2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157972
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Evidence-Based Practice and Information Literacy Skills in Rural Nurses
Abstract:
Evidence-Based Practice and Information Literacy Skills in Rural Nurses
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2005
Author:Ouzts, Karen, RN, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Wyoming Fay Whitney School of Nursing
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:Dept 3065, 1000 E University Ave, Laramie, WY, 82071, USA
Contact Telephone:307-766-6575
Background: Evidence-based practice (EBP) has increasingly become an expected standard for health care professionals. In order to promote EBP in an electronic age, nurses need strong health information literacy skills. This pilot study sought to determine the degree of access to information and the health information literacy skills of nurses in rural practice. Sample: A convenience sample of nurses who practice in acute care and public health was drawn from two diverse Wyoming communities. The larger town (population 18,400) was located in a county with resources that include a community college and a hospital large enough to employ a medical librarian. The second town (population 3,400) was located in a county with considerably fewer resources. Methods: A 30 item survey was developed and administered to determine access to information and to obtain information about the level of health information literacy (HIL) skills of nurses. The survey was developed with input from a university-based medical librarian, a hospital-based medical librarian, and a Nation Networks of Library of Medicine (NN/LM) liaison librarian. In addition to the survey, the NN/LM liaison conducted a community assessment of information resources in order to get a complete picture of information resources in each town. Results: Preliminary analyses of the results are alarming. 90% of the nurses surveyed do not have access to evidence-based information at the point of care and indicated a colleague as the first place they go for information. Most have limited access to clinical journals and research articles from peer reviewed journals are not available unless nurses are willing to personally pay for them. Nurses' second source of information is the internet via search engines such as Google. Both communities do have a public library, but access to health related bibliographic databases or full text articles is not available. Other barriers to evidence based practice were also identified. Implications: Results of this study suggest that nurses and other health care providers have low levels of information literacy skills as well as very limited access to current research necessary to inform their practice. Additional research is necessary to determine the scope of this problem in both rural and more urban settings.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEvidence-Based Practice and Information Literacy Skills in Rural Nursesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157972-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Evidence-Based Practice and Information Literacy Skills in Rural Nurses</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Ouzts, Karen, RN, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Wyoming Fay Whitney School of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Dept 3065, 1000 E University Ave, Laramie, WY, 82071, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">307-766-6575</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">kouzts@uwyo.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Background: Evidence-based practice (EBP) has increasingly become an expected standard for health care professionals. In order to promote EBP in an electronic age, nurses need strong health information literacy skills. This pilot study sought to determine the degree of access to information and the health information literacy skills of nurses in rural practice. Sample: A convenience sample of nurses who practice in acute care and public health was drawn from two diverse Wyoming communities. The larger town (population 18,400) was located in a county with resources that include a community college and a hospital large enough to employ a medical librarian. The second town (population 3,400) was located in a county with considerably fewer resources. Methods: A 30 item survey was developed and administered to determine access to information and to obtain information about the level of health information literacy (HIL) skills of nurses. The survey was developed with input from a university-based medical librarian, a hospital-based medical librarian, and a Nation Networks of Library of Medicine (NN/LM) liaison librarian. In addition to the survey, the NN/LM liaison conducted a community assessment of information resources in order to get a complete picture of information resources in each town. Results: Preliminary analyses of the results are alarming. 90% of the nurses surveyed do not have access to evidence-based information at the point of care and indicated a colleague as the first place they go for information. Most have limited access to clinical journals and research articles from peer reviewed journals are not available unless nurses are willing to personally pay for them. Nurses' second source of information is the internet via search engines such as Google. Both communities do have a public library, but access to health related bibliographic databases or full text articles is not available. Other barriers to evidence based practice were also identified. Implications: Results of this study suggest that nurses and other health care providers have low levels of information literacy skills as well as very limited access to current research necessary to inform their practice. Additional research is necessary to determine the scope of this problem in both rural and more urban settings.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:23:01Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:23:01Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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