Participatory Research to Address Issue of HBV Vaccination and Liver Cancer: Integration of a Participatory Research into a Church-Based Health Survey

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157954
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Participatory Research to Address Issue of HBV Vaccination and Liver Cancer: Integration of a Participatory Research into a Church-Based Health Survey
Abstract:
Participatory Research to Address Issue of HBV Vaccination and Liver Cancer: Integration of a Participatory Research into a Church-Based Health Survey
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2005
Author:Lee, Haeok, RN, DNSc
P.I. Institution Name:University of Colorado Health Science Center, School of Nursing
Title:Associate Professor
Co-Authors:OkJa Lee, Mee Young Im
Purpose: To explore knowledge of Hepatitis B Virus (HBV) and liver cancer as well as social and cultural determinants of the hepatitis B infection and liver disease among Korean Americans (KA). Background: The low-level of Asian Pacific Islander's (API) knowledge of hepatitis B and immunization points need to provide culturally tailored hepatitis B infection education. However, we have little information on APIs knowledge of hepatitis B and health behaviors related to vaccination; as a result, it is difficult to develop an effective hepatitis B prevention program for APIs. Moreover, it is commonly thought that heavy alcohol consumption is a major cause of liver disease and liver cancer, but there are no data to confirm this. Lack of data on the very diverse API ethnic subgroups in the U.S. has hampered efforts to understand the problem and develop interventions to reduce long-standing racial and ethnic disparities in health. Providing reliable data is the first step in reducing health disparities. Methods: A community-based participatory research was implemented at two Korean churches to develop baseline data on HBV infection and vaccination behavior. Survey was conducted at the two churches and 111 KAs participated. All documents including questionnaires, consent forms, brochures, and announcements used were in Korean. The questionnaires and informant consent forms were given to the participants through Advisory Council (AC) members in order to give the participant enough time to read in advance on the recommendation from church stockholders and AC members. However, trained Korean interviewers collected the survey questionnaires by reviewing the questionnaires with the participants at the churches. Results: Forty-five percent of participants thought that alcohol could cause liver cancer, 42% smoking, and 64% stress. Nineteen percent thought that HBV infected through air, 58% by sharing utensils, and 23% believed that HBV is heredity, while only 16% thought that HBV infected through sexual relationship. Surprisingly, only one participant reported that a physician recommended the hepatitis B vaccination for the participant and participant's children. Sixty four percent reported that they never thought about vaccination because there was no reason, 62% because they were healthy, and 61%, because the doctor did not recommend it. The usual source for health information including nutrition, exercise, or medical services was: 52% from Korean media, such as a Korean newspaper, TV, or radio; 62% from friends or relatives; and 46% from churches, 32% from a western medical center, and 31% from oriental medical center. The majority of participants (61%) rated their English level as "minimum". Forty-nine percent reported that language and cost was a barrier to health care. Forty percent reported that they do not have any type of health insurance. Implications: The survey revealed the low-level of knowledge of HBV infection and vaccination is problematic therefore, community education is imperative. Several factors have been identified as obstacles to health care and vaccination including language barriers, lack of health insurance, and inability to use medical system in the U.S.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleParticipatory Research to Address Issue of HBV Vaccination and Liver Cancer: Integration of a Participatory Research into a Church-Based Health Surveyen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157954-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Participatory Research to Address Issue of HBV Vaccination and Liver Cancer: Integration of a Participatory Research into a Church-Based Health Survey</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Lee, Haeok, RN, DNSc</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Colorado Health Science Center, School of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">haeok.lee@uchsc.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">OkJa Lee, Mee Young Im</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: To explore knowledge of Hepatitis B Virus (HBV) and liver cancer as well as social and cultural determinants of the hepatitis B infection and liver disease among Korean Americans (KA). Background: The low-level of Asian Pacific Islander's (API) knowledge of hepatitis B and immunization points need to provide culturally tailored hepatitis B infection education. However, we have little information on APIs knowledge of hepatitis B and health behaviors related to vaccination; as a result, it is difficult to develop an effective hepatitis B prevention program for APIs. Moreover, it is commonly thought that heavy alcohol consumption is a major cause of liver disease and liver cancer, but there are no data to confirm this. Lack of data on the very diverse API ethnic subgroups in the U.S. has hampered efforts to understand the problem and develop interventions to reduce long-standing racial and ethnic disparities in health. Providing reliable data is the first step in reducing health disparities. Methods: A community-based participatory research was implemented at two Korean churches to develop baseline data on HBV infection and vaccination behavior. Survey was conducted at the two churches and 111 KAs participated. All documents including questionnaires, consent forms, brochures, and announcements used were in Korean. The questionnaires and informant consent forms were given to the participants through Advisory Council (AC) members in order to give the participant enough time to read in advance on the recommendation from church stockholders and AC members. However, trained Korean interviewers collected the survey questionnaires by reviewing the questionnaires with the participants at the churches. Results: Forty-five percent of participants thought that alcohol could cause liver cancer, 42% smoking, and 64% stress. Nineteen percent thought that HBV infected through air, 58% by sharing utensils, and 23% believed that HBV is heredity, while only 16% thought that HBV infected through sexual relationship. Surprisingly, only one participant reported that a physician recommended the hepatitis B vaccination for the participant and participant's children. Sixty four percent reported that they never thought about vaccination because there was no reason, 62% because they were healthy, and 61%, because the doctor did not recommend it. The usual source for health information including nutrition, exercise, or medical services was: 52% from Korean media, such as a Korean newspaper, TV, or radio; 62% from friends or relatives; and 46% from churches, 32% from a western medical center, and 31% from oriental medical center. The majority of participants (61%) rated their English level as &quot;minimum&quot;. Forty-nine percent reported that language and cost was a barrier to health care. Forty percent reported that they do not have any type of health insurance. Implications: The survey revealed the low-level of knowledge of HBV infection and vaccination is problematic therefore, community education is imperative. Several factors have been identified as obstacles to health care and vaccination including language barriers, lack of health insurance, and inability to use medical system in the U.S.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:21:57Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:21:57Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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