Participatory Research to Address Issue of HBV Vaccination and Liver Cancer: The Rate of Serum Hbsag and Hbsab Among Korean Americans

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157953
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Participatory Research to Address Issue of HBV Vaccination and Liver Cancer: The Rate of Serum Hbsag and Hbsab Among Korean Americans
Abstract:
Participatory Research to Address Issue of HBV Vaccination and Liver Cancer: The Rate of Serum Hbsag and Hbsab Among Korean Americans
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2005
Author:Lee, Haeok, RN, DNSc
P.I. Institution Name:University of Colorado Health Science Center, School of Nursing
Title:Associate Professor
Co-Authors:OkJa Lee, Mee Young Im, Ivy Hontz, Amy Warner
Purpose: To conduct a community-based participatory study to understand the frequency of hepatitis B infection by blood screening partnering with the Korean Americans (KA) in the Rocky Mountain area. Background: The high chronic hepatitis B infection rate in Asian Pacific Islanders (APIs) result in a high-risk of premature death due to cirrhosis or hepatoma. Liver cancer rates among APIs are 11.7 times greater than those of the white population. However, evidence shows that cancer resulting from the Hepatitis B Virus (HBV) can be prevented through vaccinations. Eliminating health disparities is the primary goal of Healthy People 2010, and reliable data is imperative to achieving this goal. In Section 9; Infection and Immunization, all of the 31 sub-objectives were coded showing deficiency in data: the sub-objectives were consistently either data have not been analyzed, data have not been collected, or data are statistically unreliable. Method: 179 KAs participated in this Community-Based Participatory Research (CBPR) to receive HBV blood screening tests at two Korean churches. Men and women between 18 and 70 years of age who speak or read either Korean or English were eligible for this study. Hepatitis B screening and liver and kidney function tests were given at no cost at two Korean churches. Since a blood glucose test was included, blood was drawn by registered nurses after a 12-hour fast. After centrifuge of the blood at the churches, conducted by the research team, the blood was delivered to the University Hospital laboratory for final analysis by the Private Instigator (PI). Vaccination information was obtained from 111 KAs, using a standard data collection sheet including date of vaccination, place of vaccination (Korea or U.S.), and the completion of series of three shots. Results: The serological results showed 3% were positive for serum HbsAg, and 57% were positive for serum HBsAb. This data provides information of the rate of HBV infection in KAs, since there is no data prevalent of HBV infection of KAs in the Rocky Mountain area. Only 20 out of 111 Korean Americans (18%) reported that they had received a hepatitis B vaccination, however, only 6 reported (5%) that they received a series of three vaccinations. Surprisingly, all of the vaccinations except one were received in Korea, not the U.S. Implications: The study provided physiological data of hepatitis B infection and hepatitis B antibody from free hepatitis B screening tests. Serum HBsAb indicated either a past vaccination history, or exposure to HBV previously. Based on the low report of vaccination, it could be concluded that the majority of Koreans were exposed to HBV and they are at high risk to be infected by HBV. Therefore, providing vaccinations to KAs who are not positive for serum HBsAg is imperative.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleParticipatory Research to Address Issue of HBV Vaccination and Liver Cancer: The Rate of Serum Hbsag and Hbsab Among Korean Americansen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157953-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Participatory Research to Address Issue of HBV Vaccination and Liver Cancer: The Rate of Serum Hbsag and Hbsab Among Korean Americans</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Lee, Haeok, RN, DNSc</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Colorado Health Science Center, School of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">haeok.lee@uchsc.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">OkJa Lee, Mee Young Im, Ivy Hontz, Amy Warner</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: To conduct a community-based participatory study to understand the frequency of hepatitis B infection by blood screening partnering with the Korean Americans (KA) in the Rocky Mountain area. Background: The high chronic hepatitis B infection rate in Asian Pacific Islanders (APIs) result in a high-risk of premature death due to cirrhosis or hepatoma. Liver cancer rates among APIs are 11.7 times greater than those of the white population. However, evidence shows that cancer resulting from the Hepatitis B Virus (HBV) can be prevented through vaccinations. Eliminating health disparities is the primary goal of Healthy People 2010, and reliable data is imperative to achieving this goal. In Section 9; Infection and Immunization, all of the 31 sub-objectives were coded showing deficiency in data: the sub-objectives were consistently either data have not been analyzed, data have not been collected, or data are statistically unreliable. Method: 179 KAs participated in this Community-Based Participatory Research (CBPR) to receive HBV blood screening tests at two Korean churches. Men and women between 18 and 70 years of age who speak or read either Korean or English were eligible for this study. Hepatitis B screening and liver and kidney function tests were given at no cost at two Korean churches. Since a blood glucose test was included, blood was drawn by registered nurses after a 12-hour fast. After centrifuge of the blood at the churches, conducted by the research team, the blood was delivered to the University Hospital laboratory for final analysis by the Private Instigator (PI). Vaccination information was obtained from 111 KAs, using a standard data collection sheet including date of vaccination, place of vaccination (Korea or U.S.), and the completion of series of three shots. Results: The serological results showed 3% were positive for serum HbsAg, and 57% were positive for serum HBsAb. This data provides information of the rate of HBV infection in KAs, since there is no data prevalent of HBV infection of KAs in the Rocky Mountain area. Only 20 out of 111 Korean Americans (18%) reported that they had received a hepatitis B vaccination, however, only 6 reported (5%) that they received a series of three vaccinations. Surprisingly, all of the vaccinations except one were received in Korea, not the U.S. Implications: The study provided physiological data of hepatitis B infection and hepatitis B antibody from free hepatitis B screening tests. Serum HBsAb indicated either a past vaccination history, or exposure to HBV previously. Based on the low report of vaccination, it could be concluded that the majority of Koreans were exposed to HBV and they are at high risk to be infected by HBV. Therefore, providing vaccinations to KAs who are not positive for serum HBsAg is imperative.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:21:53Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:21:53Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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