotional Intelligence (EI) in a practice setting can identify factors that could lead to improved retention, outcomes, and productivity. The congruence between the way nurses' knowledge dictates practice and the way the system allows them to function is critical. When conflict arises, both individual and organizational adaptability are needed to address challenges and maximize performance. An added benefit of using narrative as a strategy to analyze where nursing knowledge made a difference was that it helped nurses reach closure and may decrease burnout from unresolved conflict.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleIdentifying Emotional Intelligence in Professional Practiceen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157945-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Identifying Emotional Intelligence in Professional Practice</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Kooker, Barbara, DrPH, MSN, RNC</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Hawaii at Manoa School of Nursing &amp; Dental Hygiene</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">kooker@hawaii.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Jan Shoultz</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose/Aims: The National Center for Health Workforce Analysis projects that the 6% shortfall of registered nurses in the United States in 2000 will double by 2010 and nearly triple to 20% by 2015 (HRSA, 2002). The recommendations of the Institute of Medicine (IOM, 2003) promote the improvement of the work environment for patient safety and highlight many issues that can lead to improved retention of the nursing workforce. Strategies to improve retention of nurses are more effective if based on realistic assessment of the practice environment. The purpose of this study was to use the conceptual framework of Emotional Intelligence to analyze nurses' stories about their practice. Rationale/Background/Conceptual Framework: The conceptual framework of Emotional Intelligence (EI) was hypothesized to be a potentially useful tool in identifying factors in stories of nursing practice that might lead to improved retention, outcomes, and productivity. Emotional Intelligence has been recognized as an influential factor in both individual and organizational performance. Goleman (2001) defined EI as &quot;The ability to recognize and regulate emotions in self and others&quot; and organized the EI competencies into four domains: Self Awareness, Self Management, Social Awareness, and Social/Relationship Management (Cherniss and Goleman, 2001). Methods: Sixteen stories written by nurses who had been asked to &quot;Write a story from your lived experience where nursing knowledge made a difference&quot; were analyzed. The stories reflect the diverse experience and settings of nursing practice. Content analysis (Downe-Wamboldt, 1992) was used to identify the competencies and domains of emotional intelligence embedded in the stories. Results reflect the micro, macro, and meta analysis of the sixteen stories. Results: All domains and competencies of EI were identified across the sixteen stories. Nurses consistently recognized their own emotions and assessed their strengths and limitations. They also had empathy and recognized client needs while expressing frustration over conflict between their individual knowledge/intuition and organizational/ system barriers. Through the stories, they demonstrated trustworthiness, adaptability and conscientiousness. They nurtured relationships, used personal influence, and were change agents. They were frustrated when their communications were disregarded or their attempts to create a shared vision and teamwork were ignored. Implications: The use of Emotional Intelligence (EI) in a practice setting can identify factors that could lead to improved retention, outcomes, and productivity. The congruence between the way nurses' knowledge dictates practice and the way the system allows them to function is critical. When conflict arises, both individual and organizational adaptability are needed to address challenges and maximize performance. An added benefit of using narrative as a strategy to analyze where nursing knowledge made a difference was that it helped nurses reach closure and may decrease burnout from unresolved conflict.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:21:24Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:21:24Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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