2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157974
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Designing with Children, for Children: Computerized Activity Recall
Abstract:
Designing with Children, for Children: Computerized Activity Recall
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2005
Author:Pearce, Patricia, PhD, RN, CS-FNP/GNP
P.I. Institution Name:University of Utah College of Nursing , #543
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:10 South 2000 East, Salt Lake City, UT, 84112-5880, USA
Contact Telephone:801-585-3863
Purpose: The purpose of this study was to: (a) explore children's understanding of physical activity, (b) identify what they needed and wanted in a questionnaire for self-reported physical activity, (c) design a computer-based questionnaire for activity self-report, and (d) evaluate its usability for children. Background: Physical inactivity is linked to obesity, metabolic syndrome, and early cardiovascular risk. There are global imperatives to understand children's physical activity, but physical activity measurement is difficult, especially with self-report. The inconsistent validity of currently available physical activity questionnaires may be due the lack of attention to matching the questionnaire content and format to children's understandings of the underlying constructs, or to the form and structure that children need for precise recall. Participants: Understanding physical activity and questionnaire design was explored with 12 children in three grade-cohorted groups (11-15 years; 6th-8th grades) in 15 meetings (1.5 hours each). Eight of these children further participated in evaluating usability of the questionnaire. Additionally 10 design-nanve children evaluated the usability of the computerized questionnaire prototype. Thus, a total of 22 children participated in the study. Methods: The three-phased descriptive study was executed using a Vygotskian3 perspective couched in a Usability Engineering model.2 Collaborative, exploratory meetings were audio-recorded, and transcripts content analyzed, augmented with taxonomic analysis and concept synthesis techniques, using Atlas/ti(r) software. Interpretation was mapped to interface representation and database development, using traditional database techniques. Readability and algorithm reliability were assessed. Usability evaluation was done with 1:1 think-aloud protocol. All children reported one-day of activities using the questionnaire. Reports were analyzed with descriptive statistics. Results: The children understood physical activity at a concrete level and were adept in recalling activities and time, but had difficulty assessing intensity. Play was the most versatile and frequent (N = 332) descriptor for activity, and a deciding factor in activity choices. Parameters of engagement with questionnaires that were identified may influence the children's ability to complete commonly used physical activity questionnaires. In the usability evaluation, the children had no difficulty recalling their activities or time spent. Over the report period (6 AM-12 midnight), children averaged: 22 activity reports (sd = 4.86; range = 16-33), 15.5 hours of activity (sd = 3.4; range 6-20 hours), and 1799 MET-minutes (sd = 488; range 635-3014) (minutes of activity x MET1). Implications: A child-friendly questionnaire reduces children's work in self-reporting physical activity, while reducing the work of researchers and clinicians in assessing physical activity. A questionnaire that represents children's understandings of physical activity and needs for reporting should enhance understanding and measurement of physical activity, and will translate to more effective interventions. Psychometric data and clinical use trials will be necessary to further evaluate the computerized questionnaire.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDesigning with Children, for Children: Computerized Activity Recallen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157974-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Designing with Children, for Children: Computerized Activity Recall</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Pearce, Patricia, PhD, RN, CS-FNP/GNP</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Utah College of Nursing , #543</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">10 South 2000 East, Salt Lake City, UT, 84112-5880, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">801-585-3863</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">patricia.pearce@nurs.utah.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: The purpose of this study was to: (a) explore children's understanding of physical activity, (b) identify what they needed and wanted in a questionnaire for self-reported physical activity, (c) design a computer-based questionnaire for activity self-report, and (d) evaluate its usability for children. Background: Physical inactivity is linked to obesity, metabolic syndrome, and early cardiovascular risk. There are global imperatives to understand children's physical activity, but physical activity measurement is difficult, especially with self-report. The inconsistent validity of currently available physical activity questionnaires may be due the lack of attention to matching the questionnaire content and format to children's understandings of the underlying constructs, or to the form and structure that children need for precise recall. Participants: Understanding physical activity and questionnaire design was explored with 12 children in three grade-cohorted groups (11-15 years; 6th-8th grades) in 15 meetings (1.5 hours each). Eight of these children further participated in evaluating usability of the questionnaire. Additionally 10 design-nanve children evaluated the usability of the computerized questionnaire prototype. Thus, a total of 22 children participated in the study. Methods: The three-phased descriptive study was executed using a Vygotskian3 perspective couched in a Usability Engineering model.2 Collaborative, exploratory meetings were audio-recorded, and transcripts content analyzed, augmented with taxonomic analysis and concept synthesis techniques, using Atlas/ti(r) software. Interpretation was mapped to interface representation and database development, using traditional database techniques. Readability and algorithm reliability were assessed. Usability evaluation was done with 1:1 think-aloud protocol. All children reported one-day of activities using the questionnaire. Reports were analyzed with descriptive statistics. Results: The children understood physical activity at a concrete level and were adept in recalling activities and time, but had difficulty assessing intensity. Play was the most versatile and frequent (N = 332) descriptor for activity, and a deciding factor in activity choices. Parameters of engagement with questionnaires that were identified may influence the children's ability to complete commonly used physical activity questionnaires. In the usability evaluation, the children had no difficulty recalling their activities or time spent. Over the report period (6 AM-12 midnight), children averaged: 22 activity reports (sd = 4.86; range = 16-33), 15.5 hours of activity (sd = 3.4; range 6-20 hours), and 1799 MET-minutes (sd = 488; range 635-3014) (minutes of activity x MET1). Implications: A child-friendly questionnaire reduces children's work in self-reporting physical activity, while reducing the work of researchers and clinicians in assessing physical activity. A questionnaire that represents children's understandings of physical activity and needs for reporting should enhance understanding and measurement of physical activity, and will translate to more effective interventions. Psychometric data and clinical use trials will be necessary to further evaluate the computerized questionnaire.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:23:08Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:23:08Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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