2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157960
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Snapshots Reflecting the Lives of Siblings of Children with Autism
Abstract:
Snapshots Reflecting the Lives of Siblings of Children with Autism
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2005
Author:Mandleco, Barbara, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Brigham Young University College of Nursing
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:474 SWKT, Provo, UT, 84602-5438, USA
Contact Telephone:801-422-7199
Co-Authors:Susanne Olsen, Tina Dyches, Aimee Latta, Tammy Rampton, Jessica Roseman
Background: In the past, extensive research has focused on the effects within the family of raising a child with a disability. However, most research examines parents' perspectives rather than siblings' perspectives of their experiences. Purpose: To use photography as a method of capturing experiences and important symbols in the lives of siblings living with a child with autism. Methods: Following approval from appropriate institutional review boards and after obtaining informed consent/assent, seventeen school aged siblings of children with autism were given disposable cameras with twenty-four exposures, and asked to take photographs within a two week time period of their experiences with the child with autism and what was important to them. After the snapshots were developed, trained research assistants met individually with each sibling to listen, record, and then transcribe the stories about the photographs. Themes and categories were identified through a process of content analysis using open, axial, and selective coding. Results: Analysis revealed the photographs could be grouped into two major categories: people/non people. People (n = 227) consisted of family (n = 202; other siblings, child with autism, parents, extended family, self, family group) and friends (n = 25); non people (n = 163) consisted of objects (n = 111), animals (n = 33; domestic, non-domestic) and buildings (n = 19; house, church, school). The most frequently photographed family members were other siblings (n = 65), followed by photographs of the child with autism (n = 48). The most frequently photographed sub-category in the non people category were objects (n = 111). Secondary analysis revealed differences according to the age and gender of the sibling who took the photographs. For example, the 10-12 year olds took four times more photographs of the child with autism than the 7-9 year olds. The 13-16 year olds took no pictures of the child with autism. Female siblings took a fifth (20.41%) more photographs containing people than male siblings. On the other hand, male siblings took a fifth (20.41%) more photographs not containing people than female siblings. Stories about the photographs reflected experiences the sibling had with the people/non people in the snapshots and their normal everyday activities. Most photographs revealed family life and typical activities any sibling would experience whether or not they lived in a family raising a child with autism. Results validate the importance of gathering data in an open-ended manner directly from children, and confirm the use of photography as a method of facilitating communication with young people. Implications: Photographs can facilitate communication between children, caregivers, and health care professionals, and provide a different perception of living with a child with autism from the perspective of siblings. This information contributes to our knowledge base and allows development of specific intervention plans for siblings of children with autism.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSnapshots Reflecting the Lives of Siblings of Children with Autismen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157960-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Snapshots Reflecting the Lives of Siblings of Children with Autism</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Mandleco, Barbara, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Brigham Young University College of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">474 SWKT, Provo, UT, 84602-5438, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">801-422-7199</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">barbara_mandleco@byu.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Susanne Olsen, Tina Dyches, Aimee Latta, Tammy Rampton, Jessica Roseman</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Background: In the past, extensive research has focused on the effects within the family of raising a child with a disability. However, most research examines parents' perspectives rather than siblings' perspectives of their experiences. Purpose: To use photography as a method of capturing experiences and important symbols in the lives of siblings living with a child with autism. Methods: Following approval from appropriate institutional review boards and after obtaining informed consent/assent, seventeen school aged siblings of children with autism were given disposable cameras with twenty-four exposures, and asked to take photographs within a two week time period of their experiences with the child with autism and what was important to them. After the snapshots were developed, trained research assistants met individually with each sibling to listen, record, and then transcribe the stories about the photographs. Themes and categories were identified through a process of content analysis using open, axial, and selective coding. Results: Analysis revealed the photographs could be grouped into two major categories: people/non people. People (n = 227) consisted of family (n = 202; other siblings, child with autism, parents, extended family, self, family group) and friends (n = 25); non people (n = 163) consisted of objects (n = 111), animals (n = 33; domestic, non-domestic) and buildings (n = 19; house, church, school). The most frequently photographed family members were other siblings (n = 65), followed by photographs of the child with autism (n = 48). The most frequently photographed sub-category in the non people category were objects (n = 111). Secondary analysis revealed differences according to the age and gender of the sibling who took the photographs. For example, the 10-12 year olds took four times more photographs of the child with autism than the 7-9 year olds. The 13-16 year olds took no pictures of the child with autism. Female siblings took a fifth (20.41%) more photographs containing people than male siblings. On the other hand, male siblings took a fifth (20.41%) more photographs not containing people than female siblings. Stories about the photographs reflected experiences the sibling had with the people/non people in the snapshots and their normal everyday activities. Most photographs revealed family life and typical activities any sibling would experience whether or not they lived in a family raising a child with autism. Results validate the importance of gathering data in an open-ended manner directly from children, and confirm the use of photography as a method of facilitating communication with young people. Implications: Photographs can facilitate communication between children, caregivers, and health care professionals, and provide a different perception of living with a child with autism from the perspective of siblings. This information contributes to our knowledge base and allows development of specific intervention plans for siblings of children with autism.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:22:19Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:22:19Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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