Building Knowledge About the Menopausal Transition: The SMWHS Project: Overview

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157968
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Building Knowledge About the Menopausal Transition: The SMWHS Project: Overview
Abstract:
Building Knowledge About the Menopausal Transition: The SMWHS Project: Overview
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2005
Author:Mitchell, Ellen, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Washington School of Nursing
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:Box 357262, Seattle, WA, 98195-7262, USA
Contact Telephone:206-616-4938
Co-Authors:Nancy E. Woods, Kathleen Smith-DiJulio
Background: Many different symptoms are attributed to menstrual cycle changes that occur during the menopausal transition (MT) and the postmenopause (PM). Some claim the "change" is responsible for emotional symptoms, muscle and joint symptoms, insomnia, as well as vasomotor symptoms. Purposes: The two purposes of this study were 1) to describe the reliability and stability of 5 symptom clusters in a group of women during MT and PM and 2) to determine if the stage of MT made a difference in symptom severity level for each cluster. Methods: The sample included all women not on hormones who were classified as either Early, Middle or Late stage of MT or PM in 1994 (n=70), 1997 (n=76) and 2000 (n=81). This study was part of a longitudinal study about MT, ongoing since 1990. Stage of MT was determined using staging criteria developed by the investigators and applied to menstrual calendars. Symptom scores were from health diaries collected for 3-5 days during the early follicular phase. Reliability and stability of 5 symptom clusters (emotional, vasomotor, somatic, discomfort, insomnia) across 6 years was calculated using the Heise method. ANOVA was done to test for MT stage and PM differences for each of the 5 symptom clusters for 1997 (n=126). Results: All symptom clusters, except discomfort, had a reliability coefficient above 0.7 when corrected for expected changes over time. Discomfort had a 0.63 coefficient. The corrected reliability coefficient was higher than the zero-order coefficient for all clusters when comparing 1994 with 2000 and 1994 with 1997 indicating a consistency of reporting over these time spans. This indicates less effect of time on consistency of symptom reporting across time. When stability was calculated, the highest stability was for emotional, somatic, discomfort and insomnia symptoms from 1997 to 2000. Vasomotor symptoms had the lowest stability from 1994 to 2000 with only 2.1% of the variance in 1994 shared with 2000. The other 4 clusters had 43.7% to 53.7% variance shared between this 6 year time span. Using ANOVA, the vasomotor (p = <.001) and discomfort (p = .047) clusters had MT stage differences. For vasomotor symptoms, Late stage and PM had higher levels than Early and Middle stages. For discomfort symptoms, PM had a severity level lower than Middle or Late stages. Implications: A moderate to high stability in symptom severity across 6 years may be attributed to chronic health problems rather than to MT changes in the menstrual cycle. Women are aging, as well as experiencing menstrual and hormone changes during this time. If these symptoms were driven by hormonal changes associated with MT and PM or by aging it seems there would be more instability in the symptoms across time. On the other hand, the one cluster with the least stability, vasomotor, is the one most supported by the literature as related to hormonal changes during MT and PM. This was supported in this study with higher levels of vasomotor symptoms during the Late stage and PM. Understanding the symptom experiences of women in MT and PM is important when counseling women during this time of their life and when making decisions about treating symptoms.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleBuilding Knowledge About the Menopausal Transition: The SMWHS Project: Overviewen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157968-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Building Knowledge About the Menopausal Transition: The SMWHS Project: Overview</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Mitchell, Ellen, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Washington School of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Box 357262, Seattle, WA, 98195-7262, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">206-616-4938</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">nellem@u.washington.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Nancy E. Woods, Kathleen Smith-DiJulio</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Background: Many different symptoms are attributed to menstrual cycle changes that occur during the menopausal transition (MT) and the postmenopause (PM). Some claim the &quot;change&quot; is responsible for emotional symptoms, muscle and joint symptoms, insomnia, as well as vasomotor symptoms. Purposes: The two purposes of this study were 1) to describe the reliability and stability of 5 symptom clusters in a group of women during MT and PM and 2) to determine if the stage of MT made a difference in symptom severity level for each cluster. Methods: The sample included all women not on hormones who were classified as either Early, Middle or Late stage of MT or PM in 1994 (n=70), 1997 (n=76) and 2000 (n=81). This study was part of a longitudinal study about MT, ongoing since 1990. Stage of MT was determined using staging criteria developed by the investigators and applied to menstrual calendars. Symptom scores were from health diaries collected for 3-5 days during the early follicular phase. Reliability and stability of 5 symptom clusters (emotional, vasomotor, somatic, discomfort, insomnia) across 6 years was calculated using the Heise method. ANOVA was done to test for MT stage and PM differences for each of the 5 symptom clusters for 1997 (n=126). Results: All symptom clusters, except discomfort, had a reliability coefficient above 0.7 when corrected for expected changes over time. Discomfort had a 0.63 coefficient. The corrected reliability coefficient was higher than the zero-order coefficient for all clusters when comparing 1994 with 2000 and 1994 with 1997 indicating a consistency of reporting over these time spans. This indicates less effect of time on consistency of symptom reporting across time. When stability was calculated, the highest stability was for emotional, somatic, discomfort and insomnia symptoms from 1997 to 2000. Vasomotor symptoms had the lowest stability from 1994 to 2000 with only 2.1% of the variance in 1994 shared with 2000. The other 4 clusters had 43.7% to 53.7% variance shared between this 6 year time span. Using ANOVA, the vasomotor (p = &lt;.001) and discomfort (p = .047) clusters had MT stage differences. For vasomotor symptoms, Late stage and PM had higher levels than Early and Middle stages. For discomfort symptoms, PM had a severity level lower than Middle or Late stages. Implications: A moderate to high stability in symptom severity across 6 years may be attributed to chronic health problems rather than to MT changes in the menstrual cycle. Women are aging, as well as experiencing menstrual and hormone changes during this time. If these symptoms were driven by hormonal changes associated with MT and PM or by aging it seems there would be more instability in the symptoms across time. On the other hand, the one cluster with the least stability, vasomotor, is the one most supported by the literature as related to hormonal changes during MT and PM. This was supported in this study with higher levels of vasomotor symptoms during the Late stage and PM. Understanding the symptom experiences of women in MT and PM is important when counseling women during this time of their life and when making decisions about treating symptoms.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:22:47Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:22:47Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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