2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157950
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Characterization of Women's Occupational Musculoskeletal Exposures
Abstract:
Characterization of Women's Occupational Musculoskeletal Exposures
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2005
Author:Landry, Lynette, RN, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:San Francisco State University
Title:Assistant Professor
Women comprise greater than 50% of the workforce in the United States and though women are often characterized as participating in safe occupations, they are at risk of experiencing an injury as a result of their occupational musculoskeletal exposures. Aim: The purpose of this study was to examine a woman's demographic characteristics, health status including physician diagnosed illness or injury, perceived health status, occupation and job tasks to characterize the risk of occupational injury among a group of working women. Methods: This cross-sectional study included a random sample of women who were employed in the 12 months prior to survey administration (n=123, 27% response rate). A telephone survey consisting of 154 items was administered in English or Spanish. Results: Most women were employed full time (mean hours worked per week = 36.8). The mean number of musculoskeletal exposures women experienced at work was 1.98 (SD=1.25). Women tended to be clustered into two types of occupational exposure, either strenuous physical activity and repeated bending, twisting or reaching (26.8%) or repetitive hand motion and static posture (40.7%). Overall women rated their health as excellent but those women with a diagnosed musculoskeletal disorder had significantly lower scores on two scales (Physical Functioning and Bodily Pain) of the SF36 than those without a musculoskeletal disorder and the normative sample for the SF36. Conclusion: Study results validate previous research indicating that, though women's jobs are considered safe, women are exposed to occupational musculoskeletal stressors that increase their risk of experiencing a musculoskeletal injury. The low response rate, however, suggests that the results have limited generalizability.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCharacterization of Women's Occupational Musculoskeletal Exposuresen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157950-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Characterization of Women's Occupational Musculoskeletal Exposures</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Landry, Lynette, RN, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">San Francisco State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">llandry@sfsu.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Women comprise greater than 50% of the workforce in the United States and though women are often characterized as participating in safe occupations, they are at risk of experiencing an injury as a result of their occupational musculoskeletal exposures. Aim: The purpose of this study was to examine a woman's demographic characteristics, health status including physician diagnosed illness or injury, perceived health status, occupation and job tasks to characterize the risk of occupational injury among a group of working women. Methods: This cross-sectional study included a random sample of women who were employed in the 12 months prior to survey administration (n=123, 27% response rate). A telephone survey consisting of 154 items was administered in English or Spanish. Results: Most women were employed full time (mean hours worked per week = 36.8). The mean number of musculoskeletal exposures women experienced at work was 1.98 (SD=1.25). Women tended to be clustered into two types of occupational exposure, either strenuous physical activity and repeated bending, twisting or reaching (26.8%) or repetitive hand motion and static posture (40.7%). Overall women rated their health as excellent but those women with a diagnosed musculoskeletal disorder had significantly lower scores on two scales (Physical Functioning and Bodily Pain) of the SF36 than those without a musculoskeletal disorder and the normative sample for the SF36. Conclusion: Study results validate previous research indicating that, though women's jobs are considered safe, women are exposed to occupational musculoskeletal stressors that increase their risk of experiencing a musculoskeletal injury. The low response rate, however, suggests that the results have limited generalizability.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:21:42Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:21:42Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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