2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157946
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Nurses' Perceptions of the Work Environment in a Tertiary Pediatric Setting
Abstract:
Nurses' Perceptions of the Work Environment in a Tertiary Pediatric Setting
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2005
Author:Kotzer, Anne Marie, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:The Children's Hospital Nursing Administration
Title:Director of Nursing Research
Co-Authors:Dianne Koepping, Karen LeDuc
Background/Purpose: Nurse job satisfaction is a complex phenomenon and includes multiple elements of the work environment. Assessing the nursing work environment can provide valuable information that has been correlated with job satisfaction and retention. Organizations must develop appropriate intervention strategies to introduce positive change and to retain qualified nursing staff. The purposes of this pilot study were to describe and compare staff nurses' perception of their real and ideal work environment; and to construct a demographic profile of nursing staff on study units. Methodology: Using a descriptive survey design, a convenience sample of 145 nurses on three inpatient units at a large pediatric tertiary care facility were surveyed utilizing a demographics questionnaire and the Work Environment Scale (WES) (Moos, 1994). The WES includes assessment forms for the real and ideal work environment and consists of ten subscales within three dimensions; Relationships (involvement, peer cohesion, supervisor support), Personal Growth (autonomy, task orientation, work pressure), and System Maintenance and Change (clarity, control, innovation, physical comfort). Participating in the study were the Cardiac Intensive Care Unit (CICU), the Ortho/Neuro/Trauma/Rehabilitation Unit (Inpatient), and the Emergency Department (ED). Participation was voluntary and anonymous. Analysis and Findings: Descriptive, inferential, and correlational statistics were used to analyze the data. Survey response rates were 68% (CICU), 51% (Inpatient), and 45% (ED). The majority of respondents worked full-time, were mid-level staff nurses, ranged in age from 20 to 35 years, and worked as an RN < 6 years. Interestingly, the younger and less experienced staff nurses responded to the survey. Overall, nurses on the pilot units affirmed a very positive work environment at this organization. Staff perceived high (6.0 to 8.8/9.0) levels of involvement, peer cohesion, supervisor support, autonomy, task orientation, clarity, and control in their work environment. Scores for work pressure, innovation, and physical comfort were moderate (4.4 to 5.7/9.0), reflecting opportunities for improvement in these areas. Statistically significant differences were seen between all real and ideal subscale scores, except for control and involvement, suggesting that nurses were satisfied with the level of managerial control on their units and the extent to which staff were concerned about and committed to their jobs. Implications for Nursing: Evaluation of the work environment may help to identify characteristics of the organization that impact nurse job satisfaction and retention. Significance differences seen between selected real and ideal subscale scores may help prioritize and direct intervention strategies to enhance the work environment and ultimately retain qualified nursing staff.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleNurses' Perceptions of the Work Environment in a Tertiary Pediatric Settingen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157946-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Nurses' Perceptions of the Work Environment in a Tertiary Pediatric Setting</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Kotzer, Anne Marie, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">The Children's Hospital Nursing Administration</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Director of Nursing Research</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">kotzer.annemarie@tchden.org</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Dianne Koepping, Karen LeDuc</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Background/Purpose: Nurse job satisfaction is a complex phenomenon and includes multiple elements of the work environment. Assessing the nursing work environment can provide valuable information that has been correlated with job satisfaction and retention. Organizations must develop appropriate intervention strategies to introduce positive change and to retain qualified nursing staff. The purposes of this pilot study were to describe and compare staff nurses' perception of their real and ideal work environment; and to construct a demographic profile of nursing staff on study units. Methodology: Using a descriptive survey design, a convenience sample of 145 nurses on three inpatient units at a large pediatric tertiary care facility were surveyed utilizing a demographics questionnaire and the Work Environment Scale (WES) (Moos, 1994). The WES includes assessment forms for the real and ideal work environment and consists of ten subscales within three dimensions; Relationships (involvement, peer cohesion, supervisor support), Personal Growth (autonomy, task orientation, work pressure), and System Maintenance and Change (clarity, control, innovation, physical comfort). Participating in the study were the Cardiac Intensive Care Unit (CICU), the Ortho/Neuro/Trauma/Rehabilitation Unit (Inpatient), and the Emergency Department (ED). Participation was voluntary and anonymous. Analysis and Findings: Descriptive, inferential, and correlational statistics were used to analyze the data. Survey response rates were 68% (CICU), 51% (Inpatient), and 45% (ED). The majority of respondents worked full-time, were mid-level staff nurses, ranged in age from 20 to 35 years, and worked as an RN &lt; 6 years. Interestingly, the younger and less experienced staff nurses responded to the survey. Overall, nurses on the pilot units affirmed a very positive work environment at this organization. Staff perceived high (6.0 to 8.8/9.0) levels of involvement, peer cohesion, supervisor support, autonomy, task orientation, clarity, and control in their work environment. Scores for work pressure, innovation, and physical comfort were moderate (4.4 to 5.7/9.0), reflecting opportunities for improvement in these areas. Statistically significant differences were seen between all real and ideal subscale scores, except for control and involvement, suggesting that nurses were satisfied with the level of managerial control on their units and the extent to which staff were concerned about and committed to their jobs. Implications for Nursing: Evaluation of the work environment may help to identify characteristics of the organization that impact nurse job satisfaction and retention. Significance differences seen between selected real and ideal subscale scores may help prioritize and direct intervention strategies to enhance the work environment and ultimately retain qualified nursing staff.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:21:28Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:21:28Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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