2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157958
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Gender Differences in Chinese Immigrants with Hypertension: Clinic Factors
Abstract:
Gender Differences in Chinese Immigrants with Hypertension: Clinic Factors
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2005
Author:Li, Wen-Wen, RN, MS, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Asian Health Clinic
Title:Clinic Coordinator
Co-Authors:Erika S. Froelicher
Purpose: To describe gender differences in hypertension (HPT) control (<140/90 mmHg), antihypertensive medication compliance (MC) (defined as patients taking at least 80% of their prescribed medications), and demographic, language, cultural and clinical factors in Chinese immigrants. Significance: HPT remains inadequately controlled in the general U.S. population. Little is known about HPT management among Chinese immigrants. Moreover, gender differences among Chinese immigrants are rarely studied in research. Understanding gender differences among Chinese immigrants with HPT can help amend nursing interventions for Chinese men and women to achieve optimal blood pressure (BP) control. This study will provide information about gender differences in this underserved population. Methods: A cross-sectional design was used. A convenience sample of 100 men and 100 women was recruited from an Asian health clinic in the San Francisco Bay area. Inclusion criteria were: Chinese immigrant > 18 years old, taking Western HPT medications, and able to speak Mandarin. Data collection included medical record abstraction, self-report questionnaires, and BP measurements using the Joint National Committee VI standard procedures. The SPSS 11.0 software was used for data entry, management and analysis. T-test was used to test gender differences of continuous variables. Chi-square was used to test gender differences of categorical variables. All t-test and chi-square values were considered significant at a coefficient of .05. Results: There was no difference between men and women in age (70¦11 vs. 71¦10 years, p=.73) and length of stay in the U.S. (13¦7 vs. 13¦8 years, p=.80). More men were married (84% vs. 56%, p = .00) and lived with a family member/friend (89% vs. 78%, p = .04). A lower proportion of men were poor (<$10,000/year) (36% vs. 59%, p = .04), believed in religion (49% vs. 67%, p = .01), and could not speak (31% vs. 50%, p = .03) or read (40% vs. 60%, p = .02) English at all. A small, yet slightly higher proportion of men preferred using English to communicate with their health care provider (4% vs. 0%, p = .04). A greater proportion of men reported being a current smoker or having ever smoked (41% vs. 4%, p = .00). Fewer men used Chinese herbs to treat HPT (4% vs.15%, p = .03). Mean BP (SD) for men and women was similar (139¦15/78¦11 vs. 141¦16/76¦11 mmHg). HPT control was equally low for men and women (52% and 50%, p=.78). The proportion of MC between men and women was 71% and 78% (p=.26), respectively. Conclusions and Implications: HPT control appeared equally low for men and women. Compared to men, women had less social support, were poorer, less educated, and more religious, and used more Chinese herbs to treat HPT. The complex situation of Chinese immigrant women should be taken into consideration when developing nursing interventions for this population to manage their HPT. For Chinese immigrant men, the high proportion of smokers suggests that smoking cessation is an urgent health care priority. Moreover, since the evidence shows that smoking is significantly associated with high BP, smoking cessation should be integrated into nursing interventions to help Chinese immigrant men achieve optimal HPT control.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleGender Differences in Chinese Immigrants with Hypertension: Clinic Factorsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157958-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Gender Differences in Chinese Immigrants with Hypertension: Clinic Factors</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Li, Wen-Wen, RN, MS, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Asian Health Clinic</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Clinic Coordinator</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">wenwenli@yahoo.com</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Erika S. Froelicher</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: To describe gender differences in hypertension (HPT) control (&lt;140/90 mmHg), antihypertensive medication compliance (MC) (defined as patients taking at least 80% of their prescribed medications), and demographic, language, cultural and clinical factors in Chinese immigrants. Significance: HPT remains inadequately controlled in the general U.S. population. Little is known about HPT management among Chinese immigrants. Moreover, gender differences among Chinese immigrants are rarely studied in research. Understanding gender differences among Chinese immigrants with HPT can help amend nursing interventions for Chinese men and women to achieve optimal blood pressure (BP) control. This study will provide information about gender differences in this underserved population. Methods: A cross-sectional design was used. A convenience sample of 100 men and 100 women was recruited from an Asian health clinic in the San Francisco Bay area. Inclusion criteria were: Chinese immigrant &gt; 18 years old, taking Western HPT medications, and able to speak Mandarin. Data collection included medical record abstraction, self-report questionnaires, and BP measurements using the Joint National Committee VI standard procedures. The SPSS 11.0 software was used for data entry, management and analysis. T-test was used to test gender differences of continuous variables. Chi-square was used to test gender differences of categorical variables. All t-test and chi-square values were considered significant at a coefficient of .05. Results: There was no difference between men and women in age (70&brvbar;11 vs. 71&brvbar;10 years, p=.73) and length of stay in the U.S. (13&brvbar;7 vs. 13&brvbar;8 years, p=.80). More men were married (84% vs. 56%, p = .00) and lived with a family member/friend (89% vs. 78%, p = .04). A lower proportion of men were poor (&lt;$10,000/year) (36% vs. 59%, p = .04), believed in religion (49% vs. 67%, p = .01), and could not speak (31% vs. 50%, p = .03) or read (40% vs. 60%, p = .02) English at all. A small, yet slightly higher proportion of men preferred using English to communicate with their health care provider (4% vs. 0%, p = .04). A greater proportion of men reported being a current smoker or having ever smoked (41% vs. 4%, p = .00). Fewer men used Chinese herbs to treat HPT (4% vs.15%, p = .03). Mean BP (SD) for men and women was similar (139&brvbar;15/78&brvbar;11 vs. 141&brvbar;16/76&brvbar;11 mmHg). HPT control was equally low for men and women (52% and 50%, p=.78). The proportion of MC between men and women was 71% and 78% (p=.26), respectively. Conclusions and Implications: HPT control appeared equally low for men and women. Compared to men, women had less social support, were poorer, less educated, and more religious, and used more Chinese herbs to treat HPT. The complex situation of Chinese immigrant women should be taken into consideration when developing nursing interventions for this population to manage their HPT. For Chinese immigrant men, the high proportion of smokers suggests that smoking cessation is an urgent health care priority. Moreover, since the evidence shows that smoking is significantly associated with high BP, smoking cessation should be integrated into nursing interventions to help Chinese immigrant men achieve optimal HPT control.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:22:11Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:22:11Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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