2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157976
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Psychological Processes of Men Living with Depression
Abstract:
Psychological Processes of Men Living with Depression
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2005
Author:Ramirez, Jeff, MSN, RN, PMH-NP, ARNP
P.I. Institution Name:Eastern State Hospital
Title:PhD Student
Contact Address:PO Box 800, Medical Lake, WA, 99022, USA
Contact Telephone:509-299-7037
Purpose: The purpose of this study is to explore the phenomena of how men experience the process of depression to determine the human responses associated with the symptoms of depression, cultural influences, and their environment. Background of the Problem: Many studies have reported that women suffer from depression at higher rates than men. Some studies concluded that men are at higher risk for depression because men tend to be unidentified, under-diagnosed, and untreated for this disorder. Men with depression may be under-diagnosed because the symptoms of male depression are different than the classic symptoms health care professionals think of as depression: Men deny they have problems because society expects them to "be strong;" Men deny they have a problem with their sexuality and do not understand the relationship to depression; and the symptom clusters of male depression are not well-known so it remains unrecognized. According to the data from the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH), 18.8 million Americans suffer from depression and over 6 million are men. Depression remains one of the most prevalent disorders seen in primary care offices but health care providers are failing to diagnosis 30-50 percent of patients with depression. In addition, major depression is being reported as the primary cause of disability in developing countries. NIMH also reports that men are less likely than women to seek treatment for depression and men die from suicide at four times the rate of women. In addition, 80 percent of all suicides in the United States are men and male suicide rate at midlife is three times higher than at other times, for men over 65, it is seven times higher. There are no clear reasons for these statistics but the way men perceive being masculine may provide some additional information into this phenomenon. Methodology: This will be a qualitative study using a grounded theory approach. Grounded Theory was chosen because this study will require interpretative research methodology that will generate research based knowledge about how behavioral patterns shape social processes as men interact with their environment. Implications: The result of this study can provide further understanding of the phenomena men experience from depression. This knowledge will not only promote the health of men but will ultimately improve the health of families. Effective assessments and interventions for men with depression are required for nurses who care for men at all levels of the heath care environment to ensure quality of care. The knowledge and understanding generated from this study will allow nurse scientists to further explore how nurses can be more effective in the treatment of men and their related health issues. The discipline of nursing has the opportunity to build nursing knowledge to develop interventions to support services to men and continue to promote the health of men and society.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePsychological Processes of Men Living with Depressionen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157976-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Psychological Processes of Men Living with Depression</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Ramirez, Jeff, MSN, RN, PMH-NP, ARNP</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Eastern State Hospital</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">PhD Student</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">PO Box 800, Medical Lake, WA, 99022, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">509-299-7037</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">ramireje@dshs.wa.gov</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: The purpose of this study is to explore the phenomena of how men experience the process of depression to determine the human responses associated with the symptoms of depression, cultural influences, and their environment. Background of the Problem: Many studies have reported that women suffer from depression at higher rates than men. Some studies concluded that men are at higher risk for depression because men tend to be unidentified, under-diagnosed, and untreated for this disorder. Men with depression may be under-diagnosed because the symptoms of male depression are different than the classic symptoms health care professionals think of as depression: Men deny they have problems because society expects them to &quot;be strong;&quot; Men deny they have a problem with their sexuality and do not understand the relationship to depression; and the symptom clusters of male depression are not well-known so it remains unrecognized. According to the data from the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH), 18.8 million Americans suffer from depression and over 6 million are men. Depression remains one of the most prevalent disorders seen in primary care offices but health care providers are failing to diagnosis 30-50 percent of patients with depression. In addition, major depression is being reported as the primary cause of disability in developing countries. NIMH also reports that men are less likely than women to seek treatment for depression and men die from suicide at four times the rate of women. In addition, 80 percent of all suicides in the United States are men and male suicide rate at midlife is three times higher than at other times, for men over 65, it is seven times higher. There are no clear reasons for these statistics but the way men perceive being masculine may provide some additional information into this phenomenon. Methodology: This will be a qualitative study using a grounded theory approach. Grounded Theory was chosen because this study will require interpretative research methodology that will generate research based knowledge about how behavioral patterns shape social processes as men interact with their environment. Implications: The result of this study can provide further understanding of the phenomena men experience from depression. This knowledge will not only promote the health of men but will ultimately improve the health of families. Effective assessments and interventions for men with depression are required for nurses who care for men at all levels of the heath care environment to ensure quality of care. The knowledge and understanding generated from this study will allow nurse scientists to further explore how nurses can be more effective in the treatment of men and their related health issues. The discipline of nursing has the opportunity to build nursing knowledge to develop interventions to support services to men and continue to promote the health of men and society.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:23:15Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:23:15Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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