Accounting for Treatment Preference: Exploration of Methods: Client Preference Incorporated into a Community-Based Intervention

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157969
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Accounting for Treatment Preference: Exploration of Methods: Client Preference Incorporated into a Community-Based Intervention
Abstract:
Accounting for Treatment Preference: Exploration of Methods: Client Preference Incorporated into a Community-Based Intervention
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2005
Author:Moritz, Patricia, RN, PhD, FAAN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Colorado at Denver/HSC School of Nursing
Title:Dean
Contact Address:Box C-288-1, 4200 East Ninth Avenue, Denver, CO, 80262, USA
Contact Telephone:303-315-3008
Co-Authors:Ruth O'Brien
Patient-centered care has long been a hallmark of nursing practice and that of other disciplines in the behavioral and social sciences. Incorporating this approach into a community-public health intervention program can be challenging from the perspective of reliability and appropriateness for the intervention design. An important question that has been asked when client preference is incorporated is: How does one know that the intervention has been implemented as planned and what are the outcome indicators that can be used to determine this? In a large-scale longitudinal evaluation study of the implementation of the Nurse Family Partnership program in community public health agencies in multiple states, the issue of interveners' fidelity to the practice guidelines has been examined through both quantitative and qualitative approaches. Quantitative process data show that nurses at different sites implementing the NFP program vary in their documentation of incorporation of the domains of the intervention, with nurses within a given site tending to spend somewhat similar amounts of time on the domains. Outcome data, which were expected to be influenced by the extent that the program is tailored to the preferences of clients, focused on indicators of retention. Quantitative data showed some unexplained and inconsistent results when factors associated with the client, intervener, and setting were incorporated into analytic models. Because of this a qualitative retention study was initiated to better understand factors from the interveners' perspective that influence client retention. An important finding of this analysis showed that interveners with high attrition of clients had associated beliefs and self-described actions carried in practice that were not present among those interveners who had low attrition. These beliefs and actions were interpreted as interfering with the interveners' ability to recognize client preferences, assess family needs, and meet practice guideline standards.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAccounting for Treatment Preference: Exploration of Methods: Client Preference Incorporated into a Community-Based Interventionen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157969-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Accounting for Treatment Preference: Exploration of Methods: Client Preference Incorporated into a Community-Based Intervention</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Moritz, Patricia, RN, PhD, FAAN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Colorado at Denver/HSC School of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Dean</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Box C-288-1, 4200 East Ninth Avenue, Denver, CO, 80262, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">303-315-3008</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">pat.moritz@uchsc.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Ruth O'Brien</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Patient-centered care has long been a hallmark of nursing practice and that of other disciplines in the behavioral and social sciences. Incorporating this approach into a community-public health intervention program can be challenging from the perspective of reliability and appropriateness for the intervention design. An important question that has been asked when client preference is incorporated is: How does one know that the intervention has been implemented as planned and what are the outcome indicators that can be used to determine this? In a large-scale longitudinal evaluation study of the implementation of the Nurse Family Partnership program in community public health agencies in multiple states, the issue of interveners' fidelity to the practice guidelines has been examined through both quantitative and qualitative approaches. Quantitative process data show that nurses at different sites implementing the NFP program vary in their documentation of incorporation of the domains of the intervention, with nurses within a given site tending to spend somewhat similar amounts of time on the domains. Outcome data, which were expected to be influenced by the extent that the program is tailored to the preferences of clients, focused on indicators of retention. Quantitative data showed some unexplained and inconsistent results when factors associated with the client, intervener, and setting were incorporated into analytic models. Because of this a qualitative retention study was initiated to better understand factors from the interveners' perspective that influence client retention. An important finding of this analysis showed that interveners with high attrition of clients had associated beliefs and self-described actions carried in practice that were not present among those interveners who had low attrition. These beliefs and actions were interpreted as interfering with the interveners' ability to recognize client preferences, assess family needs, and meet practice guideline standards.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:22:50Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:22:50Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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