Accounting for Treatment Preference: Exploration of Methods: A Procedure for Eliciting Preference for Treatment

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157967
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Accounting for Treatment Preference: Exploration of Methods: A Procedure for Eliciting Preference for Treatment
Abstract:
Accounting for Treatment Preference: Exploration of Methods: A Procedure for Eliciting Preference for Treatment
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2005
Author:Miranda, Joyal, RN, BScN, MN, PhD(c)
P.I. Institution Name:University of Toronto Faculty of Nursing
Title:Doctoral Student
Contact Address:50 St. George Street, Toronto, ON, M5S 3H4, Canada
Contact Telephone:416-946-8183
With the realization of the advantages of accounting for participant treatment preferences, investigators attempted to quantify these preferences in intervention evaluation research. Although the procedure for quantifying treatment preference is not clearly and explicitly described, the studies' published reports suggest that the procedure often consists of a simple step of asking which of the two treatment options offered in the study participants prefer. This procedure is simplistic and is not congruent with the definition of patient preference. Patient preference is the expression of a value for alternative options for action after informed deliberation of their risks and benefits. This statement implies that the participants should be given adequate and relevant information about the treatment options prior to eliciting their preferences. In this paper, we describe a systematic procedure for inquiring about the participants' preference for treatment options in an intervention evaluation study, and we report on our experience in applying it. The systematic procedure consists of providing a description of each treatment option, having the participants rate each treatment option, and requesting the participants to indicate which of the two treatment options they would like to receive. The description of the treatment options is based on available literature; it identifies the name of the treatment and the essential activities comprising the treatment. A summary of the treatment effectiveness, risks and benefits, and dose is also presented. After reading the description, participants are to evaluate the treatment in terms of its suitability, acceptability, and effectiveness. Once both treatment options are rated, the participants indicate which they prefer. To date, this systematic procedure was followed to elicit the treatment preference of 100 participants. The researcher read the treatment descriptions and the questions to evaluate the treatment, and recorded the participants' responses. In addition, the researcher documented unsolicited verbal comments made by the participants throughout the procedure. The majority of the participants had no difficulty completing the task and had a clear preference for one treatment option. Suitability of the treatment to their presenting problem and to their lifestyle appears a factor that participants consider when selecting a treatment option. Other factors included knowledge of and familiarity with the treatment, as well as their ability to adhere to it. A large number of participants expressed that eliciting and accounting for their treatment of preference enhanced their "sense of control", which is an important theme underlying patient-centered care.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAccounting for Treatment Preference: Exploration of Methods: A Procedure for Eliciting Preference for Treatmenten_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157967-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Accounting for Treatment Preference: Exploration of Methods: A Procedure for Eliciting Preference for Treatment</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Miranda, Joyal, RN, BScN, MN, PhD(c)</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Toronto Faculty of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Doctoral Student</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">50 St. George Street, Toronto, ON, M5S 3H4, Canada</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">416-946-8183</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">joyal.miranda@utoronto.ca</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">With the realization of the advantages of accounting for participant treatment preferences, investigators attempted to quantify these preferences in intervention evaluation research. Although the procedure for quantifying treatment preference is not clearly and explicitly described, the studies' published reports suggest that the procedure often consists of a simple step of asking which of the two treatment options offered in the study participants prefer. This procedure is simplistic and is not congruent with the definition of patient preference. Patient preference is the expression of a value for alternative options for action after informed deliberation of their risks and benefits. This statement implies that the participants should be given adequate and relevant information about the treatment options prior to eliciting their preferences. In this paper, we describe a systematic procedure for inquiring about the participants' preference for treatment options in an intervention evaluation study, and we report on our experience in applying it. The systematic procedure consists of providing a description of each treatment option, having the participants rate each treatment option, and requesting the participants to indicate which of the two treatment options they would like to receive. The description of the treatment options is based on available literature; it identifies the name of the treatment and the essential activities comprising the treatment. A summary of the treatment effectiveness, risks and benefits, and dose is also presented. After reading the description, participants are to evaluate the treatment in terms of its suitability, acceptability, and effectiveness. Once both treatment options are rated, the participants indicate which they prefer. To date, this systematic procedure was followed to elicit the treatment preference of 100 participants. The researcher read the treatment descriptions and the questions to evaluate the treatment, and recorded the participants' responses. In addition, the researcher documented unsolicited verbal comments made by the participants throughout the procedure. The majority of the participants had no difficulty completing the task and had a clear preference for one treatment option. Suitability of the treatment to their presenting problem and to their lifestyle appears a factor that participants consider when selecting a treatment option. Other factors included knowledge of and familiarity with the treatment, as well as their ability to adhere to it. A large number of participants expressed that eliciting and accounting for their treatment of preference enhanced their &quot;sense of control&quot;, which is an important theme underlying patient-centered care.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:22:43Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:22:43Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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