2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157959
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Multiple Birth Parents' Birth and NICU Stressors and Experiences
Abstract:
Multiple Birth Parents' Birth and NICU Stressors and Experiences
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2005
Author:Lutz, Kristin, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Oregon Health & Science University School of Nursing
Title:Postdoctoral Fellow
The incidence of multiple births has risen 65% for twins and 404% for triplets and higher order multiples since 1980. Multiple birth (MB) infants are more likely to be born prematurely and to have medical and social complications. The risk of death is more than five times greater for MB infants as compared to singletons. Mothers of multiples also have an increased risk for complications during pregnancy and birth. Thus, a growing number of MB infants and families are at significant risk for experiencing myriad negative health consequences and present an important public health concern. Purpose: The purpose of this in-progress, retrospective study is to explore and describe the experiences and context of high-risk MB families. Specific aims of this study are to (a) describe the experience of high-risk twin, triplet, and higher order multiple (HOM) pregnancy and parenting in the NICU from the perspective of parents who have experienced the phenomenon; and (b) collect background data and participant recommendations for planning longitudinal, prospective, intervention studies of high-risk twin, triplet and HOM pregnancy and parenting in the NICU. Rationale: Knowledge about high-risk pregnancy, perinatal loss, and parenting critically ill or preterm infants has been primarily gained from research with families of singleton infants and applied to MB infants and families. The rising number of MB infants and the associated increased risk of significant morbidity or mortality have led to a pressing need for research with these families. Specifically, understanding how families perceive and manage the many actual and potential health risks associated with MB is crucial to the development of evidenced-based nursing interventions for this rapidly growing group. Method: This in-progress, qualitative descriptive study used semi-structured interviews and sociodemographic and biomedical questionnaires to collect data about high-risk MB families' experiences. Interviews were conducted 1 to 5 years after birth. A final sample of 12 -15 families (12 - 30 individual parents) is projected. To date, a subsample of 8 individuals (5 mothers and 3 fathers representing 5 families) have participated. Parents were married, English-speaking, white, and had completed college or trade school. Four families had twins; one family had a triplet pregnancy that was reduced to twins. Results: Each family had preterm, emergent births that were traumatizing. Only one mother delivered vaginally. All babies were live born between 27 and 32 weeks gestation; one baby died during the neonatal period. Families felt unprepared for the birth that they actually experienced. Families perceived the NICU environment as extremely stressful and often, overwhelming. Though parents were grateful for their infants' positive outcomes, poor outcomes, unforeseen complications and death were highly distressing. Feelings of loss regarding preterm birth, emergent delivery, and uncertainty about the babies' future exacerbated families' stress. Although families were grateful for the sensitive and high-caliber care that they received by most health professionals, insensitive treatment left them feeling frustrated, impotent and angry. Families learned to advocate for their family during their time in the NICU and began to grow into parenthood. Implications: Multiple birth families have unique experiences and diverse courses of birth and subsequent acute NICU hospitalization of their infants and individualized nursing care is needed. Ongoing data collection with additional families will explore the themes that have arisen with the first 5 families and findings will be reported.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMultiple Birth Parents' Birth and NICU Stressors and Experiencesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157959-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Multiple Birth Parents' Birth and NICU Stressors and Experiences</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Lutz, Kristin, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Oregon Health &amp; Science University School of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Postdoctoral Fellow</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">lutzk@ohsu.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The incidence of multiple births has risen 65% for twins and 404% for triplets and higher order multiples since 1980. Multiple birth (MB) infants are more likely to be born prematurely and to have medical and social complications. The risk of death is more than five times greater for MB infants as compared to singletons. Mothers of multiples also have an increased risk for complications during pregnancy and birth. Thus, a growing number of MB infants and families are at significant risk for experiencing myriad negative health consequences and present an important public health concern. Purpose: The purpose of this in-progress, retrospective study is to explore and describe the experiences and context of high-risk MB families. Specific aims of this study are to (a) describe the experience of high-risk twin, triplet, and higher order multiple (HOM) pregnancy and parenting in the NICU from the perspective of parents who have experienced the phenomenon; and (b) collect background data and participant recommendations for planning longitudinal, prospective, intervention studies of high-risk twin, triplet and HOM pregnancy and parenting in the NICU. Rationale: Knowledge about high-risk pregnancy, perinatal loss, and parenting critically ill or preterm infants has been primarily gained from research with families of singleton infants and applied to MB infants and families. The rising number of MB infants and the associated increased risk of significant morbidity or mortality have led to a pressing need for research with these families. Specifically, understanding how families perceive and manage the many actual and potential health risks associated with MB is crucial to the development of evidenced-based nursing interventions for this rapidly growing group. Method: This in-progress, qualitative descriptive study used semi-structured interviews and sociodemographic and biomedical questionnaires to collect data about high-risk MB families' experiences. Interviews were conducted 1 to 5 years after birth. A final sample of 12 -15 families (12 - 30 individual parents) is projected. To date, a subsample of 8 individuals (5 mothers and 3 fathers representing 5 families) have participated. Parents were married, English-speaking, white, and had completed college or trade school. Four families had twins; one family had a triplet pregnancy that was reduced to twins. Results: Each family had preterm, emergent births that were traumatizing. Only one mother delivered vaginally. All babies were live born between 27 and 32 weeks gestation; one baby died during the neonatal period. Families felt unprepared for the birth that they actually experienced. Families perceived the NICU environment as extremely stressful and often, overwhelming. Though parents were grateful for their infants' positive outcomes, poor outcomes, unforeseen complications and death were highly distressing. Feelings of loss regarding preterm birth, emergent delivery, and uncertainty about the babies' future exacerbated families' stress. Although families were grateful for the sensitive and high-caliber care that they received by most health professionals, insensitive treatment left them feeling frustrated, impotent and angry. Families learned to advocate for their family during their time in the NICU and began to grow into parenthood. Implications: Multiple birth families have unique experiences and diverse courses of birth and subsequent acute NICU hospitalization of their infants and individualized nursing care is needed. Ongoing data collection with additional families will explore the themes that have arisen with the first 5 families and findings will be reported.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:22:15Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:22:15Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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