2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157970
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Caring for Latinos: Nurses' Concerns and Practices with Using Interpreters
Abstract:
Caring for Latinos: Nurses' Concerns and Practices with Using Interpreters
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2005
Author:Nailon, Regina, RN, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Pensylvania
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:317R Nursing Education Bldg, 420 Guardian Drive, Philadelphia, PA, 19104-6096, USA
Contact Telephone:215-746-2954
Purposes/Aims: Efforts to improve minority health emphasize culturally congruent care. The patient encounter is dependent upon accuracy in communication, and linguistic differences challenge nurses' abilities to establish meaningful connections through which culturally congruent and effective care can be provided. The purpose of this phenomenological study was to examine nursing care of Latino patients in the emergency department to uncover contextually embedded concerns and practices that guide nurses' care relative to the patient's ethnicity, including the patient's linguistic abilities. Rationale/Conceptual basis/Background: A lack of insurance and of regular providers lead many non-English speaking (NES) Latinos to access emergency departments for primary care. In 2000, there were 32.8 million Latinos in the United States; approximately 79% of these individuals spoke a language other than English at home. Of those who spoke Spanish at home, about 19% indicated they did not speak English well and about 11% indicated they did not speak English at all. Nurses and NES Latino patients must have access to accurate communication through which concerns and information can be conveyed that fully address needs brought to clinical encounters. Examining nurses' experiences in the care of NES Latino patients reveals enhancers and barriers to nurses' abilities to provide culturally congruent care when that care is mediated by an interpreter. Methods: Fifteen registered nurses from four hospitals located in urban and rural settings in a northwestern state participated in this study. Group and individual interviews enabled nurses to describe significant experiences they had in caring for NES Latino patients. Observations of selected nurses' practices enabled descriptions of the everyday, often taken-for-granted context within which care occurred, including the environment and resources used by nurses. The investigator conducted, audio-recorded, and transcribed all nurse interviews. Data were analyzed through an iterative process of thematic analysis. Trustworthiness of data analysis was established through prolonged engagement, persistent observation, triangulation, peer debriefing, thick descriptions, and reflective journaling. Results: Nurses' narratives highlighted the importance of providing care that was planned appropriately and according to the patient's presentation, and nurses recognized the pivotal role that interpreters held in their nursing practice. Nurses varied in ability and comfort when working with interpreters, which, in turn, influenced the nurse's ability to establish and maintain meaningful connections with NES patients. In addition to nurses' skills and abilities, facets of nurses' work environments enhanced or impeded communication and meaningful connections with NES patients when care was mediated by interpreters. These included interpreter availability, stance, emotional engagement, and accuracy. Implications: A lack of interpreters and skill in working with interpreters impairs nurses' abilities to gather valuable and applicable clinical and cultural information. Health care systems must foster environments that promote culturally congruent care. To this end, nurses must be provided with adequate resources, and nurses and interpreters must receive necessary training and education to prepare them to work effectively with each other so that meaningful connections with NES Latino patients and families can be established and sustained throughout the care encounter.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCaring for Latinos: Nurses' Concerns and Practices with Using Interpretersen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157970-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Caring for Latinos: Nurses' Concerns and Practices with Using Interpreters</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Nailon, Regina, RN, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Pensylvania</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">317R Nursing Education Bldg, 420 Guardian Drive, Philadelphia, PA, 19104-6096, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">215-746-2954</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">rrnailon@nursing.upenn.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purposes/Aims: Efforts to improve minority health emphasize culturally congruent care. The patient encounter is dependent upon accuracy in communication, and linguistic differences challenge nurses' abilities to establish meaningful connections through which culturally congruent and effective care can be provided. The purpose of this phenomenological study was to examine nursing care of Latino patients in the emergency department to uncover contextually embedded concerns and practices that guide nurses' care relative to the patient's ethnicity, including the patient's linguistic abilities. Rationale/Conceptual basis/Background: A lack of insurance and of regular providers lead many non-English speaking (NES) Latinos to access emergency departments for primary care. In 2000, there were 32.8 million Latinos in the United States; approximately 79% of these individuals spoke a language other than English at home. Of those who spoke Spanish at home, about 19% indicated they did not speak English well and about 11% indicated they did not speak English at all. Nurses and NES Latino patients must have access to accurate communication through which concerns and information can be conveyed that fully address needs brought to clinical encounters. Examining nurses' experiences in the care of NES Latino patients reveals enhancers and barriers to nurses' abilities to provide culturally congruent care when that care is mediated by an interpreter. Methods: Fifteen registered nurses from four hospitals located in urban and rural settings in a northwestern state participated in this study. Group and individual interviews enabled nurses to describe significant experiences they had in caring for NES Latino patients. Observations of selected nurses' practices enabled descriptions of the everyday, often taken-for-granted context within which care occurred, including the environment and resources used by nurses. The investigator conducted, audio-recorded, and transcribed all nurse interviews. Data were analyzed through an iterative process of thematic analysis. Trustworthiness of data analysis was established through prolonged engagement, persistent observation, triangulation, peer debriefing, thick descriptions, and reflective journaling. Results: Nurses' narratives highlighted the importance of providing care that was planned appropriately and according to the patient's presentation, and nurses recognized the pivotal role that interpreters held in their nursing practice. Nurses varied in ability and comfort when working with interpreters, which, in turn, influenced the nurse's ability to establish and maintain meaningful connections with NES patients. In addition to nurses' skills and abilities, facets of nurses' work environments enhanced or impeded communication and meaningful connections with NES patients when care was mediated by interpreters. These included interpreter availability, stance, emotional engagement, and accuracy. Implications: A lack of interpreters and skill in working with interpreters impairs nurses' abilities to gather valuable and applicable clinical and cultural information. Health care systems must foster environments that promote culturally congruent care. To this end, nurses must be provided with adequate resources, and nurses and interpreters must receive necessary training and education to prepare them to work effectively with each other so that meaningful connections with NES Latino patients and families can be established and sustained throughout the care encounter.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:22:54Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:22:54Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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