2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157948
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Needs of Rural Public Health Workers to Participate in Health Tracking
Abstract:
The Needs of Rural Public Health Workers to Participate in Health Tracking
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2005
Author:Kuntz, Sandra, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Montana State University College of Nursing
Title:Assistant Professor
Co-Authors:Wade Hill
Problem: The successful establishment of an environmental public health tracking system in Montana requires active participation of public health nurses as they represent the largest professional group participating in the public health workforce. Notably, nurses in general are thought to be unprepared to address environmental health concerns, and determinants of incorporating environmental health (EH) into nursing practice have been identified (Van Dongen, 2002). However, previous research on facilitators and barriers to incorporating EH into nursing practice has not focused in either public health nurses (who are more likely to encounter environmental health problems) or considered the unique qualities of nurses that work in rural environments. Description of Project: Survey methods were employed to identify facilitators and barriers to addressing environmental health concerns for Montana Public Health Nurses. A tailored instrument was developed that included the Barriers (7 items) and Facilitators (8 items) subscales from Van Dongen's (2002) survey. A multi-mode (web-based & paper/pencil) survey was delivered to public health nurses according to the Dillman Method and yielded a 76% response rate (n = 163). Findings: Public health nurses stated that the most important barriers to addressing environmental health concerns in their practice include "Little or no time to consider environmental health concerns in my clinical practice" (42% stated barrier/major barrier), and "Clients/families have little interest in understanding how the environment can affect their health" (42% stated barrier/major barrier). Important facilitators for addressing EH concerns in nursing practice include "Environmental health educational programs at my work place" (28% stated helpful/very helpful) and "Free or inexpensive continuing education programs on environmental health via the internet or other distance learning" (28% stated helpful/very helpful). Implications: Results suggest that while public health nurses perceive that they have too little time to address EH concerns and that client's and families may not place priority on EH concerns, there appears to be significant interest in continuing education related to EH. Our results contrast Van Dongen (2002) who used a random sample of Wisconsin RNs (173 respondents) to find that the priority barrier among a general nursing sample was "Few or no resource people with expertise related to environmental health." While the reasons for this contrast are unknown, possible explanations include differences in the structure and function of work environments or differences resulting from the time that each survey was conducted. Interestingly, an important similarity was also identified between our efforts and Van Dongen's work. In both cases, nurses stated that an important facilitator to incorporating EH into their practice would be free or inexpensive continuing education offered via distance learning.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Needs of Rural Public Health Workers to Participate in Health Trackingen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157948-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Needs of Rural Public Health Workers to Participate in Health Tracking</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Kuntz, Sandra, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Montana State University College of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">skuntz@montana.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Wade Hill</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Problem: The successful establishment of an environmental public health tracking system in Montana requires active participation of public health nurses as they represent the largest professional group participating in the public health workforce. Notably, nurses in general are thought to be unprepared to address environmental health concerns, and determinants of incorporating environmental health (EH) into nursing practice have been identified (Van Dongen, 2002). However, previous research on facilitators and barriers to incorporating EH into nursing practice has not focused in either public health nurses (who are more likely to encounter environmental health problems) or considered the unique qualities of nurses that work in rural environments. Description of Project: Survey methods were employed to identify facilitators and barriers to addressing environmental health concerns for Montana Public Health Nurses. A tailored instrument was developed that included the Barriers (7 items) and Facilitators (8 items) subscales from Van Dongen's (2002) survey. A multi-mode (web-based &amp; paper/pencil) survey was delivered to public health nurses according to the Dillman Method and yielded a 76% response rate (n = 163). Findings: Public health nurses stated that the most important barriers to addressing environmental health concerns in their practice include &quot;Little or no time to consider environmental health concerns in my clinical practice&quot; (42% stated barrier/major barrier), and &quot;Clients/families have little interest in understanding how the environment can affect their health&quot; (42% stated barrier/major barrier). Important facilitators for addressing EH concerns in nursing practice include &quot;Environmental health educational programs at my work place&quot; (28% stated helpful/very helpful) and &quot;Free or inexpensive continuing education programs on environmental health via the internet or other distance learning&quot; (28% stated helpful/very helpful). Implications: Results suggest that while public health nurses perceive that they have too little time to address EH concerns and that client's and families may not place priority on EH concerns, there appears to be significant interest in continuing education related to EH. Our results contrast Van Dongen (2002) who used a random sample of Wisconsin RNs (173 respondents) to find that the priority barrier among a general nursing sample was &quot;Few or no resource people with expertise related to environmental health.&quot; While the reasons for this contrast are unknown, possible explanations include differences in the structure and function of work environments or differences resulting from the time that each survey was conducted. Interestingly, an important similarity was also identified between our efforts and Van Dongen's work. In both cases, nurses stated that an important facilitator to incorporating EH into their practice would be free or inexpensive continuing education offered via distance learning.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:21:35Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:21:35Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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