Supporting Self-Determination: Perspectives of Older Adults & Providers: Articulating Older Adult's Perceptions of Self Determination Support

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157971
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Supporting Self-Determination: Perspectives of Older Adults & Providers: Articulating Older Adult's Perceptions of Self Determination Support
Abstract:
Supporting Self-Determination: Perspectives of Older Adults & Providers: Articulating Older Adult's Perceptions of Self Determination Support
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2005
Author:Olsen, Pat, MN, RN
P.I. Institution Name:King County Northshore Senior Center
Title:Clinical Coordinator
Contact Address:10201 E Riverside Drive, Bothell, WA, 98011-8246, USA
Contact Telephone:425-486-4564
Purpose/Aims: The purpose of this project was to give voice to the perceptions of participants regarding clinical competencies that support the self-determination (autonomy, relatedness, competence) of older adults participating in a community-based health promotion program. Specific aims included: 1. describing the methods of the health promotion intervention used by the clinicians implementing the program; 2. describing the nature and aspects of the clinician-participant relationship that supported older adults in determining, pursuing, and accomplishing their self-determined health goals; and 3. describing clinician competencies that supported autonomy, competence, and relatedness in accomplishing self-determined health promotion and chronic disease self-management goals. Conceptual Basis and Background: The Health Enhancement Program (HEP) began as a randomized controlled trial in mid-1990's at a local senior center. HEP was designed to identify potentially modifiable risk factors for disability and promote healthy behavior change to reverse those risk factors while improving self-management of chronic illness in older adults (Leveille et al., 1998). The original HEP results showed that treatment subjects decreased hospitalizations by 38% while control subjects increased hospitalizations by 68%. The number of hospital days decreased by 72% in the intervention group with a 20% increase in the control group and intervention group participants met with the GNP a median of three times during the study year. The Health Enhancement Program's original findings suggest that a senior center-based approach to disability prevention and chronic disease self-management was effective in reducing major disability and hospitalizations in chronically ill older adults. Dissemination results show that HEP has proven to reduce functional decline, increase physical activity and socialization and decrease levels of depression in participants through the use of multi-disciplinary approaches to health behavior change (Phelan et al., 2002). For the purposes of participant evaluation, the Health Enhancement Program has elicited participant yes/no satisfaction scores in only 20% of 304 dissemination participants. Of those participants, 85% reported they had been helped to make lasting health behavior changes. This project exposes how participants were supported in the clinician-participant health promotion interaction of the Health Enhancement Program. Method: Qualitative analysis of interview transcripts with sixteen older adult participants using grounded theory methodology. Results: Participants identified therapeutic interventions including: listening, caring, encouraging, guiding and connecting. The general intervention connecting was further described by participants as connecting with staff, other individuals, groups and resources. These interventions were then linked to Self-Determination Theory, describing how they support participants' autonomy, relatedness and competence in the second paper of this symposium. Conclusions: These findings describe competencies that support participant autonomy (choice), competence (confidence) and relatedness (caring and connecting) in determining, pursuing and accomplishing participant's self-determined health promotion and self-management goals.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSupporting Self-Determination: Perspectives of Older Adults & Providers: Articulating Older Adult's Perceptions of Self Determination Supporten_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157971-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Supporting Self-Determination: Perspectives of Older Adults &amp; Providers: Articulating Older Adult's Perceptions of Self Determination Support</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Olsen, Pat, MN, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">King County Northshore Senior Center</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Clinical Coordinator</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">10201 E Riverside Drive, Bothell, WA, 98011-8246, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">425-486-4564</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">pato@seniorservices.org</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose/Aims: The purpose of this project was to give voice to the perceptions of participants regarding clinical competencies that support the self-determination (autonomy, relatedness, competence) of older adults participating in a community-based health promotion program. Specific aims included: 1. describing the methods of the health promotion intervention used by the clinicians implementing the program; 2. describing the nature and aspects of the clinician-participant relationship that supported older adults in determining, pursuing, and accomplishing their self-determined health goals; and 3. describing clinician competencies that supported autonomy, competence, and relatedness in accomplishing self-determined health promotion and chronic disease self-management goals. Conceptual Basis and Background: The Health Enhancement Program (HEP) began as a randomized controlled trial in mid-1990's at a local senior center. HEP was designed to identify potentially modifiable risk factors for disability and promote healthy behavior change to reverse those risk factors while improving self-management of chronic illness in older adults (Leveille et al., 1998). The original HEP results showed that treatment subjects decreased hospitalizations by 38% while control subjects increased hospitalizations by 68%. The number of hospital days decreased by 72% in the intervention group with a 20% increase in the control group and intervention group participants met with the GNP a median of three times during the study year. The Health Enhancement Program's original findings suggest that a senior center-based approach to disability prevention and chronic disease self-management was effective in reducing major disability and hospitalizations in chronically ill older adults. Dissemination results show that HEP has proven to reduce functional decline, increase physical activity and socialization and decrease levels of depression in participants through the use of multi-disciplinary approaches to health behavior change (Phelan et al., 2002). For the purposes of participant evaluation, the Health Enhancement Program has elicited participant yes/no satisfaction scores in only 20% of 304 dissemination participants. Of those participants, 85% reported they had been helped to make lasting health behavior changes. This project exposes how participants were supported in the clinician-participant health promotion interaction of the Health Enhancement Program. Method: Qualitative analysis of interview transcripts with sixteen older adult participants using grounded theory methodology. Results: Participants identified therapeutic interventions including: listening, caring, encouraging, guiding and connecting. The general intervention connecting was further described by participants as connecting with staff, other individuals, groups and resources. These interventions were then linked to Self-Determination Theory, describing how they support participants' autonomy, relatedness and competence in the second paper of this symposium. Conclusions: These findings describe competencies that support participant autonomy (choice), competence (confidence) and relatedness (caring and connecting) in determining, pursuing and accomplishing participant's self-determined health promotion and self-management goals.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:22:57Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:22:57Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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