2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157957
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Couple-Focused HIV Prevention for Latino Teen Parents: A Feasibility Test
Abstract:
Couple-Focused HIV Prevention for Latino Teen Parents: A Feasibility Test
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2005
Author:Lesser, Janna, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Texas HSC at San Antonio
Title:Assistant Professor
Co-Authors:Deborah Koniak-Griffin
Purpose: Community and academic partners developed and pilot-tested a couple-focused HIV prevention program intended both to serve the unique needs of Latino teen mothers and fathers and be realistic for implementation in community-based settings. Background: Many teen mothers and fathers have engaged in high-risk activities that have placed them at risk for HIV prior to their parenthood, including unprotected sexual activity and heavy alcohol and drug use. While teen mothers have benefited from community services such as pregnant minor and parent education programs, and to a lesser extent, HIV prevention services, teen fathers have been greatly ignored and generally underserved. In collaboration with a community-based organization (CBO) already successful in providing innovative services to teen fathers, we developed and pilot-tested a culturally tailored HIV prevention program for young parenting couples. Methods: The curriculum for the program was developed based on principles from "Healing the Wounded Spirit" (Tello, 1998), the theory of gender and power, social cognitive theory and the theory of reasoned action. This study examined the feasibility of implementing the couple-focused HIV prevention program for teen parents and compared the outcomes of this program with a "standard" HIV education control condition. Recruitment sites included the partnering CBO, 3 additional CBOs, and 7 alternative schools. The sample included 49 couples. Participants completed written questionnaires in English or Spanish pre- and post-intervention, and at 3- and 6- month follow-up. The instrument packet contained a combination of scales and individual items designed to measure key outcomes (e.g., sexual risk behaviors), as well as selected socio-demographic characteristics. Results: There was a statistically significant difference, for both males and females, in decrease of proportion of unprotected sex episodes over time between the intervention and control groups. Both groups increased significantly on AIDS knowledge over time. Implications: The building of a community's capacity to promote health and prevent disease through community-academic collaborative research is demonstrated in this project. The partners were able to develop an HIV prevention program well accepted by inner city Latino adolescent fathers and mothers that was also realistic for implementation in the community setting. This same approach, community-academic partnerships developed to respond to community needs, can be adapted to fit the concerns of other groups engaged in prevention of HIV and other diseases.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCouple-Focused HIV Prevention for Latino Teen Parents: A Feasibility Testen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157957-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Couple-Focused HIV Prevention for Latino Teen Parents: A Feasibility Test</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Lesser, Janna, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Texas HSC at San Antonio</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">lesser@uthscsa.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Deborah Koniak-Griffin</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: Community and academic partners developed and pilot-tested a couple-focused HIV prevention program intended both to serve the unique needs of Latino teen mothers and fathers and be realistic for implementation in community-based settings. Background: Many teen mothers and fathers have engaged in high-risk activities that have placed them at risk for HIV prior to their parenthood, including unprotected sexual activity and heavy alcohol and drug use. While teen mothers have benefited from community services such as pregnant minor and parent education programs, and to a lesser extent, HIV prevention services, teen fathers have been greatly ignored and generally underserved. In collaboration with a community-based organization (CBO) already successful in providing innovative services to teen fathers, we developed and pilot-tested a culturally tailored HIV prevention program for young parenting couples. Methods: The curriculum for the program was developed based on principles from &quot;Healing the Wounded Spirit&quot; (Tello, 1998), the theory of gender and power, social cognitive theory and the theory of reasoned action. This study examined the feasibility of implementing the couple-focused HIV prevention program for teen parents and compared the outcomes of this program with a &quot;standard&quot; HIV education control condition. Recruitment sites included the partnering CBO, 3 additional CBOs, and 7 alternative schools. The sample included 49 couples. Participants completed written questionnaires in English or Spanish pre- and post-intervention, and at 3- and 6- month follow-up. The instrument packet contained a combination of scales and individual items designed to measure key outcomes (e.g., sexual risk behaviors), as well as selected socio-demographic characteristics. Results: There was a statistically significant difference, for both males and females, in decrease of proportion of unprotected sex episodes over time between the intervention and control groups. Both groups increased significantly on AIDS knowledge over time. Implications: The building of a community's capacity to promote health and prevent disease through community-academic collaborative research is demonstrated in this project. The partners were able to develop an HIV prevention program well accepted by inner city Latino adolescent fathers and mothers that was also realistic for implementation in the community setting. This same approach, community-academic partnerships developed to respond to community needs, can be adapted to fit the concerns of other groups engaged in prevention of HIV and other diseases.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:22:08Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:22:08Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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